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Robert Bike

Robert
Bike

Licensed Massage Therapy #5473
Eugene, Oregon

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President of the Oregon Massage Therapists Association
2008-2010
& 2012-2013

I graduated from Freeport (Illinois) High School.
I'm a Pretzel!

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Copyright 2002 - present

Latest Copyright
April 30, 2014

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Remarkable Stories,
Volume 1


by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a Licensed Massage Therapist and Life Coach. An amateur historian, parts of these stories and many more appear on this website.

Buy now! Only 99 cents to download in .pdf format!

Want a paperback? List price $14.99, now only $11.99!

Biblical Aromatherapy

by Robert Bike

The Bible mentions about 232 plants by name, or closely enough to figure out what plant is meant. Of these, 24 are aromatic plants; that is, parts of the plants can be pressed or distilled to get an essential oil. Essential oils are the lifeblood of plants and have tremendous healing capabilities.

The healing power of plants is the basis for modern medicines.

Biblical Aromatherapy
discusses how the plants were used in biblical days and how you can use the essential oils from biblical plants.

Originally published in manuscript form in 1999, I completely revised the book and added illustrations.

To order Biblical Aromatherapy in paperback,
Click here.

List price $24.99; introductory offer $19.99


To order the pdf version and download to your computer or phone,

Click here.

The electronic version is only $2.99!

 

Publicity!

Olga Carlile, columnist for the Freeport (Illinois) Journal Standard, featured this website in her column on January 19, 2007.
Here is a jpg scan.

Harriet Gustason, another columnist for the Freeport Journal Standard, has featured this website twice. Click to see pdf of articles:
June 29, 2012
November 3, 2012

 

"My Life Purpose is to inspire my friends
and clients to achieve
success, health,
wealth and happiness
by empowering them
to reach their potential,
while living in harmony
with each other, animals
and our planet."
Robert Bike

Robert Bike, LMT, LLC

Below is the last of the Tilden 1880 History of Stephenson County, scanned. There are scanning errors, spelling differences and other problems. This took me a very long time to complete, and this scan and other info I've added to it is Copyright © 2013. If you use this info in any print or electronic media, please link to and give credit to this website.

These are the Biographical Sketches of select people living in Stephenson County, Illinois in 1880, from the Tilden 1880 History of Stephenson County, with select additions made by the webmaster.

The English language and spelling has changed tremendously since 1880. Tilden, the 1880 author, apparently didn't care too much about spelling words and names. On many occasions one person's name was spelled two different ways in the same paragraph, and once three different ways! I have no idea what the correct spelling was, in most cases, and have tried to maintain consistency.

Enjoy!

 

THE

HISTORY

OF

STEPHENSON COUNTY

ILLINOIS

CONTAINING

Biographical Sketches of Citizens, War Record of its Volunteers in the late Rebellion, General and Local Statistics, Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men, History of the Northwest, History of Illinois, Map of Stephenson County, Constitution of the United States, Miscellaneous Matters

ILLUSTRATED

CHICAGO

WESTERN HISTORICAL COMPANY,

1880

M. H. TILDEN

PREFACE.
The following pages, assuming to relate a history of Stephenson County from its earliest settlement to the present day, owe their appearance to the enterprise of an historical company, supplemented by the demand of a generous public. In its preparation, sources of information have been sought and appropriations freely made from presumably authentic data. No claim is made to originality, and numerous mistakes will doubtless be discovered, especially by those disposed to be hypercritical. In a work of such magnitude, these are unavoidable.

The author cannot pretend to have acquitted himself to his own satisfaction, though he has labored diligently to furnish a reliable, if yet an imperfect, compilation of facts and events which are alleged to have occurred in Stephenson County since the days when Kellogg, Kirker, Robey, Timms and others rejoiced to get into the wilderness. Whatever of merit or demerit the book contains remains for the reader to discover, and his judgment may be unprejudiced if he finds no word of promise on the introductory page.

In conclusion, he desires to make his acknowledgments to the Pioneers who still survive, to the Press, the cloth, the public officers, County, State and Federal, and other mediums of communication, not alone for "history," but for many kind acts, and much else that may contribute to whatever of success shall greet the succeeding pages.

A preface is generally regarded as the substitute for an apology. The author indulges the hope that, in equaling reasonable expectations, the substitute will be adopted by his readers.

M. H. Tilden.
Chicago, September, 1880.

CHICAGO:
CULVER, PAGE, HOYNE & CO., PRINTERS
115 and 120 Monroe Street.

 

CONTENTS OF THE 1880 HISTORY OF STEPHENSON COUNTY - PART FIVE

 

 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES
[BY TOWNSHIP]


ABBREVIATIONS
Co company or county
dlr dealer
I. V. A Illinois Volunteer Artillery
I. V. Illinois Volunteer Cavalry
I. V. I Illinois Volunteer Infantry
P. O. Post Office
S. or Sec Section
st street

Buckeye Township
Dakota Township
Erin Township
Florence Township
Freeport
Harlem Township
Jefferson Township
Kent Township
Lancaster Township
Loran Township
Oneco Township
Ridott Township
Rock Grove Township
Rock Run Township
Silver Creek Township
Waddams Township
West Point Township
Winslow Township

All sales go to help support this website.

Remarkable Stories, Volume 1
by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a Licensed Massage Therapist and Life Coach. An amateur historian, parts of these stories and many more appear on his website, www.robertbike.com.

Buy now! Only 99 cents to download in .pdf format!

Want a paperback? List price $14.99, now only $11.99!

 

FREEPORT

G. W. ACHENBACH, carriage painter, Bridge street, between Chicago and Van Buren streets; is a native of Columbia Co., Penn., and was born July 22, 1852; he grew up to manhood in that State, and learned his trade in Milton, Penn; he came West to Stephenson Co., and located in Freeport in March, 1877, and established his present business, and is building up a good trade.

HON. JOHN H. ADDAMS, [illustration], President of the Second National Bank of Freeport, is a native of Berks Co., Penn., and was born July 12, 1822, his parents being Samuel and Caharine (Huy) Addams; he received his early education in the common schools, and, with a comprehensive course, at an academy at Trappe, Penn., was well prepared for active life; on leaving school, he was apprenticed to the milling business; in 1844:, he came to Stephenson Co., Ill., and located in what is now called Cedarville, and established himself in business as a flour and grain dealer and miller, in which he is still interested; he also purchased a farm in the vicinity; in 1847 he took a prominent part in calling a convention of land-owners and business men of the district which resulted in a concert of action that pushed to completion the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad; he appreciated the absolute necessity for obtaining an outlet for the produce of that region by railway, and he exerted himself to draw the attention of the people to it and to induce, them to subscribe for stock in the enterprise; in 1854, he was elected to the State Senate as a Republican, and held the seat continuously for sixteen years, retiring in 1870. In 1844, he was married to Miss Sarah Weber, daughter of Col. Weber, of Kreiderville, Penn.; she died in 1863, and in 1868, he married Mrs. William Halderman, of Freeport; he lives at Cedarville, where he is very highly esteemed as an active and public-spirited citizen; he was energetic in his support of the Union cause during the war; in 1864, he aided in the organization of the Second National Bank of Freeport, and was elected its President; he retains that position at the present time; he is regarded throughout the district as a political leader of the highest type, and, both politically and socially, enjoys the confidence of all classes; he has been urged, upon several occasions, to become a candidate for Congress, to which he could have been elected, with but little, if any, opposition, but has declined; he is a gentleman of fine culture and of sound judgment, and has justly earned prominence in public estimation in both civil and private affairs.

DANIEL ADAMSON, house, sign and ornamental and decorative painter, and dealer in paints, oils, and wallpaper, 89 Stephenson street; is a native of Manchester, England, and glass born Aug. 23, 1834; he grew up and attended school there, and was educated in his present business in England, principally under the Government; he attended the school of design seven and a half years, graduated and was awarded diplomas and medals for his proficiency in his profession; he afterward engaged in teaching for several years; in 1857, he came to Toronto, and was engaged in portrait painting there; then came to New York, where he engaged in art and decorative painting; he came to Freeport in 1862, and established his present business in a small way in a room only sixteen feet square, and from that small beginning he has built up his present extensive business, extending from Chicago to Western Iowa. There are very few persons so thoroughly educated in their profession as Mr. Adamson; in frescoing art and decorative painting he excels, and the fine character of work done by him through Illinois and Iowa, testify to his taste and ability. He carries a large stock of all kinds of goods of the best quality in his line, and conducts the leading business in paints, oils, glass, wall paper, in this section of the State.

LOUIS AHSENDORFF, of the firm of Ahsendorff & Bonn, dealers in dry goods and groceries, cor. Galena avenue and Galena street; is a native of Germany, and was born in Prussia March 27, 1827; he emigrated to America in 1849, and came West to Galena, and worked in the lead mines, and came to Freeport in 1852; he opened a paint shop, and was afterward clerk in a store, and has been engaged in mercantile business for past twenty years. He has held the office of Assistant Supervisor, and is identified with the interests of the city.

CAPT. PHIL. ARNO, dealer in wines and liquors, 53 Stephenson street; is a native of Germany, and was born in Bavaria July 30, 1837; he came to the United States in 1846; lived in Rochester six years, then came to Milwaukee; came to Stephenson Co., and located in Freeport, in January 1858, and engaged in the coopering business. When the war broke out, he enlisted in 1861, in the 46th I. V. 1. and was elected 1st Lieut. Co. C; he was in the service over three years; he was promoted and commissioned Captain and brevetted Major; he participated in all the battles of the regiment except one, and then was prevented by sickness. After the war he returned, and since then has been engaged in business here. He belongs to Evergreen Lodge, A. F. & A. M.. and to Freeport Lodge, I. O. O. F., Germania Society, and the Fire Department. In 1863, Capt. Arno was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Albright, a native of Pennsylvania; they have five children — Sarah G, Willie P., Maggie A., Edward C., and Emma L.

JOHN ARTHUR, foreman, shops C. & N. W. R. R.; is a native of England, and was born in 1828; he grew up to manhood there, and came to the United States in 1850; he came to Stephenson Co. in 1864, and located in Freeport, and entered the employ of the C. & N. W. R. R., and since then, for the past sixteen years, has been connected with the company here. He has held his present position of foreman since 1874. In 1849, Mr. Arthur was united in marriage to Miss Harriet Davis, a native of England; they have four children — William, Emma, John, Daniel.

BREVET MAJ. GEN. SMITH D. ATKINS, [illustration], lawyer, soldier and journalist, was born June 9, 1835, near Elmira, Chemung Co., N. Y., and removed to Illinois, with his father's family, in 1848, living on a farm until 1850; he then entered the office of the Prairie Democrat to learn the art of printing; this was the first paper published in Freeport; he was educated at Rock River Seminary, Mt. Morris, Ill., working in the printing office and studying during his spare hours, and, in 1852, obtained the foremanship of the Mt. Morris Gazette, while yet a student; in June, 1853, associated with C. C. Allen, late Major on the staff of Maj. Gen. Schofield; he bought out this paper, and established the Register at Savannah, Carroll Co.; in the fall of the same year, he entered the office of Hiram Bright, in Freeport, as a student at law, and was admitted to practice June 27, 1855; after his admission, he continued to read law for some time in the office of Goodrich & Scoville, Chicago, and then entered upon his practice in Freeport, dating his entry into the active duties of his high profession Sept. 1, 1856; in 1860, he made a spirited canvass for the election of Lincoln to the Presidency, and one address of his, delivered in this campaign, which was a careful and thorough review of the Dred-Scott decision, went through several editions; he was elected State's Attorney for the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of Illinois, and on April 17, 1861, while trying a criminal case in Stephenson Circuit Court, a telegram was received stating that President Lincoln had issued his first call for troops to suppress the rebellion; he immediately drafted in the court-room an enlistment roll, which he headed with his own name, being the first man to enlist as a private soldier in his county; he then announced to the court and the jury his decision to prepare without delay for service in the Union army; leaving the half-finished case in the hands of a brother attorney, he hastened out of the court-room with his enlistment roll, and went into the streets of Freeport to find men to join; before dusk, one hundred had signed the roll, and in the evening a company organization was formed with him in the position of Captain. He and his companions-in-arms went to Springfield, where they were mustered in as Company A of the 11th I. V. I.; upon the expiration of his three months' service, he re-enlisted for three years as a private, and was again mustered in as Captain of Company A, 11th I. V. I., at Bird's Point; he was at Ft. Donelson, with the unexpired order of leave of absence on account of sickness, in his pocket, when the command of “Forward” was given; he took sixty-eight men into this desperate engagement, and came out with but twenty-three left, having been in the very thickest of the carnage; for gallant services at Ft. Donelson, he was promoted to the position of Major of the 11th Regiment, and went on the staff of Gen. Hurlburt as Acting Assistant Adjutant General by the special assignment of Gen. Grant, and, in that capacity, was engaged with Hurlburt in the battle of Pittsburg Landing, his bravery and conspicuous services securing special mention in the general orders after that fight; ill health, brought on by exhausting labors and exposure, compelled his resignation after the affair of Pittsburg Landing, and he spent the two subsequent months on the sea coast; he recruited in time to take the stump to raise troops under the call of 1862, and enlisted in the 92d Illinois Regiment, which was mustered in, with himself as Colonel, on Sept. 1, 1862; he was in command of this regiment until Jan. 17, 1863, when he was placed in command of a brigade. While the 92d was at Mt. Sterling, Ky., Col. Atkins being in charge of it, a grave issue arose; it was the first Yankee regiment which had visited that section, and hundreds of slaves flocked to its camp begging for protection, and offering their services or their blood for freedom; they refused to return to their masters, and, when their owners demanded them as chattels, Col. Atkins declined to entertain the peremptory request that his force should be used to drive them back; the owners appealed to the commander of the brigade, a Kentuckian, who ordered Atkins to return the slaves, but the latter persistently declined to do this, and never did, his reasons being that he was not responsible for the escapade of the slaves, and that his men had not enlisted to act in the capacity of blood-hounds to hunt them down and drive them back. On June 17, 1863, he was placed in command of the 2d Brigade, 3d Division, Army of Kentucky, which he commanded while in the Department of the Ohio; when the 92d Regiment was removed to the Department of the Cumberland, he was placed in command of the 1st Brigade, 1st Division of the Reserve Corps, and, when the regiment was mounted and transferred to Wilder's Brigade of Mounted Infantry, he accompanied and commanded it, until transferred to Kilpatrick's Cavalry Division. When Gen. Kilpatrick re-formed his division preparatory to the great march with Sherman, he assigned the command of the 2d Brigade to Col. Atkins; when Sherman advanced southward, he aimed to throw his army between the rebel forces and Savannah; the task of deceiving the enemy and holding them while this movement was being effected was given by Kilpatrick to Col. Atkins and his brigade, and he skillfully accomplished it; at Clinton, he charged the enemy and drove them fourteen miles to Macon; he assaulted their lines about the city, and forced them into their works, and held them there until Sherman swept to the eastward, leaving him with the enemy in his rear, and nothing before him to impede his rapid progress. In all the engagements in which he participated with his brigade, Col. Atkins greatly distinguished himself, and especially so at Waynesboro, where Wheeler and his cavalry were overwhelmingly defeated; while leading the charge of his troops against the rebel columns, his color-bearer was shot down by his side, and his brigade flag attracted the attention of the enemy, who poured in upon it their concentrated fire; in this terrific storm of leaden hail, he bore a charmed life, leading prominently in the van and cheering on his troops to victory. At Savannah, he was brevetted Brigadier General for gallantry, and was assigned to duty under his commission as Brevet Brigadier General by special order of President Lincoln, and at the close of the war, when he was mustered out, he was brevetted Major General for faithful and important services. In all his stations as a commanding officer he was popular with both the rank and file; he was a perfect disciplinarian, and was kind and considerate to the men under him; his courage and his judgment as a strategist won their confidence, and they readily and heartily supported him wherever he went. After his military services, he returned to Freeport, where he has since resided. He was the able editor of the Freeport Journal until the past four years, and holds the office of Postmaster of the city of Freeport. His life has been one of great activity.

ANSON A. BABCOCK, [illustration], retired, residence, Green street; is a native of Cortland Co., N. Y., and was born June 1, 1813; he grew up and attended school there; after reaching manhood, in February, 1837, he was united in marriage to Miss Harriet Price, a native of Cortland Co., N. Y.; on the 12th of February, 1839, they started West with horse and sleigh; at the end of the first day, they reached Auburn, N. Y.; while coming through Michigan they met a number of persons who did not like the “West,” and were returning to their old homes East, which was not very encouraging to the young emigrants; they were four weeks on the road; they visited a brother of Mr. Babcock, living a few miles west of Chicago, then came to Stephenson Co., and arrived here in March of the same year and settled in Ridott Township, and began making a farm; after living there three years, moved in Florence Township; he bought a claim and entered it from the Government when the land came into market; he carted three hundred bushels of wheat one winter to Chicago, by team; Mr. Babcock was one of the pioneer settlers in this county, and has always been one of its progressive representative men; he has held the offices of Collector and Assessor, and has been several times elected a member of the Board of Supervisors. Mr. and Mrs. Babcock have four children — James (living here), Sarah (now Mrs. J. Hance, living in this county), Mariette (now Mrs. Aspinwall, living in Grand Bapids, Mich.), Helen A. (now Mrs. Hart, living in Benton Co., Iowa; they lost one son (Burton) in infancy.

F. S. BABCOCK, manufacturer of cigars and wholesale and retail dealer in cigars, tobacco and smokers' goods, Stephenson street, opposite the Brewster House; is a native of Cortland Co., N. Y., and was born Nov. 11, 1851; his parents came West to Stephenson Co. in 1856, and he grew up and attended school here; he established his present business in 1878; he manufactures several very popular brands of cigars, the “Mabel,” the “Silvie” and the “X-10-U-8,” and is building up a good trade. Mr. Babcock was united in marriage to Miss Ella M. Burrell Feb. 23, 1876; she died May 11, 1880, leaving one daughter (Mabel).

I. J. BABCOCK, architect and builder, Clay street; is a native of Cortland Co., N. Y., and was born Dec. 18, 1818; he grew up there, and in 1836 came to Illinois, to Babcock's Grove, a few miles west of Chicago, where his brothers located in 1833, just after the Black Hawk War; Mr. Babcock remained with his brothers two years, and came to Stephenson Co. in 1838; the following year he went back to New York State, and in 1856 returned here and located permanently and engaged in building; he has been engaged in building over a quarter of a century; he was superintendent of building the Stephenson County Court House, and for his efficiency in that position he was presented with a handsome gold watch, inscribed as follows: “Presented to Ira Babcock, Superintendent of Freeport Court House, by the architect, E. E. Myers, for the faithful carrying-out of the plans of the building, 1873.” In 1842, Mr. Babcock was united in marriage to Miss Abagail M. Curtis, born in Cayuga Co., N. Y.; they have four children — Edward O., Frank S., Alice A. and Mary C.

LELAND A. BABCOCK, [illustration], physician and surgeon, Chicago street, third south of Washington street; is a native of Troy, N. Y., and was born April 29, 1818; he grew up and attended school there, then entered Union College, Mass., and graduated from that institution; he studied medicine and surgery with the eminent surgeon, Dr. Valentine Mott, of the city of New York; in 1844, he went abroad, and spent about three years; for a year and a half was a student in Paris, under the eminent surgeon Velpeaux; he traveled extensively through Europe, Asia, and Egypt and Palestine; after his return to his native land, in 1848, he came West to Chicago; in July, 1861, he came to Stephenson Co., and located in Freeport, and since then has practiced his profession here; Dr. Babcock has done much to advance the interests of the profession; he has perfected several important inventions for the relief of the suffering — the silver speculum, the silver adjuster and the hernia truss; he has delivered many lectures, and written much for the profession; there is probably no physician in Northern Illinois who has so many calls outside of his regular practice. In 1867, Dr. Babcock married Miss Ellen Bechtol, a native of this county; they have one son — Leland.

HENRY BAIER, of the firm of Baier & Seyfarth, proprietors of the Freeport Brewery, corner of Adams and Jackson streets; is a native of Germany, and was born in Bavaria, May 7, 1836; his parents came to this country in 1843, and the same year came to Stephenson Co.; he grew up to manhood here; he has engaged in business here since 1855; he associated with Mr. Seyfarth, and engaged in their present business in 1869; ho has held the office of City Alderman. In 1860. he married Miss Johanna Seyfarth, of this city; they have two children, Emma and Alma. Mr. Baier belongs to the Germania Society, and is a member of the order of I. O. O. F.

FRED BAKER, retired, residence, Galena avenue; is a native of Orange Co., Ind., and was born Nov. 1, 1820; his parents removed to Sangamon Co., Ill., in 1823; in the spring of 1827, they came to the lead-mining region in Jo Daviess Co.; in 1829, they went back to Peoria; in the spring of 1832, they came again to the lead-mining country in La Fayette Co., Wis.; during the Black Hawk war, he was forted in Ft. Defiance; after the war, he was in Dubuque two years; he and his father came to what is now Freeport, Dec. 19, 1835; his mother came the following February; his father opened a trading-post with the Indians; they kept tavern, and had to accommodate every one that came along. Mr. Baker's father entered and owned the land where the city of Freeport is now located. Mr. Fred Baker was united in marriage, Feb. 11, 1841, to Miss Clarinda Crain; she was born in Randolph Co., Ill., Dec. 15, 1819; her father came to Carroll Co. in 1829. Mr. Baker held the office of Constable, Deputy Sheriff for fifteen years, and was Acting Sheriff a portion of the time; afterward engaged in farming in Silver Creek Township until 1879, when he sold his farm and came to the city. Mr. Baker has been elected and served as a member of the Board of Supervisors many years; he has also held the office of Justice of the Peace, Road Commissioner, and other town and school offices. Mr. Baker helped cut and draw the first stick of timber put in the first building erected in Freeport. Mr. and Mrs. Baker are among the very earliest settlers, and there are very few now living who have as clear and accurate a recollection of the earliest days of what was then included in Jo Daviess Co.; they have had eight children, only three of whom survive — one daughter Harrier, now Mrs. Joseph Weaver, and two sons, John and Frank, both married, and all living in Freeport.

ELIAS BAMBERGER, carpenter and builder, Apple street; was born in Lebanon Co., Penn., July 8, 1834; he came West to Illinois in 1851, located in Stephenson Co., and learned the trade of carpenter and joiner. In 1861, he married Barbara Sechrist, from York Co., Penn.; she died in August, 1875, leaving three children — John, Luella M. and Ida M. In 1878, Mr. Bamberger married Lovina Hennersheets, from Berks Co., Penn.; they have one daughter — Minnie. Mr. Bamberger is one of the oldest builders in the county.

W. G. & W. BARNES, manufacturers and jobbers of farm implements and agricultural machinery; established 1865. Factory, office and salesrooms on Stephenson, Mechanic and Bridge streets, Freeport.

H. M. BARNUM, of the firm of Barton & Barnum, attorneys and counselors at law, Galena avenue, opposite court house; is a native of Addison Co., Vt., and was born Feb. 6, 1835; he grew up aud attended school there, and afterward entered Middlebury College and graduated from that institution in the class of 1858; the following year, he came west to Illinois and located in Freeport, where he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1861; he engaged in teaching, and was Principal of the high school until 1864, when he became associated with II. C. Burchard and E. P. Barton, in the practice of law, the firm being Burchard, Barton & Barnum, until 1871, when Mr. Burchard retired, having been elected to Congress; since then the firm of Barton & Barnum have been leading attorneys here; Mr. Barnum has held the offices of Justice of i he Peace, City Attorney and school offices. Mr. Barnum was united in marriage, Aug. 8, 1864, to Miss Ellen P. Wright, a native of Addison Co., Vt.

FREDERIC BARTLETT, wholesale and retail dealer in hardware and iron, Stephenson street, is a native of New York, and was born in the city of Brooklyn, Oct. 7, 1837, his parents being William and Mary (Crie) Bartlett; he received his early education in the common schools, and, by a full and comprehensive course in the Polytechnic Academy in his native place received a substantial knowledge of the arts and sciences, and of the rules so necessary in the transaction of general business; upon leaving school, he entered a hardware house in New York City as clerk, and subsequently became its buyer; in 1855, he came west to Illinois, and located in Freeport, and established his present business, the firm being Churchill, Maverick & Bartlett; in 1858, Mr. Maverick retired, and was followed by Mr. Churchill in 1860, since which time, over twenty years, Mr. Bartlett has carried on the business in his own name; at first, the transactions of the house were small, but by the application of Mr. Bartlett, and by his honorable method of dealing, the business soon grew into very large proportions. It now includes, besides ordinary hardware, iron, wagon and buggy stock, seasoned and ready for use, stoves, hollow-ware, combining several distinct businesses in one; Mr. Bartlett is a careful business man, fair dealing in all his mercantile transactions, enterprising, generous and courteous to all who approach him; and his success in life is owing to his own efforts.

E. P. BARTON, of the firm of Barton & Barnum, attorneys and counselors at law, Galena ave., opposite court house, is a native of Oneida Co., New York, and was born June 5, 1829; he grew up and attended school there, and afterward entered Hamilton College, and graduated in the class of 1851; after graduating he studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1852; he practiced law in Brooklyn until 1855, when he came West to Illinois and located in Freeport, and engaged in the practice of his profession the following year; he associated with Thos. I. Turner and H. C. Burchard, the firm being Turner, Burchard & Barton; in 1858, Mr. Turner retired, and the firm became Burchard & Barton; in 1864, H. M. Barnum was admitted a member of the firm; and the firm of Burchard, Barton & Barnum continued until 1871, when Mr. Burchard retired, having been elected to Congress; since 1871, the firm of Barton & Barnum has been the leading law firm in this city. Mr. Barton was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Walker, a native of Chautauqua Co., New York, Oct. 13, 1864; they have two daughters — Alice M. and Anna E.

FRED BAUCH, florist and gardener, Galena avenue, was born in Prussia, April 27, 1832; he came to the United States in 1853, and came to Stephenson Co. the same year; a few years later, he established his present business in a small way, and he has successfully continued the business for twenty-five years, and has built up a good trade; he owns twenty acres finely improved; he built his large, commodious residence in the fall of 1879. In 1857, Mr. Bauch married Miss Barbara Wyant, a native of Prussia; they have ten children — Ida, Fred, Emma, Louie, Matilda, Louise, Eddie, Mary, Clara and John.

CHARLES BAUMGARTEN, retired, is a native of Loraine, France, and was born July 6, 1817; he emigrated to America in 1833, came West to Detroit, Mich., and lived there two years, and in 1835 came to Chicago, walking all the way; at that time Chicago contained only three thousand people, and was not incorporated; he was employed in the Government works, and was there when Gen. Scott was there; he is one of the oldest members of the Old Settlers' Association of Chicago; in 1850, Mr. Baumgarten came to Freeport and engaged in contracting on railroads, and has lived here most of the time for the past thirty years; he built the Keystone Hotel;
he was elected City Marshal; he was elected City Surveyor, and held that office seven years; when he began life, he had nothing, and earned what he has by his energy and industry. He was united in marriage, Dec. 26, 1842, to Miss Mary Anna Frett, a native of Prussia; they have six children, four daughters — Amelia, Rosa, Justina and Pauline, living in St. Louis — and two sons, John, civil engineer, in the Government service, Washington, D. C, and Albert, engaged in business here.

DR. J. H. BEAUMONT, homoeopathic physician and surgeon, office, Opera House Block, is a native of New York State, and was born in Champlain, Clinton Co., Feb. 12, 1818; he grew up and attended school there, and began reading medicine; he came West to Northern Indiana, and in 1849 he came to Stephenson Co. and located in Freeport; he began the study of medicine under allopathic system, but being convinced in his own mind of the superior advantages of the principles of Hahnemann, he pursued his studies under that system, and graduated at Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago, in 1863, and since then has practiced his profession here, and has a large and leading practice. In 1879, Dr. Beaumont was elected President of the Illinois Homoeopathic State Medical Association; he is also a member of the American Institute of Homoeopathy. Dr. Beaumont married Miss Alcista M. Bedee, a native of Kutland, Vt.; they have three children — Emma A., now Mrs. Clark, of this city; Rose A, now Mrs. Dr. Currier, of Sycamore, Ill.; John F., physician, after pursuing a thorough course of study, and graduating at Hahnemann Medical College, Philadelphia, he went to New York, and took a regular course in the Ophthalmic Hospital connected with New York Homoeopathic College.

MRS. HELENA BECK, whose maiden name was Helena Reiser, was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1818; she grew up there, and came to America in 1847, and lived in Milford, Mass. In 1849, she married Frank Hertrich, a native of Bavaria, Germany; they came to Stephenson Co. in 1857; he engaged in the brewing business; his death occurred in 1861; they had five children, all born in Milford, Mass., and only three are living — Helena, Paulina and Martha. In October, 1866, she married Charles T. Beck, a native of Bavaria, Germany; he died in November, 1867; they had one son, Charles Frank.

W. L. BEEBE, retired farmer and stock-raiser, residence Galena avenue; is a native of New York State, and was born Feb. 9, 1812; he grew up in that State. After reaching manhood, on the 11th of June, 1835, he was united in marriage to Miss Sallie Ann Tripp, a native of Seneca Co., NT. Y.; they came to Michigan in 1838, and remained in that State two years; in 1840, they came to Illinois, bringing their furniture with them on a wagon, and beside that they had only $30 in money when they crossed the river at Oregon, in Ogle Co., where they settled. Mrs. Beebe lived in a shanty while her husband made several trips to Chicago with his team; Mr. Beebe borrowed $50 and with this money entered 40 acres of land; he and his wife both say that they felt rich when they owned their first 40 acres; he entered 40 acres more; they made a farm, and with industry and economy prospered; lived in that county until 1862, and owned 600 acres of land, when they came to Stephenson Co. and engaged in farming and raising fine stock, and since then have lived in this county. Mr. Beebe had nothing when he began; one winter he thrashed with a flail 2,200 bushels of grain, and used to cart grain with his team for 50 cents a day; he owns a large, valuable farm adjoining the city, and also owns one in Ogle Co. Mr. and Mrs. Beebe have eight children — Robert S., Henry T., Alexander I., Nancy E., Clarissa C., Milton B., Philip S. and Frank C.; Mrs. Beebe's mother died in November, 1876; her father, 89 years old, and her six sisters and three brothers, are all living; her brother, Robert Tripp, helped to capture Jefferson Davis during the war; Mr. Beebe's father came to Ogle Co. in 1837; he lived and died on the claim he first made, and was past 91 years of age at the time of his death.

ROBERT BELL, proprietor of the Tremont House, corner of Clay and Chicago streets, is a native of Pennsylvania, and was born in Lebanon Co. Dee. 19, 1813; he grew up to manhood in that State; in April, 1843, he and his brother started for the West; they rode on horseback all the way to Illinois, and arrived in Stephenson Co. in June, 1843; they located on Cedar Creek and began making a farm. In 1845, Mr. Beil was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Ann McCool, from Lewisburg, Union Co., Penn.; she came with her parents to this county in 1841. Mr. Bell continued farming until 1877, when he came into the city, and in 1879 he opened the Tremont House; he held the offices of County Supervisor, Road Commissioner and School Director. Mr. and Mrs. Bell have five children — Ellen Mary, now Mrs. Laird, in Nebraska; James, living in Kansas; Lucretia, Joseph and Eva at home.

DAVID BENSON, cashier for Mrs. J. Benson, dealer in fancy dry goods and notions, Opera House Block, 120 Stephenson street; is a native of Ohio, and was born in Cincinnati Sept. 2, 1825; he came to Rock Island in 1856. During the war he entered the service, enlisting in the 12th I. V. I., and was commissioned Captain of Co. D; he afterward entered the service of the Illinois Central Railroad, and remained with that company eight years. In 1864, Mr. Benson was united in marriage to Miss Jeanette Brown, a native of Michigan; they came to Freeport in 1872, and Mrs. Benson established her present business; she buys all of her goods, has the entire management of the business, and has successfully carried it on for the past eight years, having built up a large trade.

H. D. BENTLEY, dealer in pianos, organs and all kinds of musical instruments and sheet music, No. 144 Stephenson street; is a native of England, and was born in the city of London Dec. 5, 1848; his parents came to the United States in 1851; they came to Stephenson Co. and located in Freeport the same year; he grew up and received his education here; after leaving school, he entered the music store of Pelton & Pomeroy; he went to Chicago with this firm and was book-keeper and cashier, and afterward did the buying for the extensive business of that house; he remained there five years, and in 1879 established his present business; he has had a large practical experience in the music business; he has unusual facilities for buying the best instruments, and by his energy is building up a large trade. Mr. Bentley was united in marriage Dec. 27, 1875, to Miss Elida Jane Pattison, daughter of Richard Pattison, of this city; they have one son — Charles Johnson.

AUGUST BERGMAN, of the firm of Bergman & Dorman, livery stable and dealers in agricultural implements, Bridge and Exchange streets; is a native of Prussia, Germany, and was born Sept. 27, 1835; he came to the United States in 1852, and the same year came to Stephenson Co., and settled in Freeport; he soon after engaged in making brick, and continued for eight years; in 1864, he engaged in the livery business, and, in 1867, he also engaged in the sale of farm machinery, in a small shanty; they have carried on the business for thirteen years; their trade has steadily increased, until now they have become one of the largest dealers in agricultural implements in the Northwest; their large and commodious brick block, fronting on Bridge and Van Buren streets, is fully occupied with their business. Mr. Bergman was elected Street Commissioner in 1864; he has held the office of Alderman six years, and other town offices. Mr. Bergman was united in marriage to Miss Mary Scharer, from Maryland, April 12, 1864; they have five children — August H., William, Mary, Minnie and Edith.

S. J. BEST, physician and surgeon, Stephenson St., Freeport; is a native of Clinton Co., Penn., and was born June 22, 1837; his parents came West to Illinois during his early boyhood, and located in Stephenson Co. in 1847; he grew up and attended school here, then entered the seminary at Mt. Morris, where he remained five years; he began reading medicine here for a short time, then went East and pursued his studies in the city of Philadelphia for five years, under the preceptorship of his uncle, Dr. A. J. Crotzer, and graduated at Jefferson Medical College in 1860; after graduating, he returned to Freeport and engaged in the practice of medicine, and practiced his profession here for twenty years; he is a member of the Stephenson County Medical Society. In April, 1864, Dr. Best was united in marriage to Miss Kate S. Wolf, a native of Union Co., Penn.; they have five children — Charles, Nellie, Harry, James and an infant daughter.

CHARLES BETTS, attorney at law; is a native of Batavia, N. Y. and was born June 13, 1824; he grew up and received his education in that State; he entered the law office of Redfield & Pringle, and began reading law; he afterward continued his studies in the office of Hon. Isaac A. Verplank and Hon. John H. Martindale; he was admitted to the. bar at Rochester, N. Y., in 1847; the following year, he emigrated to the State of Illinois, and located at Freeport, which was then a very small place; he engaged in the practice of law. In the political campaign of 1852, when quite a young man, he received, unsolicited, the nomination of the Whig party for the office of Auditor General of the State of Illinois; since the political revolution of the country of 1858, Mr. Betts has acted with the Democratic party; he indorsed the sentiments and principles of Hon. Stephen A. Douglas, and supported him with all his energies, and was his firm friend until his death; at the Congressional Convention of the Democratic party of the Third Congressional District in 1870, he received, without solicitation, the nomination for Congress in this district, strongly Republican, and, where the candidate of his party was defeated two years previous by ten thousand majority, he reduced that majority nearly one-half; he continued the practice of his profession until within a short time. In August, 1878, Mr. Betts was united in marriage to Miss Mary C. Wilson, a native of this city; they have one daughter.

BILKER & REINHOLD, manufacturers and wholesale dealers in fine cigars, 84 Stephenson St.; the business was established in March, 1879, by W. G. Billker; he is a native of Germany; he came to Freeport in 1863; in March, 1880, Edward Reinhold became associated with him; he is a native of Baltimore; he came to Freeport in 1867; the firm became Billker & Reinhold; they engaged in manufacturing cigars, and have built up a good trade in this State and in Iowa.

JOHN BILLERBECK, proprietor of the Vienna Bakery, Galena street east of Galena avenue; is a native of Prussia, Germany, and was born Nov. 13, 1835 and came to America in 1853, and came to Freeport the same year; he has been engaged in business here over twenty years; he established his present business, and is building up a nice trade. He belongs to the German Benevolent Society and to the Fire Department. In 1864, he married Miss Minnie Reineke, a native of Germany; he has five children — Anna, Anton, Lotta, Josie and Charlie.

PETER BIXLER, manufacturer of woodwork, carriages and buggies, Van Buren street, north of Bridge street; is a native of Pennsylvania, and was born in Williamsport, Lycoming Co., Oct. 29, 1847; he grew up and learned his trade there; he came West, and located in Freeport, in 1868, and engaged in his present business in 1870, and has carried it on since then, and has built up a good trade. He is a member of Winnesheik Lodge, No. 30, I. O. O. F.,also, a membar Co. C, I. N. G. He married Miss Sarah C. Dubbs, a native of Pennsylvania; she died Oct. 26, 1876, leaving two sons— Harry F., born Dec. 3, 1870; Samuel R., born Dec. 22, 1873.

DANIEL S. BOGAR, merchant, dealer in dry goods and groceries, 153 Stephenson street; is a native of Pennsylvania, and was born in Lewisburg, Union Co., Aug. 16, 1823; he grew up to manhood in that State; he came to Stephenson Co., in 1850, but did not locate here permanently until 1852; he entered a store as clerk; he was afterward express messenger on the I. C. R. R. In 1860, he engaged in mercantile business. He has held the office of Postmaster at McConnell's Grove. In 1866, Mr. Bogar, was united in marriage to Miss Hattie E. Buckley, a native of Unadilla, Otsego Co, New York. They have one daughter — Ettie J.

GEORGE BORDNER, of the firm of Bordner & Rosebrough, wholesale and retail dealers in coal, water lime and stucco; is a native of Union Co., Pa., and was born March 19, 1824; he grew up to manhood in that State; he went to New York State, and remained a few years, and came West to Illinois, in 1848, and arrived in Freeport, October 24, of that year; he worked at anything he could find to do, and afterward engaged in farming; very few men worked harder than Mr. Bordner to get started; at that time there was very little money to be had; he has cradled oats for 20 cents an acre, and had to take store pay; he split rails for Hon. J. H. Addams for 50 cents per hundred, and walked three miles to his work; in 1863, he engaged in the livery business, and continued for seven years; then engaged in shipping horses East and South; in 1876 he engaged in his present business. He is also a member of the firm of J. E. Rosebrough & Co., grain dealers, at Ashton, Ill. Mr. Bordner was united in marriage, Oct. 24, 1850, to Miss Lovina Roush, from Center Co., Pa.; they have had eight children, four of whom survive — Minerva M., Etta, Delia and Lyma.

D. B. BREED, of the Journal Printing Co., is a native of New York State, and was born in Jamestown, Chautauqua Co., Oct. 1, 1852; when 11 years of age he came to Illinois, and entered the Journal printing office at Amboy, Lee Co.; the following year he came to Freeport and entered the printing office of the Freeport Journal, and has been connected with the office since then, and has filled every position from “devil” up; he has been interested in the business of the office since 1873. He holds the office of City Treasurer; was elected to that position in April, 1880. Mr. Breed is prominently identified with the Masonic order, and has held the position of Secretary of M. R. Thompson Lodge for a number of years.

M. V. BROWN, dealer in coal, hides,wool, seeds, lime and stucco; office and yard foot of Stephenson street; is a native of Huron Co, Ohio, and was born June 1, 1838; his parents came to Stephenson Co. in 1853; he grew up and attended school here; after reaching manhood, he engaged in his present business, and has carried it on for the past twenty years; there are few men in this county and adjoining counties, in this line of business, who are as well and favorably known, and he has a large established trade. Mr. Brown was united in marriage July 24, 1862, in this city, to Miss Matilda S. Sherbondy; they have one son — William. Mr. Brown is prominently identified with the Masonic order, having taken all the degrees except the 33d.

BENJAMIN T. BUCKLEY, physician and surgeon, Exchange street, opposite court house; is a native of Unadilla, Otsego Co., N. Y., and was born Sept,, 18, 1825; he grew up and attended school there, and came West to Illinois, with his father and family; they arrived in Stephenson Co. in April, 1846; they located in Harlem Township, only a short distance from the city; he studied medicine, and attended lectures at Rush Medical College, Chicago, and graduated from that institution in 1852; after graduating, he engaged in the practice of medicine, and since then has practiced his profession here, except four years he practiced in California. He has held the office of Examining Surgeon for Pensions, and has served in the City Council. In October, 1857, Dr. Buckley was united in marriage to Miss Lila A. Sabin, from Ohio; they have two sons — Charles S. and Benjamin R.

HON. HORATIO C. BURCHARD, [illustration], Director of the United States Mints, was born at Marshall, Oneida Co., N. Y., Sept. 22, 1825; his parents were Horatio Burchard and Frances (Chapin) Burchard, both of Springfield, Mass.; in 1840, he removed with the family to Beloit, Wis.; he attended school there, and afterward entered Hamilton College, New York, and graduated from that institution in 1850; he studied law, and was admitted to the bar in Monroe, Green Co., Wis., in 1852; in 1854, he took charge of the Freeport, Ill., schools, as General Manager and Head Teacher; in 1855, he became associated with Thomas I. Turner, under the style of Turner & Burchard, for the practice of law; in 1856, E. P. Barton, Esq., was admitted as a partner, and, T. I. Turner retiring in 1858, the firm of Burchard & Barton was continued until 1864, when H. M. Barnum, Esq., was added to the firm, which continued until 1871, when Mr. Burchard retired from the firm after being elected to Congress; in 1862, he engaged in mercantile business, in the hardware trade, and associated with his brother, Jesse Burchard, under the firm name of H. C. Burchard & Bro., which was continued until 1869, while in the interim, he was professionally and successfully occupied in the courts of Stephenson and adjoining counties. From 1857 to 1860, he was School Commissioner of Stephenson Co., Ill.; in 1863 and 1865, he was a prominent member of the Legislature of Illinois; in the session of 1863, he was a member of the Committee on Claims, and in that of 1865, was Chairman of the Committee on Banks and Corporations; during the war session of the Legislature he warmly and efficiently sustained the war measures of Gov. Yates for the support of the war and the relief of the soldiers; he introduced and supported several very important bills, which became laws upon our statute books, among them was the bill allowing the soldiers to vote, and the Registration law; he was prominent in opposing and defeating the bill introduced by the Democrats, for the purpose of taking the appointing power from Gov. Yates, and vesting it in a Commission; he introduced the bill authorizing the payment of bounties to soldiers. In 1869, he was elected to Congress, at a special election held to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of E. B. Washburne; he was successively elected to the 42d, 43d, 44th and 45th Congresses; during the 41st Congress, serving upon the Committee on Banking and Currency, of which Gen. Garfield was chairman, the first speeches of Mr. Burchard were in connection with the tariff question, in the earliest of which he discussed the subject at length; he also discussed largely the subject of the currency, dwelling on the office of money, the necessary supply of coin, the value of circulation required, the actual amount in circulation in our own and other countries, and several other important questions; the conclusion of his able speech was as follows: “We are, returning safely, slowly, surely, to the goal of a sound, redeemable currency, from which eight years ago we, perhaps necessarily, departed; the country rejoices to see the national credit restored, and a stable standard of value regained, unaided by Congressional legislation, and controlled by the higher laws of trade and commerce during the present session; the difference between the paper and specie standard has diminished half; without shock to business or financial revulsion, gold has fallen from 180 to 10 per cent premium, and almost gained the point of departure.” At the beginning of his second term of Congress, his mastery of economical and financial subjects was recognized in his appointment on the Committee of Ways and Means; by careful and exhaustive study of the questions that came before him, and by the force of argument with which he sustained his conclusions on the floor, he proved himself one of the ablest members of this important committee; he was continued upon the Committee of Ways and Means during the remainder of his Congressional service; after his election to the 45th Congress, the grave question arose as to the method of counting the Electoral votes; a committee was appointed to inquire into the privileges, powers and duties of the House of Representatives; he was appointed on that committee, and presented, on behalf of the Republican members, a minority report; he brought forth other important measures, one relating to the laws of internal revenue, another bill authorizing the receiving of postal saving deposits, a bill which authorized the Secretary of the Treasury to receive saving deposits through the money-order post offices; the latter received favorable report from the Committee of Ways and Means, and was placed upon the general calendar, and was not reached for action on the House calendar. In February, 1879, Mr. Burchard received the appointment of Director of the United States Mints, and entered upon the duties of his office on the 5th of the following month. In politics, he is a firm and consistent Republican, and to the support of his party brings abilities of no mean order, and the prestige of an honorable reputation and unsullied record. Mr. Burchard was united in marriage May 15, 1861, to Miss Jane Lawver, daughter of M. Lawver, an old and honored resident of Stephenson Co.; they have one son — Edward Lawver, born Sept. 5, 1867.

JESSE BURCHARD, of the firm of Burchard & Scott, wholesale and retail dealers in hardware, iron and carriage stock, 119 Stephenson street; is a native of Oneida Co., N. Y., and was born Dec. 9, 1830; when 10 years of age, his parents came West to Beloit, Wis., in 1840, and he grew up to manhood in that State; he came to Stephenson Co. and located in Freeport in 1862, and engaged in the hardware trade, the firm being H. C. Burchard & Brother, he having the active management of the business; Mr. Burchard has successfully carried on the business for the past seventeen years; in 1875, the firm became Burchard & Scott; they have a large wholesale and retail trade, they carry a large stock, and are one of the heaviest mercantile firms in this section of the State. Mr. Burchard was united in marriage May 29, 1866, to Miss Lizzie C. Fry, daughter of Hon. C. J. Fry, of this city; they have four children — Charles J., George H., Mary E. and Fannie.

J. C. BURBANK, homoeopathic physician and surgeon; office, Munn's Block, corner of Stephenson and Van Buren streets; is a native of Bradford Co., Penn., and was born in the town of Towanda; he grew up and received his education in that State: he studied medicine, and graduated at the Pennsylvania Homoeopathic Medical College in 1856; he is also a graduate of the Pennsylvania Hospital; he came West to Illinois in 1856, and located at Polo, Ogle Co., and practiced his profession there until 1869, when he removed to Janesville, Wis.; in 1873, he came to Freeport, and since then has practiced his profession here. Dr. Burbank has held the position of Vice President of the Illinois Homoeopathic Medical Society; while living in Ogle Co., held various town and school offices; he has no taste for office, and devotes his whole energies to his profession. Dr. Burbank was united in marriage, Jan. 19, 1860, to Miss Martha M. Belding, a native of Bradford Co., Penn.; they have four children — Hattie B., Wilbur A., Fred and Roy: they have lost one daughter, Sophia.

JOHN BURRELL, of the firm of Emmert & Burrell, wholesale and retail dealers in drugs, medicines, paints and oils, No. Ill Stephenson street; is a native of Westmoreland Co., Penn., and was born Feb. 20, 1830; he grew up and attended school there; after reaching manhood, he came West to Illinois, and located in Stephensi n Co. in the spring of 1851; he entered a drug store as clerk the first year, and the following year he became a partner in the store, and has been connected with the business for twenty-eight years, and, with one exception, is the oldest merchant in the city. He has held the offices of Supervisor and Collector, and school offices. In 1853, Mr. Burrell was united in marriage to Miss Augusta E. Burnside, a native of Indiana; they have three children — Florence (now Mrs. S. Hermanns, of Morris, Ill.), Lillian A. and William Burnside.

BURRELL BROTHERS, wholesale and retail dealers in groceries and provisions, 110 Stephenson street; the firm is composed of Lewis F., Henry and Daniel W.; the business was established in 1856 by Lewis F., the senior member of the present firm. He is a native of Westmoreland Co., Penn., and came to Stephenson Co. in 1850; he carried on the business until 1870, when he went to Chicago, and became connected with the extensive printing, binding and stationery house of Culver, Page & Hoyne, and since then has been a member of that firm, still retaining his interest in the firm of Burrell Brothers. Henry Burrell is a native of Westmoreland Co., Penn., and came to Freeport in 1850; he grew up to manhood here, and learned the tinner's trade; he was engaged in the hardware trade in Winnebago Co. for eight years; he became a member of the present firm in 1874; during the war, he enlisted in Company G, 15th Regiment, I. V. I., and served two years; participated in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth and Vicksburg; he was commissioned Lieutenant, and served in that position in the 6th Miss. Reg. Colored Infantry; he was afterward promoted and commissioned Captain of Co. F, 142d I. V. I., and commanded that company until the close of the war. He was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Steves, a native of Winnebago Co., in 1867. Daniel W. is a native of Pennsylvania, and came here with his parents in 1850; he grew up to manhood here, and has had a large practical experience in the grocery business.

REV. D. B. BYERS, Pastor of the Evangelical Church; is a native of Ashland Co., Ohio, and was born Feb. 5, 1835; he grew up to manhood, and received his education in Ohio and Illinois; he entered the ministry in 1856; he came to Freeport in 1859; besides preaching here many years, has served eight years as Presiding Elder. Mr. Byers has been successfully engaged in the ministry for the past twenty-four years. Mr. Byers was united in marriage to Miss Susan E. Barshinger, from Pennsylvania, April 5, 1859; they have six children.

DR. W. S. CALDWELL, physician and surgeon, 122 Stephenson St.; is a native of Southern Kansas, and was born Aug. 8, 1832; his father, Abner Caldwell, belongs to the celebrated Caldwell family, and he was an own cousin to John C. Calhoun. When fourteen years of age, Dr. Caldwell went to Michigan, where he completed his literary course; then began his extended course in the study of medicine at the University of Michigan; he also pursued the study of medicine and surgery in Cincinnati, Philadelphia, New York, Berlin, Vienna, Paris and London. Dr. Caldwell came to Jo Daviess Co., in 1856, with only $20 in his pocket; he taught school one winter, then engaged in the practice of his profession at Elizabeth, where he remained fifteen years; then removed to Warren, where he remained seven years, and built up a large and very successful practice; in April, 1877, he went abroad and spent two years in Europe, pursuing his studies in Berlin, Vienna, Paris and London; upon his return, in June, 1879, he located in Freeport, and since then, within one year, has a larger and more successful practice than any physician outside of Chicago. Dr. Caldwell has received five diplomas from different medical institutions; he is a great student, and devoted to the interests of his profession.

M. D. CHAMBERLIN, dealer in hats, caps, furs and gents' furnishing goods, Stephenson street, corner Chicago street; is a native of Onondaga Co., N. Y., and was born Aug. 23, 1829; he grew up to manhood in that State; he came West to Illinois, and located in Freeport, in 1853, and established his present business; he has carried on the business for twenty seven years, and is, with one exception, the oldest merchant in Freeport, and is the oldest dealer in hats, caps and gents' furnishing goods in this section of the Sfcate; he carries a full stock of the best and most standard goods, and has the leading established trade. Mr. Chamberlin was united in marriage, Jan. 3, 1855, to Miss Louise V. Loveland, a native of Hartford, Conn.; they have six children, three sons and three daughters.

JAMES B. CHILDS, deceased; was a native of the State of Pennsylvania, and was born in Bucks Co., in May, 1815; he grew up to manhood there, and learned the trade of cabinet and sash maker; he came West to Illinois, and settled in Stephenson Co. in 1842, and began working at his trade; he bought land on Stephenson street, and improved it. In November, 1853, he was united in marriage to Miss Hannah D. Reel, a native of Chester Co., Penn; she came to this county in 1852. Mr. Childs was engaged in building, and made substantial improvements to the city; he was honored with many offices of trust, having been elected a member of the Board of Supervisors, Assessor and School Treasurer, and other town and school offices; he was identified with the interests of the city and county until his death, which occurred in 1868; he left one daughter — Anna M., now Mrs. John V. Vickers. Mrs. Childs has lived in her present location, corner Galena and Mechanic streets, since 1853.

SILAS D. CLARK, Galena Ave.; is a native of Bennington Co., Vt., and was born April 14, 1810; he grew up from early boyhood in the State of New York, and lived there until he came West in 1849, to Stephenson Co., and located in Freeport; he engaged in mercantile business, and continued in trade here for some years; he also engaged in contracting and building railroads. Mr. Clark entered from Government a part of the farm where he now lives, within the city limits. He has held the office of City Alderman. In 1833, he was united in marriage to Miss Emily Keith, a native of Herkimer Co., N. Y.; they' have one son — George W., engaged in the grain trade here, and have lost one son — Russell.

GILBERT M. CLAYTON, dealer in toys and fancy goods, Stephenson St.; is a native of New York City, and was born Feb. 22, 1826; he grew up and attended school there; when 17 years of age, he came West with his parents to Chicago, when that city contained only 8,000 people; he entered the extensive mercantile house of Alexander White & Co., who were then, and for many years, the largest dealers in paints and oils in that city, or west of it; he remained with this house for ten years; he came to Freeport in 1853, and established the same character of business; he had, besides his own capital, an unlimited letter of credit from Alexander White & Co.; he bought carefully, and, with his large experience and energy, built up an extensive trade; he carried on the business for twenty five years, and was noted for his enterprise and liberality; he built one of the finest dwellings in the city; in aiding others he became embarrassed in business, and was obliged to suspend; the letters received from his creditors bore high testimony to his business integrity. In 1849, Mr. Clayton was united in marriage to Miss Catharine C. Miller, from Rahway, N. J.; they have five children — Sylvester, Joseph, Addie, Freddie and John Middleton.

JUDGE JOHN COATES, attorney and counselor at law, Exchange St., opposite court house; is a native of Lycoming Co., Penn., and was born June 23, 1819; he grew up and attended school there, and after reaching manhood came West to Illinois, in 1845, and began reading law; he came to Stephenson Co. in 1847, and the following year, in the spring of 1848, was admitted to the bar; after being admitted, he engaged in the practice of law. In 1853, he was elected County Judge of Stephenson Co., and held that office four years; he has held the offices of City Attorney, Justice of the Peace, County Attorney and Supervisor. Judge Coates was united in marriage, Nov. 10, 1856, to Mrs. Ellen V. Carroll, a native of Princeton, N. J., and widow of Rev. James W. Carroll, Presbyterian minister. Judge Coates is, with one exception, the oldest attorney in practice in this county. Judge Coates has, for a great many years, been a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church; he helped to organize the Second Presbyterian Church, and was, for many years, one of its strongest supporters. Judge and Mrs. Coates have one daughter — Helen J., now in Europe, completing her musical education; she graduated at a seminary in Pennsylvania in 1877, then went abroad, and, for one and a half years, studied music in Dresden, and is now in Switzerland.

ROWELL COLBY, residence corner Walnut and Clay Sts.; is a native of Grafton Co., N. H., and was born March 20, 1809; he grew up in that State. After reaching manhood, in 1833, he was united in marriage to Miss Abigail Livingston, daughter of Maj. William Livingston, of Massachusetts. In 1835, Mr. Colby went to Rochester, N. Y., and was in business there ten years; in 1845, he came West on an exploring trip, traveled through thirteen States, and upon his return figured up his expense, and the whole amount for the trip was only $25, such was the hospitality of the people; he says that he did not beg nor steal. Mr. and Mrs. Colby came West in a covered wagon, to Stephenson Co. and located permanently in December, 1849; he did not have a surplus dollar in the world; the first year he had to walk three miles to work, and only got 50 cents a day, and had to take his pay in trade; he began making a farm in Silver Creek Township; he has cut and carted hay and sold it for $1.50 per ton; he made one of the finest improved and most valuable farms in Stephenson Co.; he continued farming until a few years ago; since then he has lived here in the city. Mr. Colby is a consistent member of the M. E. Church, and is an ardent advocate of temperance; he has written a series of able and convincing articles on temperance and other subjects. Mr. and Mrs. Colby have had seven children, five of whom survive — Edward L., a merchant in Freeport; Albert H., engaged in farming in this county; Leonard W., attorney at law, Beatrice, Neb.; David R., Abbie J., now Mrs. Dr. Foster, of New York.

ALBERTUS COLLMANN, wholesale dealer in leaf tobacco, corner Adams and Clay Sts.; is a native of Germany, and was born in the Kingdom of Hanover, Nov. 27, 1828; after reaching manhood he came to the United States, in 1849, and came to Stephenson Co. in the fall of the same year, and began making a farm; he continued farming until 1865, when he came to the city and engaged in mercantile business, and buying and selling tobacco; he sells .his tobacco in the Eastern markets, and exports to Hamburg and Bremen; Mr. Collmann is a member of the banking firm of M. Hettinger, Collmann Bros. & Co.; he is a stockholder and Director in the German Insurance Co.; he is a large landholder in Iowa, owning several large farms there under cultivation; he had very little when he came here, and owes his success to his own efforts and good management. He married Miss Henrietta Janssen, a native of Hanover, Germany; they have six children — Gelle, Rosa, Onnie, George, Willie and Alice.

C. O. COLLMANN, of the banking house of M. Hettinger, Collmann Brothers & Company, Chicago street, north of Galena avenue; is a native of Germany, and was born in the Kingdom of Hanover Nov. 1, 1822; he grew up to manhood there and came to the United States in June, 1850; he came West to Illinois, and located in Stephenson Co. the same year, and engaged in farming in Ridott Township; he continued farming until 1866, when he came to Freeport and engaged in mercantile business; he continued the business nine years; in 1876, he engaged in the banking business, and became a member of the present firm upon its organization. Mr. Collmann is a stockholder and Director in the German Insurance Company; he has held the position of Vice President of the company two years, and was elected President of the company two years; he has held the position of Treasurer of the company for the past six years. In 1855, Mr. Collmann was united in marriage to Miss Aafke Rademaker, a native of Hanover, Germany; they have nine children — Rosa, John, Lena, Maggie, Jennie, Orville, Willie, Harry and Charlie.

J. A. COTTON, freight and ticket agent of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad; is a native of Greene Co., Penn., and was born March 13, 1835; during early boyhood his parents moved to Zanesville, Ohio; he came to Rockford, Ill., in 1852; he began railroading in 1857, with the Racine & Mississippi Railroad; he was agent for the road at Durand, at Davis, at Delavan and at Freeport, and was afterward appointed Division Superintendent from Freeport to Rock Island; when the present corporation came in control of this road, he became connected with the Rockford, Rock Island & St. Louis Railroad, as agent at Rock Island, and was then appointed general agent of the line at St. Louis, and remained there several years, when he returned to Freeport and accepted his present position; he is one of the oldest officials connected with the road. In 1860, Mr. Cotton was united in marriage to Miss Minerva Coshun, a native of New York; they have three daughters — Lizzie, Maggie and Emma.

A. B. CRANDELL, proprietor of Crandell's Commercial College, Stephenson street, corner Adams; is a native of Mercer Co., Ill., and was born Aug. 5, 1858; he grew up and received his education in this State, completing his commercial course at the Davenport Business College, and afterward engaged in teaching; he came to Freeport in 1879, and on the first of January became proprietor of the school.

HENRY DAVIS, of the firm of Mernitz & Davis, blacksmiths and wagonmakers, Bridge street, is a native of Stephenson Co., and was born in Freeport Aug. 14, 1850; he grew up and learned his trade here; he continued working at his trade until recently, when he associated with Mr. Mernitz and engaged in their present business, in 1876, he married Miss Lizzie Koyni, of this city; they have two children — Walter and Emma.

L. M. DEVORE, manufacturer of the Stover wind-mill and Devore's rotary feed grinder, corner Stephenson and Walnut streets; is a native of Bedford Co., Penn., and was born July 4, 1845; his parents came to Stephenson Co. in 1854; he grew up and attended school here. Upon the breaking-out of the rebellion, he entered the service; he was so young they would not allow him to go in the ranks; he was with the 46th I. V. I; then served as Colonel's orderly in the 71st I. V. I.; he afterward enlisted, and served in Company G, 149th Ohio V. I.; he was wounded in the battle of Monocacy Junction. After the war, he returned here, and in 1876 engaged in the agricultural implement business; in 1877, he was connected with and had an interest in the Stover Wind Engine Company; in 1878, he established his present business, and is building up a large trade; he has held the office of Justice of the Peace. In 1868, Mr. Devore was united in marriage to Miss Julia B. Higley, a native of Vermont; they have three children — Edith, Julia and Mabel.

JOSEPH EMMERT, of the firm of Emmert & Burrell, wholesale and retail dealers in drugs, medicines, paints and oils, No. 111 Stephenson street; is a native of Lebanon Co., Penn., and was born March 13, 1831; in early boyhood, removed to Center Co., and grew up and attended school there; after reaching manhood, he came West to Illinois, and located in Freeport in 1855, and engaged in the drug trade; the business was established by his brother, John S. Emmert, in 1846; Emmert's drug store is well known throughout the county and this section of the State, and the house has a large established trade; Mr. Emmert has been connected with the house a quarter of a century. In 1862, Mr. Emmert was united in marriage to Miss Mary Cochran, a native of” Pittsburgh, Penn.; she came to Freeport in 1859.

W. EMMERT, manufacturer of the Climax churn and step-ladders, Manufacturers Island; is a native of Lebanon Co., Penn., and was born July 7, 1833; he grew up and attended school in Center Co., and learned the trade of carriage-maker; after reaching manhood, he came West to Illinois, and arrived in Freeport in May, 1854; in 1861, he engaged in the hardware trade, and continued for four years; he ran a tug boat on the Pecatonica River for two years; in 1868, he engaged in his present business, and has successfully carried it on for the past twelve years, and has built up a large trade; when he began life he had nothing, and owes his success to his own efforts. In 1855, Mr. Emmert was united in marriage to Miss Sarah L. Mease, a native of Pennsylvania; they have four children — Carrie J., Wesley, Mollie and William.

ADOLPH F. ERFERT, with Beyer & Seyfarth; was born in Germany Oct. 3, 1848; he grew up there; after reaching manhood, he came to the United States in 1871, and came to Freeport the same year. He married Miss Maggie Ellen Long, a native of this State, Feb. 18, 1876; they have one son - Henry.

JOHN ERFERT, dealer in groceries and provisions, 48 Stephenson street; is a native of Prussia, Germany, and was born Jan. 14, 1835; he came to the United States in 1853, and came to Stephenson Co. in 1857; after remaining a short time, went to Kansas, then came to Monroe, Wis., and lived there two years; in 1861, he located permanently in Freeport, and in 1866 engaged in his present business, and has successfully carried it on for the past fourteen years, and has built up a good trade; he had nothing when he reached this country, and owes his success to his own efforts. He has held the office of Assistant Supervisor, and is a Director in the German Insurance Company and a member of the Finance Committee; he is prominently identified with the order of I. O. O. F., and has been Grand Representative to the Grand Lodge for many years. Mr Erfert was united in marriage Nov. 18, 1860. to Miss Nettie Mueller, a native of Hanover, Germany; they have seven children — Fred, Ida, Alma, Birdie, Nettie, Walter and Clara.

JOHN H. FARINGER, Galena avenue, south of Stephenson street; is a native of York Co., Penn., and was born June 23, 1832; he grew up in that State and came to Freeport in 1854, and learned his trade here; in 1857, he returned to Pennsylvania; in 1865, he again came to Freeport and engaged in his present business, and has carried it on since then. In Feb., 1862, he married Miss Mary Spotts, from York Co., Penn.; they have eight children — John F., Mary E., Henry E., Ida J., Albert W., Tillie, Hattie and Mabel.

E. C. FITCH, bakery and confectionery, 151 Stephenson street; is a native of Columbia Co., N. Y., and was born in 1827; he grew up in that State; after reaching manhood, in 1853, he went to California; remained there five years, and came to Freeport in 1858, and engaged in the grain business; in 1861, engaged in railroading; was connected with the Racine & Mississippi and the Western Union Railroads for six-teen years, and held the position of Ticket Agent for ten years. Mr. Fitch married Miss Margaret Bonner, a native of Massachusetts; they have four children — Harriet, Albert, Edward and Nellie; they have lost two children — Benjamin and Margaret.

JOHN FITZ, dealer in fresh and salted meats, Galena avenue, between Galena and Stephenson streets; is a native of Austria, and was born June 14, 1832; he grew up to manhood there, and came to the United States in 1864; lived in St. Louis and in Pennsylvania, and came to this county in 1867, and located in Freeport; he engaged in his present business, and has carried it on since then; has a good trade. He married Miss Louise Brel, a native of Germany, Jan. 25, 1869; they have three children — Albin, August and Alma.

FRED FL.ACHTEMEIER, proprietor Freeport Marble and Stone Works, dealer in foreign and American marble, corner Galena and Adams streets, Chicago; is a native of Germany, and was born July 5, 1851; he grew up and learned the trade of stone cutter; he came to the United States in 1868, and came to Freeport the same year, and began working at his trade in 1875; he engaged in stone-cutting business, and in 1878, established the Freeport Marble and Stone Works, and is building up a large trade in this city and county, and in adjoining counties. He is a member of Freeport Lodge, No. 239, I. O. O. F., and also of the Germania society. In 1874, he was united in marriage to Miss Minnie VVittbaker, a native of this city; they have one daughter — Ada Louise.

JOHN F. FRANZ, of Franz Bros. & Co., dealers in dry goods and groceries; is a native of Stephenson Co., and was born in Freeport, March 25, 1856; he grew up and attended school here, and completed his education in Chicago and Milwaukee. In 1872, he engaged in mercantile business with his father; he has the active management of the business. He was united in marriage, Sept. 9, 1879, to Miss Johanna Schaedle, a native of Stephenson Co.

D. FRANZ, of the firm of Franz Bros. & Co., dealers in dry goods and groceries, corner Galena and Chicago streets; is a native of Germany, and was born Sept. 29, 1822; he emigrated to the United States in 1840, and came to Stephenson Co. and settled in Freeport, in April, 1853, and has lived here twenty-seven years; in 1865, he engaged in mercantile business, and has successfully carried on the business for the past fifteen years. When Mr. Franz came to this country he had nothing. He owes his success in life to his own efforts and good management; he owns the brick block corner Chicago and Galena streets, two good farms and other property. On May, 1850, Mr. Franz married Miss Catharine Grosell, a native of Alsace, France; they have nine children, four sons and five daughters.

PHILIP FREIDAG, of the firm of Freidag & Molher, manufacturers and dealers in harness, saddles and collars, 59 Stephenson street; is a native of Genesee Co., N. Y., and was born in April 5, 1843; his parents came to Stephenson Co. in 1850; he grew up and learned his trade here; he engaged in business for himself in 1869, and has built up a good trade. During the war he enlisted in the 46th I. V. I., Co. C, and served until the close of the war. In August, 1870, Mr. Freidag was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Knecht, of this city; they have three children — Herman, Lizzie and Willie.

THOMAS FRENCH, residence corner Galena street and Galena avenue; is a native of Burlington Co., N. J., and was born Dec. 12, 1815; he grew up to manhood and lived there until he came West to Illinois, and located in Freeport in September, 1854; he engaged in the hotel business, and continued successfully in that business until 1872; he has lived on the corner of Galena street and Galena avenue a quarter of a century; his success in life is owing to his own efforts. In October, 1853, Mr. French was united in marriage to Miss Sarah B. Winchester, of Pennsvlvania; they have two children — one son, William L. D., attorney at law in this city, and one daughter, Ida I. engaged in teaching music.

PHILIP FRONING, physician and surgeon, corner Galena street and Galena avenue; is a native of Prussia, Germany, and was born April 29, 1827; he grew up and received his education there, and studied medicine and graduated in a college of pharmacy in 1850; he came to the United States in 1855, and came to Stephenson Co. and located in Freeport in 1856, and engaged in the drug business; in 1865, he went to Germany and took a special course in medicine, and graduated at “The University of Bonn,” Prussia, May 16, 1866; since then he has successfully practiced his profession here; he built the block on the corner of Galena avenue and Galena street in 1869. He has held the office of Town Physician for six years. In 1855, he was united in marriage to Miss Maria Zenke, from Bremen, Germanv; they have three children — Christian, Adolph and Matilda.

J. N. GALLOWAY, of the firm of Galloway & Snooks, proprietors of the Freeport Soda Water Manufactory, corner Jackson and Walnut streets; is a native of Lycoming Co., Penn., and was born April 22, 1837; he came to Stephenson Co. and located in Freeport March 22, 1858; he associated with W. H. Snooks, and engaged in their present business in 1873; they have an increasing demand for their goods here and in several adjoining counties, and have a good trade. In 1862, Mr. Galloway was united in marriage to Miss Mary J. Snyder, a native of St. Joseph Co., Mich.; they have two children — Ida and Jennie. Mr. Galloway is a member of Excelsior Lodge, A., F. & A. M.

S. B. GARDNER, passenger conductor C. &. N. W. R. R.; residence Carroll street; is a native of Erie Co., Penn., and was born Aug. 14, 1836; his parents came West to Illinois in 1844; after reaching manhood he began railroading, on the old Galena & Chicago R. R., now the C. & N. W. R. R., and worked upon the construction of the road when it was built; he run a freight train on this road for twelve years, and during that time he only laid off once, and then only for ten days, on account of sickness; there are very few now connected with this great corporation that were with it when Mr. Gardner first entered its employ; he came to Freeport to reside July 1, 1867. Mr. Gardner was united in marriage to Miss Esther Wright, a native of Syracuse, N. Y., Feb. 5, 1859; they have two sons — Friend J. and Freddie Day.

JAY S. GATES, proprietor Brewster House, corner Mechanic and Stephenson streets, Freeport.

T. S. GEMMILL, Assistant Postmaster, Freeport; is a native of York Co., Penn., and was born Jan. 21, 1830; he grew. up and attended school there; after reaching manhood, he came to Stephenson Co., in 1 853, and engaged in teaching school; the following year he entered the post office, and was appointed Assistant Postmaster by F. W. S. Brawley; he has held that position for twenty-six years, and is one of the oldest Government officials in the State. In October, 1870, Mr. Gemmill was united in marriage to Miss Maggie G. Baird, a native of Lycoming Co., Penn.; they have two children — Laura M. and Lizzie Edna.

BENJAMIN GODDARD, retired; residence, Webster street; was born in Grafton Co., N. H., July 22, 1804; his parents removed to Vermont when he was 2 years of age, and he grew up there; after reaching manhood he went to St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., in 1825. A few years after that, on the 31st of May, 1829, he was united in marriage to Miss Mercy Ann Pierce, a native of Grafton, N. H.; she came to New York when 10 years of age; they came West by wagon to Iowa, and were seven weeks on the way, and arrived in this county in December, 1835, and located about three miles from Freeport; built a log house, and began making a farm; they were among the very earliest settlers; there were plenty of Indians, and Mrs. Goddard tells of how they used to come to the house when she was all alone, and want bread and moat, and more than once they understood that she was not frightened, and would not give them all the food in the house; after living there three years, they moved to where the city is now located, and Mr. Goddard built the first house that was built in Freeport; he had a farm adjoining the present town site; they kept hotel for some years, it being the old Stage House; he bought a saw-mill and run it about twenty years; in 1860, he engaged in the flouring-mill business, and since then he has been interested in that business, which is now managed by his son. Mr. and Mrs. Goddard are the oldest living settlers of Freeport; there is no one living now that was here when they came; when they first came, he only had his team and the little furniture they brought with them; he now owns 170 acres of good land adjoining the city limits, besides city property; owes his success to his own efforts; he has seen good winter wheat sell for 25 cents per bushel; he relates of a man named Hill who carted a load of wheat to Chicago, and his expenses for the trip were $9 more than he got for the wheat. Mr. and Mrs. Goddard have four children — Miriam (now Mrs. Frisbie), Alpheus P., Benjamin E. and Byron S.; they lost one son — Franklin.

A. P. GODDARD, proprietor of Goddard's Flouring Mills; residence on Webster street; is a son of Benjamin and Mercy Pierce Goddard, the oldest living settlers of the City of Freeport, and was born in Franklin Co., N. Y., Aug. 29, 1833; he came with his parents by wagon from that State to Illinois; they arrived here in December, 1835; though he was only 2 years of age, he remembers coming; his parents located three miles from Freeport for several years, and in 1838 they moved from where they lived to where the town is now located; he grew up to manhood and has lived here since then, except a short time in Iowa. During the war he enlisted in the 93d I. V. I., and was commissioned 1st Lieutenant of Co. D; he participated in the siege of Vicksburg, and in the battles of Jackson and Champion Hill; after serving two years he was obliged to resign his commission on account of ill health. He returned, built a mill, and engaged in the milling business, and has so continued since then; in 1875 he was elected Mayor of the city, and re-elected in 1876, and held that office two years; he has also held the office of City Alderman and County Supervisor. In October, 1866, Mr. Goddard was united in marriage to Miss Mercy Pierce, a native of New York; they have three children — Hannah F., Alpheus T. and Jennie May.

THOMAS F. GOODHUE, attorney-at-law and Justice of the Peace, corner Stephenson and Exchange streets; is a native of Belfast, Me., and was born Aug. 9, 1812; he grew up to manhood and received his education in New England; he studied law in Troy, N. Y., and was admitted to the bar in Albany, in October, 1838; he engaged in the practice of law in the city of New York, and continued four years; he came West, to Illinois, and arrived in Stephenson Co. in May, 1842; he settled in Freeport, and engaged in the practice of law. A few years after coming here, in 1846, he married Miss Mary Strocky, a native of Germany; they have four children — Charles F., Kate, Robert and Jennie. Mr. Goodhue has practiced law in this county thirty-eight years, a greater length of time than any attorney now in practice here, and there are very few who remember as many incidents of the early days of litigation in this county as he; he has held the offices of City Attorney and Justice of the Peace.

GRANT BROTHERS, brick manufacturers, Galena avenue.

A. T. GREEN, attorney and counselor at law, corner Exchange and Stephenson streets; is a native of Orange Co., N. Y., and was born Aug. 6, 1815; he grew up and learned the tailor's trade. After reaching manhood he came West to Illinois, and arrived in Stephenson Co., Oct. 10, 1839; he walked from Rockford, and just before he came to the village of Freeport he stopped on the hill and sat on a stump; he counted forty roofs of all kinds, and it was all the town then contained. He began working at the tailor's trade. A few years after coming here, in 1845, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Ordway, a native of New Hampshire; he afterward studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1854. He was appointed Postmaster, under President Tyler, in 1843, and held that office during the administration of President Polk. Mr. Green was an early advocate of the free school system, and has always been prominently identified with educational interests since then. There are only two or three here now that were here when he came. His wife, Mrs. Green, died in 1851; subsequently, in 1856, he was married to Miss Orissa B. Richards, of the same place. Mr. Green has three sons — Charles T., attorney-at-law; Edward B., in store here; William A., in a bank at Lincoln, Neb. During the war, Charles enlisted and served in the 17th I. V. C, Co. M. and was afterward transferred to the Government Naval Academy.

J. A. GRIMES, proprietor of the Farmer's Store, and dealer in dry goods, groceries and provisions, Stephenson street, between Adams and Mechanic; is a native of Holmes Co., Ohio, and was born Oct. 20, 1837; his parents came to Stephenson Co. in 1849, and he grew up and attended school here. After reaching manhood he engaged in the grain trade, and has been engaged in business here since then. He was elected and served as a member of the Board of Supervisors. Mr. Grimes was united in marriage to Miss Mary Cornelius, a native of Pennsylvania, June 1, 1862; they have one daughter — Effie E.

L. W. GUITEAU, cashier of the Second National Bank, Freeport; is a native of New York State, and was born in Utica, Oneida Co., March 3, 1810; he grew up to manhood in that State. He came to Michigan, and engaged in mercantile business at Ann Arbor; remained there a short time; in 1838, he came to Illinois, and settled in Freeport in the month of October of that year; he engaged in the mercantile business near where the depot is now located. In 1840, he was appointed Postmaster under President Harrison, and held that office several years. In 1841, Mr. Guiteau became embarrassed in his business; but he paid all of his creditors in full, though he sacrificed all he had in doing so. He entered the post office, and, after serving there for some time, was appointed Deputy Clerk of the Circuit Court, and was afterward elected Clerk of that court, and held that office four years, and declined to become a candidate for re-election. He was afterward appointed, and served again as Deputy Clerk. Upon the organization of the Second National Bank he became book-keeper, and served in that capacity for one year, and then was elected cashier of the bank in April, 1865, and since then has occupied that position. Mr. Guiteau is a man of unswerving integrity, and enjoyed the confidence of the President and Board of Directors of the bank to such an extent that for a long time he has had the responsible management of the bank. Mr. Guiteau was elected the First County Commissioner of Schools. He was instrumental in organizing here the union system of graded schools, this being the second place in the State to adopt this system, Chicago being the first and Freeport the second. He was also the first Police Magistrate elected in the city. In 1833, Mr. Guiteau was united in marriage to Miss Jane Howe, daughter of Maj. John Howe, of Antwerp, Jefferson Co., N. Y.; she died in 1848; in 1854, he was married to his present wife, Maria Blood, of Cazenovia, N. Y.; he has four children.

FRED GUND, Secretary of the German Insurance Company; office, corner Exchange and Bridge streets, is a native of Germany, and was born in the Grand Duchy of Baden, Nov. 13, 1846; his parents came to Stephenson Co. in 1848; he grew up and attended school here. After reaching manhood, upon the organization of the German Insurance Company, he was elected Secretary of the company in 1867; since then he has held that position, and has managed the affairs of the company with great ability, and through his energetic and successful management the company has reached a very prosperous condition.

F. W. HANCE, physician and surgeon, Stephenson street, west of Walnut; is a native of Belmont Co., Ohio, and was burn July 3, 1825; he grew up to manhood and received his education in that State, completing his literary course at Franklin College, Athens, Ohio; he studied medicine and graduated at the University of Pennsylvania in 1849; after graduating, he practiced medicine in Bridgeport, Ohio; he came to Illinois and located in Freeport in May, 1853, and engaged in the practice of medicine. Dr. Hance has practiced his profession here since then; he was elected Mayor of Freeport in 1861. In 1849, Dr. Hance was united in marriage to Miss Mary B. Chamberlain, a native of New York; she died Sept. 24, 1873.

CAPT. J. R. HARDING, clerk in railway mail service, is a native of Oxfordshire, England; he came to the United States in 1857, and came to Stephenson Co. the same year. Upon the breaking-out of the rebellion he enlisted under the first call for troops, in Co. A, 11th Regiment I. V. I.; he remained with the 11th Regiment until the fall of Vicksburg; he then was authorized to aid in raising a colored regiment, and was commissioned First Lieutenant; after serving only a few months was promoted and commissioned Captain; he was slightly wounded in the storming of Fort Blakeley. He remained in the service until February, 1866, and then returned here and engaged in the clothing business; he was appointed to his present position in the railway mail service in 1869. In 1864, Capt. Harding was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth A. Wurts, of this city; she died in May, 1879, leaving three children — Carrie, John and Nettie.

SAMUEL B. HARRIS, residence corner Stephenson and Foley streets, Freeport; is a native of Union Co., Penn., and was born Sept. 2, 1824; he came West to Illinois, and arrived in Stephenson Co. in March, 1848. The following year he was appointed Deputy Postmaster; he afterward, for many years, was engaged in selling goods and book keeping; in 1867, he was elected a member of the Board of Supervisors, and was again re-elected; he held that office two terms and declined a renomination; he was also engaged in the grain and lumber business. Mr. Harris was married June 11, 1850, to Miss Anna E. Van Dyke; she came here with her parents in 1843; they have three children— Jennie B., Carrie D. arid Anna B.; they have lost four children — James A., Linda, Bertie, and Lizzie D.

WILLIAM HARRIS, with Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul R. R.; residence corner Taylor avenue and Henderson street; was born in Cornwall Co., England, Nov. 15, 1817; he emigrated to America in 1854, and came to Freeport in 1860, and entered the employ of the railroad, and, except a short time, has been connected with the railroad here since then. In the spring of 1854, Mr. Harris was united in marriage to Miss Emma Harris, a native of Cornwall Co., England; they have two sons — William, engaged in business in this city, and Frank, at home. Mr. and Mrs. Harris have a very attractive home.

JACOB HARTMAN, contractor and builder; is a native of Union Co., Penn., and was born Feb. 1, 1820; his parents came to Sandusky Co., Ohio, when he was 10 years of age, and he grew up there and learned the trade of carpenter and joiner; he came west to Stephenson Co. in October of 1848, settled in Freeport, and began working at his trade; Mr. Hartman has been engaged in building for thirty-two years, and is the oldest in the business here. In August, 1852, Mr. Hartman was united in marriage to Miss Melvina Thomas, a native of York Co., Penn.; they have one daughter — Mary Lucinda, now Mrs. W. W. Sanderson, of this city; they have lost two sons — Jacob and George W.

JOHN HART, of the Farmers' Association, corner Stephenson and Adams streets; is a native of Indiana, and was born April 22, 1831; his father came to this county in 1836, and the family all came in April, 1837, and were among the earliest settlers; he grew up to manhood here and engaged in farming; he continued farming and stock-raising until 1877, when he came in the city; he was elected to his present position of Superintendent and Manager of the Farmers' Co-operative Association in 1879. He has held the office of Highway Commissioner, and was elected a member of the Board of Supervisors, and held that office several terms. During the war he enlisted, Aug. 30, 1862, in the 46th I. V. I., and served until the close of the war, and was mustered out June 19, 1865; there were five brothers of them in the service, and all returned safe and unhurt. In April, 1852, Mr. Hart was united in marriage to Miss Rebecca A. Sheetz, a native of Pennsylvania; they have three children — Albert W., Orton and Maurice.

D. M. HART, of the firm of Kundinger & Hart, dealers in clothing and gentlemen's furnishing goods, 123 Stephenson street; is a native of Stephenson Co., and was born Nov. 25, 1837; he grew up and attended school here; after reaching manhood, he entered a store as clerk, and afterward engaged in the grocery trade, and carried on that business for seven years; in 1874, he engaged in his present business, and the firm of Kundinger & Hart carry on a successful trade. Mr. Hart has lived in this county forty-three years, and is one of the oldest native-born citizens now living here. During the war he enlisted for three years, in Co. A, 46th I. V. I.; after serving
one year he was discharged, on account of disability. In 1858, he was united in marriage to Miss E. V. Best, a native of Pennsylvania; they have three children — Eva L., Walter E. and Arthur.

R. F. HAYES, homoeopathic physician and surgeon; office 105 Stephenson street; is a native of Union Co., Penn., and was born Feb. 29, 1832: he grew up to manhood and received his education in that State; he studied medicine and graduated at the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia, in 1858; the following year he came West to Illinois, and located in this county, and has practiced his profession many years. Dr. Hayes was united in marriage to Miss Annie R. Aurand, from Pennsylvania, July 4, 1861; they have three children — Harry A., Grace M. and Lalon Z.

E. HELLER, manufacturer and dealer in furs, hats and caps, No. 82 Stephenson street; is a native of Germany, and was born in Prussia June 4, 1824; he grew up to manhood there, and served apprenticeship to the furrier's trade; he came to this country in 1849; he engaged in manufacturing furs in Boston, and continued for seven years; he came West to Illinois and located in Freeport in March, 1857; in the fall of the same year he engaged in his present business; he went to New York and bought a stock of goods without any money — they trusted him because of his good character; he has carried on the business here over twenty-three years, and has occupied his present location twenty years; he began without anything, and, by industry and fair dealing, has established a good reputation and built up a good trade. In September, 1853. he married Miss Mary Ann Schoettle, from New York; they have six children — Emma, Alfred, Willie, Nettie, Edmund and Mamie.

J. W. HENNEY, of the firm of J. W. Henney & Co., manufacturers of carriages, buggies and road wagons, corner Bridge and Adams streets; is a native of Center Co., Penn., and was born Sept. 23, 1842; his parents came West to this county in 1848; after being here a short time they returned to Pennsylvania, and, in 1854, they came again to this county and located permanently. His father was a carriage maker, and he learned his trade of him, serving a thorough apprenticeship; he afterward worked eleven years in carriage paint works; in 1868, he established his present business at Cedarville, and successfully carried on the business there until December, 1879, when he removed his manufacturing business to this city. Mr. Henney was united in marriage, May 26, 1869, to Miss Agnes A. Bennethum, a native of Pennsylvania; they have two daughters — Lilly and Mamie, and have lost one son — Arthur.

MATHIAS HETTINGER, [illustration], senior member of the banking house of M. Hettinger, Collmann Brothers & Co., merchant; was born in Keffenach, Alsace-Loraine, France, Jan. 24, 1819, being the son of Joseph and Magdalena (Plugmacher) Hettinger; he was educated in his native place, and in 1836, in company with an elder brother, emigrated to America; they located at Williamsville, N. Y., where Mathias worked at the trade of wagon-making for two years, and then removed to Canton, Ohio; from this place he went to Portsmouth, Ohio, where he stayed three years, and engaged during this period in the manufacture of plows; in 1841, he removed to Freeport, Ill., and worked as journeyman at wagon-making for a short time, and during the same year started a shop on a small scale for manufacturing and repairing wagons, buggies, etc.; he added to this enterprise a blacksmith shop, and employed about seven hands; in the year 1845, he surrendered this business and purchased a brewery, known as the “Yellow Creek” brewery, and continued this establishment for twenty-two years; during this time some important changes occurred by the admission and retirement of one or two partners; Mr. Hettinger also, during this period, bought and cultivated a farm in the neighborhood; in 1865, he was prominently concerned in the formation of the German Insurance Company of Freeport, of which he was the first President; he was chosen to this position in 1866, and retained it until 1871, when he retired for two years; again, in 1873, he resumed this office, and now fills it; in 1867, he gave up the brewing business, in which he had made a fine reputation and amassed a fortune, and in 1870, in partnership with Francis Boekie, commenced to deal in grain; during this year Mr. Boekie retired, and Jacob Williams become a partner, the firm being known as Hettinger & Williams; the business was enlarged to include transactions in coal and salt; they shipped large quantities of ground feed to North Wisconsin and other points; in 1876, he engaged in the banking business, the firm being M. Hettinger, Collmann Brothers & Co.; Mr. Hettinger has been Supervisor of the town of Silver Creek and Freeport, as well as Alderman of the latter city; he was one of the committee appointed to erect the new Freeport Court House, and in all his public service has filled his duties with ability and fidelity. In 1845, he was married to Cordelia Torry, of Freeport, who died in 1851; in 1856, he was married to Elizabeth Gund, of Freeport.

C. M. HILLEBRAND, physician and surgeon, 125 Stephenson street. Is a native of Germany, and was born in Prussia, Feb. 2, 1842; he grew up and attended school there until 13 years of age, and came with his parents to America in 1855; they came to Stephenson Co. the same year; he completed his education and studied medicine, and finally graduated at the University of Berlin, in Prussia, in 1868; he returned to Freeport and engaged in the practice of medicine, and since then for the past twelve years has practiced his profession here. He has held the office of County Physician for many years. Dr. Hillebrand was united in marriage to Miss Carrie Wenzel, a native of Quincy, III., Dec. 31, 1868; they have five children — Fred, Lillie, Ella, Arthur and Homer; they have lost one daughter, Lydia.

JACOB HIME, proprietor Hime's Cooper Works, corner Jackson and Liberty streets; was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, Feb. 15, 1820; his parents came to this country in 1825; he lived in Pennsylvania and learned his trade there; he came to Stephenson Co. in May, 1848, and began working at his trade; he carried on the business until 1868, when he went to Grant Co., Wis., and engaged in manufacturing staves and in steam-boating, and carried on a large business; he returned to Freeport in May, 1877, and again established his present business and has a large, extensive trade; when he began he had nothing, but by industry and close attention to business has succeeded. He has held the office of City Alderman. He married Miss Saloma De Walt, a native of Pennsylvania, Feb. 7, 1841; they have five children — Amos, Jacob, Annestatia, Levi L. Anna O.; they have lost three children.

C M. HINELINE, contractor and builder, Galena street; is a native of Northampton Co., Penn., and was born Oct. 31, 1829; he grew up to manhood there and served apprenticeship as carpenter and joiner; he came west to Illinois and located in Freeport in December, 1855, and began working at his trade; he is, with one exception, the oldest builder now in business here, having been engaged in building for the past twenty-five years; he has erected some of the best buildings in Freeport. In 1850, Mr. Hineline was united in marriage to Miss Emma Lattig, a native of Easton, Penn.; they have had nine children, six of whom are living — Anna, Sarah, James, Harry, William and Emma.

JOHN HOEBEL, dealer in wines and liquors, No. 79 Stephenson street; is a native of Germany and was born in Rhenish-Bavaria Nov. 27, 1825; when a boy of only 14 years of age, he came alone to this country; he came West to Illinois from Logansport, Ind.; he came by team to Stephenson Co., and arrived in Freeport Aug. 18, 1842; the first man he spoke to after coming here was M. Hettinger; he was one of the early settlers here; he engaged in shoe-making and carried on that business for Borne years; he entered the hardware house of Fred Bartlett and remained with him about ten years, and afterward engaged in his present business; Mr. Hoebel has lived in Freeport thirty-eight years; there are few persons who recollect more distinctly the incidents of early days. He has been elected three times to the office of City Alderman, and has held the office of City Treasurer; he is a member of Freeport Lodge, I. O. O. F., and has been prominently connected with the order for many years; has held the position of Noble Grand, and was three times elected representative to the Grand Lodge of the State; he is also a member of Stephen A. Douglas Encampment, and was twice elected Representative to the Grand Encampment. Mr. Hoebel was united in marriage, Oct. 15, 1848, to Miss Catharine Baier, a native of Rhine- Bavaria, Germany; they have five children — Catharine, Philip, Mary, Maggie and Hans; they have lost two children.

DANIEL HOOVER, manufacturer of laundry and toilet soaps, north of the river; residence, Wyandot street; is a native of Franklin Co., and was born July 9, 1828; when 13 years of age, come to Ohio, and came to Ogle Co., Ill., in 1857; he came to this county in 1865. Just after coming here, he enlisted in the 15th I. V. L, Co. C, and served until the close of the war. In the spring of 1866, he established the soap business in a small way, gathering his grease with a wheelbarrow; he has continued in the business since then, and has built up a good trade; his factory was burned Jan. 28, 1880; he immediately rebuilt, and it was again destroyed by fire on Feb. 20, 1880; he has since rebuilt, and is in running order, and manufacturing 25,000 pounds monthly; he also carries on the rendering business. Mr. Hoover married Miss Rebecca Kirk, a native of Stark Co., Ohio, Sept. 22, 1853; they have seven children — Albert M., Cora A., Willis C, Frank E., Clara V., George W. and Myrtle.

M. HUBER, proprietor Western Brewery, Galena avenue; was born in Alsace, France, Oct. 24, 1838; he came to the United States when 12 years of age, and came to Freeport May 6, 1850; he grew up and has lived here over thirty years; he engaged in his present business in January, 1880. In 1859, he married Miss Susanna Wyant, a native of Prussia; they have six children — Mary, Emma, Susanna, Margaret, John and Frank.

H. C. HUTCHISON, City Clerk, Freeport; is a native of Center Co., Penn., and was born Sept. 30, 1835; he grew up and attended school there, and completed his education in Massachusetts; he engaged in teaching, and afterward in mercantile business, until the war; and during the war he was Military Transportation Agent at Jeffersonville, Ind.; he came to Freeport in 1865; has been engaged in book-keeping; was elected City Clerk in April, 1880. He married Miss Helen Smythe Nov. 25, 1862; she is a native of Center Co., Penn.

HOLLIS JEWELL, capitalist, residence, Stephenson street; was born at St. Albans, Franklin Co., Vt., Dec. 25, 1813; his parents were Hollis Jewell and Elizabeth (Goddard) Jewell; his education was derived from the public schools, supplemented by after study and observation. In 1831, when 18 years of age, he left his home with only $50, and went to Albion, N. Y., where he learned the trade of a carpenter, remaining there the succeeding three years; in 1835, he removed to Cleveland, Ohio, and for a year pursued his trade there; in 1837, he went to Chillicothe, Ohio, and was engaged in the building of the aqueduct over Flint Creek for the State Canal; finally, in 1840, he settled in Freeport, Ill., where he has since permanently resided. He established himself in business here as a wagon and buggy builder, an occupation in which he was engaged for ten years; in 1850, in consequence of bad health, he retired from active business life, and for several years was compelled to travel continuously, in order to regain his forces; in 1857, his health being improved, he turned his attention to real estate operations, the loaning of money, etc. He has devoted much, both of his time and means, to the support of the Methodist Church in Freeport, of which he is a zealous and active member. Two of the Methodist Churches of this city owe their existence and prosperity largely to him, while in the case of one of these, the Embury Methodist Episcopal Church, his services were so highly appreciated that it was deemed by the managers a fitting measure, to inscribe his name on the church bell. Starting away from home to begin life with only $50 in his pocket, Mr. Jewell, by his industry, integrity and liberality, though suffering from ill health over quarter of a century, has become one of Freeport' s most successful business men; though suffering constantly, his life has been one of good cheer to every one with whom he came in contact, and he has a helpful word for all. Soon after coming here, in 1842, Mr. Jewell married Mrs. Melinda Webb, formerly Miss Melinda Root, a native of New York State; she married Levi J. Webb in 1838; they came to Freeport the same year; he died in 1841, leaving two daughters, only one of whom survives, Sarah Amelia, now Mrs. J. H. Staver; Mary Adelia died June 29, 1847. Mr. and Mrs. Jewell have had three children, none of whom survive — Pathenia, died July 9, 1847; Francis, died Oct. 14, 1850; Rosalia, died Feb. 13, 1853.

THOMAS W. JOHNSON, retired, residence, Galena avenue; is a native of England, and was born Jan. 19, 1825; he came to the United States when only 14 years of age; landed in New Orleans, came up the river to Galena, and walked from Galena to Freeport, and arrived here in the spring of 1839; he grew up and attended school here, working his own way, sawing wood to pay for his schooling. His industry attracted the attention of Mr. D. A. Knowlton, a prominent citizen and a leading merchant of Freeport, and he offered him a situation as clerk in his store; he accepted it, and received $50 and his board as compensation the first year; he remained with Mr. Knowlton for eight years, saving his earnings and investing in real estate. In 1853, Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Emily Lezotte, she is a native of Vermont, but of French descent. Mr. Johnson was with Mr. George Maynard, now the oldest merchant in the city, and remained with him for eighteen years, a part of the time, having the entire charge of the business, which he successfully managed with acknowledged ability; his success in life is owing to his own efforts, his industry and integrity. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have two children — one son, Holland C, and one daughter, Althea C.; Mr. Johnson's parents are still living in England at an advanced age, and are both active and well.

F. L. JONES, proprietor of the 99-cent store, Stephenson street; is a native of Stephenson Co., and was born at Eleroy Oct. 6, 1853; he grew up and attended school here; after reaching manhood, he sold goods on the road for four years, and established his present business in 1879, and is building up a good trade; he is a member of Winnesheik Lodge, I. O. O. F., and also belongs to the encampment. Mr. Jones was united in marriage, Sept. 23d, 1878, to Miss A. V. Oilman, a native of Stephenson Co.; they have one daughter — Flora Imogene.

F. E. JOSEL, City Surveyor; is a native of Austria, and was born June 26, 1840; he grew up and attended school there, and completed his education in engineering and architecture in Vienna, Austria; he came to the United States in 1866, and the following year came to Freeport; he has been engaged in surveying and engineering; he was elected County Surveyor and held that office four years; he was elected City Surveyor in 1875, and is now serving his fourth term in that office; Mr. Josel has had large experience in his profession; has made the only accurate map of the city. He married Miss Sophia Koehler, a native of Austria, Feb. 17, 1856; they have had one son, who is not living.

LOUIS JUNGKUNZ, shaving and hair-dressing saloon, Chicago street; was born in Bavaria, Germany, June 12, 1833; he came to the United States in 1853, and the following year he came to Stephenson Co. and located in Freeport, and established his present business; he has carried on the business over a quarter of a century — a longer time than any barber in Stephenson Co. In 1856, he married Miss Caroline Lucke, a native of Prussia, Germany; they have four children — Adele W., William Fred, Julia and Louie R.; Mr. Jungkunz belongs to Freeport Lodge, I. O. O. F., and to the Stephen A. Douglas Encampment.

REV. CLEMENT KALVELAGE, Pastor St. Joseph German Catholic Church; is a native of Oldenberg, Germany, and was born Nov. 23, 1845; he came to the United States in 1858, and received his education at St. Francis Seminary, Milwaukee, and in Chicago, and was ordained in Milwaukee Jan. 29, 1869; he first officiated over St. Francis' Church, Ottawa, Ill., and remained there five years, and in 1874 was appointed Pastor of St. Joseph Church, and since then has officiated.

JOHN KERCH, proprietor of the New York House, 53 Galena street; is a native of Germany, and was born March 5, 1819; he came to the United States in 1842, and came to Stephenson Co. and settled in Freeport in December, 1853; the following year he opened a hotel, and has carried on the hotel business since then, a period of twenty-six years; the New York House is the oldest hotel in Freeport. In 1845, Mr. Kerch married Miss Mary Hoof, a native of Germany; they have one daughter — Mary Kerch.

I. E. KLECKNER, County Clerk, Freeport; is a native of Stephenson Co., and was born Jan. 31, 1843; he grew up to manhood on his father's farm. Upon the breaking-out of the war in 1861, when only 18 years of age, he enlisted in Co. B, 46th I. V. I.; he participated in the battles of Fort Donelson and Shiloh, and was severely wounded at Shiloh. After his return, he entered school, and afterward engaged in teaching; he was elected County Superintendent of Schools in 1869, and held that office four years; in 1873, he was elected County Clerk, and was re-elected in 1877. Mr. Kleckner was united in marriage to Miss Emma T. Robinson, from Tazewell Co., Ill., in 1870; they have two daughters — Eva and Cora.

I. KLEIN, wagon and carriage manufacturer, Bridge street; was born in Prussia March 3, 1834; he grew up and began to learn his trade there; he came to America in 1854, finished learning his trade in New York State, and came to Chicago and worked in the extensive wagon factory of Peter Schuttler; he came to Freeport in 1856, and established his present business in 1859; has successfully carried it on for twenty-one years, and has a large trade. In 1858, he married Miss Elizabeth Miller, a native of Germany; she came to this country when only 3 years of age; they have nine children — five sons and four daughters. Mr. Klein had nothing when he began, and owes his success to his own good management.

DEXTER A. KNOWLTON, [illustration], deceased; was born in Fairfield, Herkimer Co., N. Y., March 3, 1812; during his infancy, his parents moved to the hills of Chautauqua Co., in the western part of the State; here, upon a farm in the town of Stockton, were passed his childhood and youth; his parents were poor, but devout Christians, and trained their children in habits of frugality and industry; even in his boyhood he exhibited much of the energy and thriftiness which, more fully developed in after years, paved for him the way leading to his present prominent and enviable position; as he grew older, he manifested an ardent desire to engage in trade, or enter a store for the purpose of procuring an insight into the details and workings of active business life, but his father, dreading the baneful effects of evil associations, endeavored to fix his attention on farming and agricultural pursuits; he was resolved, however, to follow the bent of his inclinations, and, not desiring to succeed at the trade of shoemaker, which his parents had desired that he should embrace, determined to prepare himself to enter into a mercantile business, by securing a more thorough and varied education; after much opposition on the part of his father, who held in detestation the loose and vicious courses of many of the careless students, he succeeded, finally, in entering the academy then flourishing at Fredonia, and there prosecuted diligently his studies, in the interim, by means of his own exertions, paying for his board and tuition, and also furnishing a man to take his place on the parental farm; shortly before arriving at his majority, he returned to his home fully decided to leave the farm, and find employment in a store or mercantile house; in 1838, he started on a peddling trip to the West, and in January, 1839, settled at Freeport, Ill., where he opened a general store, meeting with gratifying success: in 1842, he first went to New York to buy goods, and soon established his credit in that city, and also in Chicago; in 1843, began his investments and operations in real estate, those ventures resulting, ultimately, in the Knowlton Additions to the town of Freeport, from which he realized a large sum of money; during 1847-48, he bought wheat heavily, in opposition to all the merchants of the town, and succeeded finally in carrying his intentions to a victorious issue; he was importantly and pecuniarily interested in the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad, which was one of the first roads projected out of Chicago; in 1850, he was elected a Director of the company, and during the following twelve years was annually re-elected to the same position, whose duties he performed with energy and ability; he never cared for or sought political preferment, and when the nomination for Governor of the State was urged upon him by the Free-Soil party, he accepted it only because he knew that its powers were too weak to elect its candidate; in 1855, he built a house at Westfield, N. Y., purposing to withdraw from the turmoil of active business life, but he was restless in the retirement, which cramped his energies and activities; in 1861, he purchased, for $100,000, the Empire Spring at Saratoga, and afterward joined the proprietors of the famous Congress Spring, and, in conjunction with them, organized the Congress and Empire Spring Company; after living on Brooklyn Heights for a period of four years, he returned to Freeport, Ill., in 1870, in order to be near his six children; three of his sons were associated with him in the banking business in this town, and are favorably known for their business abilities and trustworthiness. He was married, Jan. 15, 1834, to Evelina Arnold, to whom he attributes a great measure of his success in life, and who died in August. 1874. He continued in the banking business until his death, which occurred March 10, 1876.

H. P. KOCHSMEIER, foreman of factory of William P. Emmert: is a native of Stephenson Co., and was born in Freeport, July 27, 1851; he grew up and attended school and learned his trade here, and worked in manufacturing agricultural implements for some years; he has held the position of foreman of the factory of W. P. Emmert since 1875. Mr. Kochsmeier was united in marriage to Miss Dora A. Jastram, in this city, May 20, 1878.

JOHN KOEHLER, proprietor livery, sale and boarding stable, corner Mechanic and Galena streets; is a native of the State of Ohio, and was born Oct. 26, 1837; his parents came to Stephenson Co. in 1839, and he grew up to manhood on a farm; in 1862, he engaged in his present business, and has carried it on for the past eighteen years; he has a nice stock of horses and has a good trade; he is a member of Freeport Lodge, I. O. O. F., and also of the Encampment and the Germania Society. He married Miss Theresa Miller, in this city, Dec. 18, 1861; she is a native of Germany; they have six children — Eda, Emma, Clara, Otto, Florence and Walter.

A. C KRAFT, of the firm of Kraft Brothers, proprietors of Kraft's Hotel, east side the river; is a native of Baden, Germany, and was born April 11, 1843; he came to the United States in 1854, and came to Freeport the same year; he grew up and attended school in this State and Iowa; he has resided here permanently since 1867; he built the Kraft House in 1870, and since then the Kraft Brothers have conducted this hotel. In October, 1867, Mr. Kraft married Miss Matilda Zimmer, a native of Hanover, Germany; they have one son — Arthur W.

EDWARD KRAFT, of the firm of Kraft Brothers, proprietors Kraft House; was born in Baden, Germany, in 1847; came to America in 1854; he grew up to manhood in this State and Iowa; he has lived here since 1863; learned the baker's trade, and in 1870 engaged in the hotel business, built the Kraft House, and have conducted it since then. In 1873, he married Miss Agnes Hess, of Darlington, Wis.

JACOB KROHN, [illustration], manufacturer of fine cigars and wholesale dealer in cigars, tobacco and smoking goods, 103 Stephenson street; is a native of Germany, and was born in Prussia, Feb. 22, 1832; he grew up and learned the trade of manufacturer of cigars and tobacco; after reaching manhood he came to the United States, in 1852; he came West to Illinois and located in Freeport in May, 1855, and established his present business in a small place on Stephenson street; thoroughly understanding his business and applying himself closely, he built up a good trade, and has successfully carried on the business over a quarter of a century. Two years after coming to Freeport, Mr. Krohn returned to New York, and on the 22d of March, 1857, was united in marriage to Miss Dora Fleischman, a native of Bavaria, Germany. Mr. Krohn has held many offices of honor and trust; in 1864 he was elected Alderman, and was re-elected to the same position in 1866; in 1873 he was elected Mayor of the city, and in 1875 he was elected Supervisor, and was a member of the Building Committee for building the court house, and gave it his personal attention; in 1877 he was again elected Mayor of the city; he was a member of the Board of Education three years, and was chosen President of the board one year. Mr. Krohn is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and has been prominently identified with the order for a quarter of a century; while living in New York he joined Ulster Lodge 193 A., F. & A. M., at Saugerties, Feb. 7, 1855; after coming to Freeport in 1856 he joined Excelsior Lodge, 97; he is also a member of Freeport Chapter, and is serving his second term as presiding officer of that body; he also belongs to the Freeport Consistory, and has held the position of Treasurer for the past three years; he has held the position of Grand Junior Warden and Grand Senior Warden of the Grand Lodge; was elected Grand High Priest, and afterward, in 1875, was elected Grand Patriarch; in 1876 was elected Grand Representative to the Grand Lodge; he is a Director in the Illinois Masonic Benevolent Society, and holds the responsible position of Chairman of Finance Committee, and to his earnest efforts more than any one else does the society owe the establishment of its permanent reserve surplus fund; there are few men better known to the order in this State than Mr. Krohn; Mr. Krohn is also prominently connected with the fraternity of I. O. O. F.; he became a member of Winnesheik Lodge, No. 30, in 1856; in the following year he withdrew to organize Freeport Lodge, No. 239, and was one of the charter members; he was a member of Western Star Encampment, No. 25; he afterward was prominent in organizing Stephen A. Douglas Encampment, No. 100, and was chosen the first presiding officer of that body. Mr. Krohn has been actively and prominently identified with the interests of Freeport and Stephenson Co. for twenty-five years, and is noted for his generosity, and is one of the most successful men in this section of the State. He has been a Director of the Second National Bank for many years. Mr. and Mrs. Krohn have eight children — one son and seven daughters; they have one of the finest and most attractive homes in the city or in this part of the State.

D. KUEHNER, wholesale and retail dealer in furniture, corner of Galena and Exchange streets; is a native of Germany, and was born Sept. 1, 1830; he grew up to manhood, and learned the furniture trade; he came to the United States in 1851; lived in Ohio five years, and came to Stephenson Co. in April, 1856, and located in Freeport. The following year, in 1857, he bought the lot on the corner of Galena and Exchange streets, and established his present business, and has carried it on for twenty-three years on the same corner; he is the oldest furniture dealer in Freeport; when he began he only had a little; but by close attention to business and good management he has established a large trade, and is one of the most successful merchants in this city. In 1869, he built the large block corner Galena and Exchange streets; he has erected several stores on Galena and Stephenson streets. In January, 1854, Mr. Kuehner married Miss Hannah Leander, a native of Germany; they have five children — Louis J., Willie, Fred, Hannah and Darius R. Mr. and Mrs. Kuehner have one of the finest
homes in the city, located on Stephenson street.

THEODORE KUNDINGER, of the firm of Kundinger & Hart, dealers in clothing and gents' furnishing goods, and merchant tailors, 123 Stephenson street; is a native of Germany, and was born April 16, 1835; he came to the United States in 1851, and came West to Illinois in 1857; lived in Peoria; he came to Freeport in 1866; in 1874, he engaged in the clothing business, and has carried on the business since then, and the firm have built up a good trade. In July, 1866, Mr. Kundinger was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Cobbs, from Jacksonville, Ill.; they have three children — Dora, Birdie and Mary.

DANIEL KUNZ, bakery and restaurant, No. 88 Stephenson street; is a native of Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, and was born Aug. 28, 1822; he came to the United States in July, 1846; he lived in New York City ten years, and was engaged in the bakery business; he came to Stephenson Co. in January, 1856, and settled in Freeport, and engaged in his present business, and has carried it on for twenty-five years. He has been twice married; his first wife was Sophia Graeser, from Baden, Germany; his present wife was Kate Stes, a native of Germany; he has three children — Lena, George, and Emma.

W. S. LAMB, of the firm of T. A. Stiles & Co., founders and machinists, manufacturers of cultivators, Bridge street; is a native of Delaware Co., Ohio, and was born Dec. 1, 1828; he grew up and attended school there; after reaching manhood he engaged in business, and was for eight years a member of the firm of Bradley, Burnham, Lamb & Co.; they were extensively engaged in the manufacture of engines, boilers and machinists' tools; he came to Freeport in 1859. and remained a short time; then returned East; in 1868, he came here and located permanently; in 1876, he associated with his present partner, Mr. Stiles, and engaged in their present business, and they have built up a large trade. In 1864, Mr. Lamb was united in marriage to Miss Anna M. Fry, daughter of Hon. C. J. Fry, of this city; they have one son — Robert Belden Lamb.

O. C. LATHROP, attorney-at-law, corner of Stephenson and Chicago streets; is a native of Washington Co., Vt., and was born May 12, 1840; his parents came West to Illinois, and located at Aurora in 1843; he grew up and attended school there, and then went East and completed his literary course at the Lamoille Grammar School, in Vermont; after his return he decided to study law; and, on the morning of the day he began reading law, news came of the attack upon Ft. Sumter; he enlisted the same day in Co. C, the first company from Aurora, in the 7th I. V. I.; three-months service. Upon his return, he pursued his law studies in Aurora and Chicago; and was admitted to the bar in 1865; he practiced law then until 1869; then went to Michigan, and was engaged in practice there six years; he came to Freeport in 1875, and since then has practiced his profession here; he has held the office of City Attorney here.

JOHN LAWLESS, of the firm of Lawless, Wohlford & Lawless, manufacturers of lime, and dealers in lime, cement, stucco and plastering hair; came to Stephenson Co. when quite small, and has grown up to manhood here; in 1877 he engaged in manufacturing lime; the present firm established their business in Freeport in February, 1880, and are building up a good trade.

MICHAEL LAWVER, residence on Lincoln avenue; is a native of the State of Pennsylvania, and was born in Mifflin Co. (now Juniata Co.), Jan. 3, 1812; he grew up to manhood there; in 1846, he came West by wagon, and was about six weeks on the way, and arrived in this county May 26, 1846; he located at Lena, entered land where the town now stands, and made a farm; he was one of the early settlers there, and was prominently identified with the laying-out, starting and building up of that town; there were few persons in the county more ready to aid settlers who came here without means; he entered land for them, loaned them money to enter their land, and waited until they could repay him, without obliging them to pay 25 per cent interest; he was actively engaged in mercantile business and railroading. He held the office of School Trustee of the town over fifteen years, and was Clerk and member of the Board of Supervisors a number of times, and other town and school offices. Mr. Lawver owes his success in life to his own efforts. He has been twice married; his first wife was Catharine Shellenbarger, a native of Pennsylvania; she died in January, 1869, leaving eight children — John (now in Missouri), Aaron (in the U. S. Mint in California), Jennie (now Mrs. H. C. Burchard), Isaiah (an attorney in St. Louis), Susan (now Mrs. George Fry, Chicago), Peter (physician, Washington), Mary (now Mrs. Charles Leggett, Grand Rapids, Mich.), Fannie (now Mrs. C. B. Fitch, of this city). In 1870, Mr. Lawver married Mary Louise Williams, a native of Connecticut; they have three children — Charles, Ida and Hiram.

J. R. LEIGH, Sheriff of Stephenson Co.; is a native of Washington Co., N. Y.,and was born April 19, 1832; he grew up to manhood in that State, and learned the trade of carpenter and joiner; he came West to Illinois in 1856, and located in Stephenson Co.; engaged in working at his trade. After the war broke out, he enlisted in the 92d I. V. I., and was Orderly Sergeant of Co. A; he served three years and participated in many severe battles and skirmishes; he was wounded in the battle of Aiken, S. C. After the war he engaged in buying grain. In 1876, he was elected Sheriff of this county, and was re-elected in 1878. In 1859, Mr. Leigh was united in marriage to Miss Harriet L. Pickard, a native of Stephenson Co.; they have four children — Clarence W., Iva C, Jessie and Jennie.

GEORGE LICHTENBERGER, of the firm of Lichtenberger Brothers, dealers in fresh and salt meats, Chicago street, between Stephenson and Galena; is a native of Germany, and was born in the Kingdom of Bavaria, Aug. 20, 1834; his parents came to America, and arrived at New Orleans Christmas morning, 1847; they came to Freeport in 1848; arrived here about the 1st of August; the following year he went to New York City, and lived there until the spring of 1853; then returned here; in 1855 he began the butchering business; in 1860 he went out to the mountains; after his return, in 1861, he established his present business; he and his brother are associated together, and have a leading trade, and their market is one of the oldest in the city. Mr. Lichtenberger has held the office of City Treasurer; he has been connected with the Fire Department since 1856, and has served as Assistant Foreman and Foreman, Assistant Chief, and was chosen Chief Engineer of the department, which position he has recently resigned. Mr. Lichtenberger married Miss Mary Colley, a native of Onondaga Co., N. Y., Nov. 16, 1859; they have four children — Edmund J., Clara, Agnes and Louise.

HENRY LICHTENBERGER, of the firm of Lichtenberger Bros., proprietors Center Market, dealers in fresh and salted meats, Chicago street; is a native of Germany, and was born Sept. 29, 1837; his parents came to the United States in 1847. and the following year came to Stephenson Co.; he engaged in his present business in 1861. He was elected City Alderman, and served in that position six years; he was elected Supervisor in 1878 and re-elected in 1879, and again re-elected in 1880, serving his third term as a member of the board. In 1862 he was united in marriage to Miss Johanna Meyer, a native of Hanover, Germany; they have six children — Fred, Albert, Ellen, Martha, Josephine and William.

C H. LITTLE, wholesale and retail dealer in crockery, 72 Stephenson street; is a native of the State of Massachusetts; he grew up to manhood in that State, and came West to Illinois and located in Freeport in 1855; in 1859 he established his present business, and has successfully carried it on over twenty years, and has a large established trade; he carries a large stock of goods, occupying two stores; his retail department is arranged with great taste, and he has one of the most attractive stores in the State or in the West. Mr. Little had nothing when he began, but by great energy and close attention to business has become one of the most successful merchants in Northern Illinois. In 1857, Mr. Little was united in marriage to Miss Sarah C. Dysslin, from Springfield, Mass.; she is a native of Herkimer Co., N. Y.

JOHN LOOS, manufacturer and dealer in harness; also, dealer in saddles, trunks, valises, etc., Galena avenue, north of Galena street; is a native of Germany, and was born Dec. 6, 1840, in County Reinich. Grand Duchy of Luxemburg: his parents came to America in 1852, and located in Ogle Co.; he came to Freeport in 1862, and learned his trade here; he engaged in business for himself in June, 1869, and has established a good trade. Mr. Loos was united in marriage at Freeport Nov. 27, 1865, to Miss Mary Suhns, born May 14, 1847, at Eblington, Grosherzogtum Boxberg Baden; they have eight children — Ferdinand, born Nov. 1, 1866; John, born Dec. 24, 1867; Damien, born May 11, 1869; Mary, born Nov. 6, 1871; Elizabeth, born May 14, 1872; Franzceskus, born Oct. 24, 1873; Anna, born Sept. 7, 1875, and William, born Dec. 13, 1877.

N. B. LOOS, manufacturer and dealer in harness, saddlery, hardware, trunks, etc., No. 145 Stephenson street; is a native of Germany, and was born Dec. 21, 1847; his parents came to the United States in 1856, and came to Illinois and settled in Ogle Co.; he learned his trade in this city; when he completed his trade he only had SI. 50; he engaged in business for himself in 1868; by industry and close attention to business he has built up a good trade. In 1869 he was united in marriage to Miss Catharine Ryan, in Rockford, Ill.; they have three children — Nellie, Frances and Gertrude.

JAMES C. McGRATH, of the firm of Seitz & McGrath, publishers of the Freeport Daily Herald; is a native of Stephenson Co. and was born in Freeport Aug. 8, 1856; he grew up and attended school here; in 1873 he entered the office of the Bulletin, where he learned the printing business; he has been connected with the Herald since it was established, in April, 1877.

WILLIAM McHENRY, photograph artist, 105 Stephenson street; is a native of Chautauqua Co., N. Y., and was born March 28, 1836; he came West to Racine, Wis., in 1856; he came to Freeport in 1863, and established his present business and has carried it on for the past seventeen years. In 1865 he married Miss Amanda Black, a native of Canton, Ohio; they have had three children — Alice, Georgie and Gracia.

D. A. McMILLAN, of the firm of McMillan & Smith, dealers in lumber, lath, shingles and timber, 32 Stephenson street; is a native of Canada; he received his education in the State of New York; he came West to Wisconsin, in 1855, and came to Stephenson Co. and located in Freeport. in 1863, and engaged in the lumber business; he is largely interested in pine lands, and has manufactured extensively for the Chicago market, his sales there amounting to as high as six million feet annually. Mr. McMillan is the oldest dealer in lumber in Freeport, and has always transacted a large business here.

JAMES McNAMARA, wholesale and retail dealer in boots and shoes, 87 Stephenson street; is a native of the State of Ohio, and was born in Fremont, Sandusky Co., Aug. 27, 1846, he grew up and attended school there; after reaching manhood, he came to Stephenson Co., and located in Freeport in 1867, and established his present business; he has built up a large and leading trade. In 1870, Mr. McNamara was united in marriage to Miss Mary Lane, a native of Delaware, Ohio; they have one daughter — Lulu.

W. P. MALBURN, dealer in wines and liquors, Stephenson street, corner Liberty; is a native of Albany, N. Y., and was born March 11, 1815; he grew up to manhood there; he came West and located in Stephenson Co., in April, 1857 and engaged in the grain business, and since then has been engaged in business here. Mr. Malburn married Miss Laura A. Kinney, a native of Onondaga Co., N. Y.; they have had three children, only one of whom survives.

REV. THOMAS F. MANGAN, Pastor of St. Mary's Catholic Church; is a native of Ireland and was born in County Clare Dec. 18, 1826; he grew up and attended school and received part of his education there, and came to Canada in 1847 and pursued a course of study at the College of Ottawa; he came to St. Louis in 1857, and was ordained in that city by Bishop Duggan Jan. 23, 1858, and since then, for the past twenty-two years, he has officiated in this State; he came to this county in 1874, and officiated as Pastor of St. Mary's Church since 1877.

PELLS MANNY, [illustration], pioneer, farmer and manufacturer, of Illinois; was born at Amsterdam, Montgomery Co., N. Y., Aug. 17, 1802; his parents were Gabriel Manny and Elizabeth (Pells) Manny; his first occupation after leaving school consisted in managing a boat on the waters of the Erie Canal, New York, and at this he continued for about seven years; in 1836, he removed from Amsterdam to the State of Illinois, and commenced farming on the prairie, in the vicinity of a place then called Yankee Settlement, the county at that early date being totally unorganized and very sparsely settled. In 1838, he received the appointment of Postmaster at Waddams Grove, in what is now Stephenson Co.; this position he retained for a period of sixteen years, and fifteen years after its relinquishment the Post Office discovered that it was indebted to him to the amount of $17, and that sum was subsequently remitted to him in a post office draft at Amsterdam. The attention of farmers was then being directed to farm machinery, for labor was difficult to procure, and expensive to retain through the season of compulsory idleness, and a vast amount of produce was annually lost or destroyed simply through the lack of help in harvesting and gathering; his attention was called to an account of a machine invented in Europe by the Gauls some 300 years ago, and adapted to harvesting purposes, and, from the description thus procured, he originally conceived the idea ultimately the motor power of such important results In 1849, his first patent for the “Manny Reaper” was obtained; he had previously been experimenting for some time, and had invented a machine for cutting off the heads of the grain, which, however, was quickly superseded by the reaper; the latter invention was not introduced without considerable difficulty, as the farmers did not primarily appear to comprehend thoroughly and with sufficient quickness the method of managing it, and about $20,000 were expended in perfecting the machines before they could be got to work successfully, but, in 1852, the reaper was at length brought to a state of comparative perfection, and began to be sought for by agriculturalists, and in the following year his son, J. N. Manny, began its manufacture also, at Rockford, Winnebago Co. In 1856, he established a factory at Freeport, and thenceforth the business grew with a marvelous rapidity, until within a brief period the annual product rose to several thousands. At the present time the manufactories of “Manny's Reapers” are established in various parts of the country and in successful operation, while the machines are extensively used in every State in the Union; since 1849, he has been connected with various parties in the reaper manufacturing business, but lately has, in a great measure, relinquished those associations on account of the enfeeblement of his health, and withdrawn from the turmoil of active business life. Among others who were connected with him in a business capacity for a shorter or longer period, was his son-in-law, Jeremiah Pattison Mr. Manny is not, as many suppose, the first inventor of reapers and mowers, but the immediate agent in their perfection. The “Walter A. Wood Machine,” at Hoosic Falls, N. Y., is an offshoot of the Manny machines; the right of manufacture was sold by him to W. A. Wood, who has since added various improvements, and prospered so greatly in his business that he has now the largest manufactory in the world.

M. MARVIN, attorney at law, Opera House block; is a native of Livingston Co., N. Y., and was born June 17, 1828; he came to Fulton Co., Ill., in 1838; he grew up and received his education in this State; he first came to Freeport in July, 1847; in 1850, he went to Jo Daviess Co. and studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1855, and engaged in the practice of law. In 1861, he was elected County Judge, and held that office eight years; he also held the office of Postmaster at Warren. In 1872, he came to Freeport, and since then has practiced his profession here. In 1849, Judge Marvin married Miss Louise Marshall, a native of Vermont; she died in 1857, leaving one son — Walter; in 1861, he married Martha J. Jones, from Wisconsin; they have seven children — Edith, Matthew, Evelyn, Percival, Fred, Herbert, and infant daughter.

GEORGE MAYNARD, merchant, dealer in dry goods, notions and carpets, No. 133 Stephenson street; is a native of Oxford, Worcester Co., Mass.; he grew up and attended school in that State, and prepared for college; he came West to Illinois and located in Freeport, in August, 1850; he established his present business in the spring of 1852, and has successfully carried on business here for twenty-eight years, a greater length of time than any merchant in Freeport; during that time, in the several financial revolutions through which he has passed, he has always paid 100 cents on the dollar; he began life with very little, but, applying himself closely to the details of his business, and by his integrity in commercial life, he has become one of the most successful merchants in this State; the mercantile house of George Maynard is the oldest in Stephenson Co.; in 1873, he went abroad, making an extensive tour through Europe, Asia, Africa, Egypt and the Holy Land; he has been actively identified with the interests of Stephenson Co. over a quarter of a century.

ESROM MAYER, cashier of bank of M. Hettinger, Collman Bros. & Co.; is a native of Lancaster Co., Penn., and was born April 21, 1837; when 10 years of age, his parents came West to Stephenson Co., and located in Freeport, in 1847; he grew up and attended school, and in 1855, entered the bank of Oscar Taylor; in 1857, he entered the bank of De Forest & Co., and in 1860, he became a partner; upon the organization of the First National Bank, he was elected Cashier, and held that position until 1870; in May, 1876, he entered the bank of M. Hettinger, Collman Bros. & Co., and since then has held his present position. In I860, Mr. Mayer was united in marriage to Miss Mary M. Hane, from Canton, Ohio; they have four children — Addie E., Anna B., Mary L. and Grace E.

U. D. MEACHAM, attorney and counselor at law, corner Stephenson and Chicago streets; is a native of the State of New York, and was born in Genesee Co., now Wyoming Co., March 12, 1816; he went to Michigan in 1828, and grew up and attended school there; then came to Walworth Co., Wis., where he studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1846; after being admitted, he practiced law there until coming to Stephenson Co., in 1852; he located in Freeport and engaged in the practice of law. He has held the office of State's Attorney for this district, and was elected Mayor of the city of Freeport; while living in Wisconsin, when quite a young man, he was elected State's Attorney, and held that office four years, and also held the office of Postmaster of Elkhorn four years. Mr. Meacham has practiced his profession in this county twenty-eight years. He married Eliza A. Thompson, a native of New York, in 1864; they have two children — Jessie and James: Mr. Meacham has one son, William P., by a former wife, now living in Walworth Co., Wis.

L. A. MEASE, physician and surgeon, Munn's Building, corner Stephenson and Van Buren streets; is a native of Union Co., Penn., and was born Sept. 26, 1820; when only nine years of age, his parents removed to Ohio; he grew up and attended school there; he afterward studied medicine; he came to Stephenson Co. in 1845, and engaged in the practice of medicine; he attended lectures and graduated at Bush Medical College, Chicago, in 1851; he also took an additional course and graduated at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 1856; Dr. Mease has practiced his profession here for a a period of thirty-five years, and is the oldest practicing physician in Stephenson Co.; Dr. Mease is a great student, and has written much for the advancement of the profession; his library contains some of the rarest and most valuable works to be found in this country. Dr. Mease has been twice married; in January, 1845, he married Sarah Jane Patton, from Clarion Co., Penn.; she died in 1850, leaving two children — Pancoast and Flora M. C. He married Angeline A. Fisher, from Union Co., Penn., Aug. 2, 1851; they have one son — D. C. L. Mease, now attending university at Madison; lost one son — VelpeaUj at the age of 19; he was reading medicine. Dr. Mease holds the position of President of the Stephenson Co. Society of Physicians and Surgeons; he was prominent in organizing the society, and was chosen its first President.

EDMUND M. MERCK, dealer in fresh and salted meats, Exchange street, north of Galena street; is a native of Alsace, France, and was born Sept. 27, 1853; he came to the United States in 1871, and came to Stephenson Co. the same year; in 1872, he established his present business, and has carried it on for eight years, and has built up a good trade. In 1876, he married Miss Josephine Schmich, from this county; they have two children — Mary L. J. and Rosa D. Mr. Merck is a member of the Fire Department, and of the German Benevolent Society.

CHARLES E. MEYER, manufacturer of vinegar, Spring street, near depot I. C. and C. & N. W. R. R.; is a native of Germany, and was born in Hanover, July 21, 1832; he emigrated to America in 1853, and came to Freeport in 1855; in 1860, he opened an eating house, and continued in that business fourteen years; in 1874, he engaged in manufacturing vinegar, and since then has continued in that business, and is building up a large trade. In 1856, he was united in marriage to Miss Fredrika Kraft, a native of Baden, Germany; they have three children — Emma, Alma and Charles; they have lost one daughter, Jennie.

L. METZGER, meat market, corner Delaware and Kickapoo streets; was born in Baden, Germany, Oct. 26, 1826; he came to America in 1852, and came to Freeport in May, 1854, and worked at his trade of stone-mason and brick-layer until 1876, when he opened a meat market. He married Miss Eva Heitzman, from Baden, Germany, Aug. 28, 1852; they have three children — Peter, Amelia and Joseph.

F. I. MIDDLEDITCH, of the firm of Middleditch & Potter, jobbers of foreign and domestic wines and liquors, No. 47 Stephenson street, corner Exchange; is a native of Erie Co., N. Y., and was born in the city of Buffalo; he grew up to manhood in that State; he came to Stephenson Co., and located in Freeport in 1865, and established his present business, and the firm of Middleditch & Potter have successfully carried on the business for the past fifteen years, and have built up a large trade. Mr. Middleditch was elected a member of the Board of Supervisors, and held that office two years, and has held the office of Chief Engineer of the Fire Department. He was united in marriage to Miss Mary Ryan, in Buffalo, N. Y., Dec. 25, 1854; they have two children — Marie and Frances.

J. H. MILLER, livery, sale and boarding stable, corner Bridge and Chicago streets; is a native of Berks Co., Penn., and was. born Oct. 14, 1825; he grew up and lived there until 1847, when he came West, and located in Stephenson Co., at Buena Vista, and engaged in milling; in 1856, he engaged in livery and stock business; he has carried on the livery business for twenty-four years; he has held the office of City Alderman four years. In 1845, he married Elizabeth Shilling, from Berks Co., Penn.; she died in November, 1863, leaving two sons — Milton E. and De Witt C. In October, 1865, he married Helen Webster, a native of Hull, England, daughter of Thomas Webster, of this city.

GEORGE MILNER, of the firm of Milner Bros.; proprietor of the Albion Brewery, Chicago street; is a native of England, and was born June 12, 1828; after reaching manhood he came to the United States in 1848; he came West to Illinois the same year, and came to Freeport and established his present business with his brother in 1865, and they have carried on the business since. Mr. Milner married Miss Mary E. Lander, a native of England; they have three children — John T., Evelina and Fred A.

JOSEPH MILNER, of the firm of Milner Bros.; proprietor of the Albion Brewery, Chicago street; is a native of England, and was born July 24, 1831; he came to the United States in 1849, and came to Freeport in 1855 and engaged in the grocery trade; in 1865 they established their present business, and have carried it on since then. In 1854 Mr. Milner married Miss Ellen Carter, a native of England; they have four children — Anna, John G., William and Joseph. Mr. Milner has held the office of Commissioner of Highways.

JAMES MITCHELL, deceased, banker and real estate operator; was born in Cumberland Co., Penn., in 1810; his parents were James A. Mitchell, a Major in the war of 1812, and Mary (Scroggs) Mitchell; his earlier education was acquired in the neighboring common schools of his native place; thence he removed, in 1827, to the vicinity of the Galena Lead Mines. He was an active and a prominent participant in the Black Hawk Indian war of 1832 and 1833, and throughout the conflict performed valiant and efficient service; in 1838, he returned to Rockford, and was appointed Clerk of the Circuit Court of Winnebago Co.; in 1842, he was appointed Canal Commissioner by Gov. Ford, and served in this capacity during the ensuing two years; in 1846, he was given the appointment of Agent for mineral lands, lead mines, for collecting dues, selling lands, etc. This position he held until its abolishment, in 1848, conducting himself in the interim with rectitude and ability; he subsequently removed to Freeport, and there became engaged in the real estate business, in which he continued until 1852; in the course of the same year he established the Stephenson County Bank, and was actively and constantly engaged in connection with that institution, until his demise in August, 1874. In all that concerned the status and welfare, social and political, of his adopted State and county, he ever evinced a warm and generous interest, and was a valued and energetic co-worker in all movements and enterprises having for their end the increased well-being of the general community, amid which he was an honored and beloved citizen. He was married, in 1838, to Mary Thornton, of Kentucky; again, in 1843, to Mrs. James W. Stephenson, of Galena, Ill., and again, subsequently, in 1848, to Miss Catharine Clark, of Michigan, who survives him. The last-named lady is the daughter of Robert Clark, formerly for several years member of Congress for the Territory of Michigan, and sister of Gen. John A. Clark, Surveyor General of Utah and New Mexico, under the administration of Abraham Lincoln. Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell had seven children, four of whom survive — Mary, now Mrs. J. W. Neff; Miss Kittie, Ellen K., now Mrs. C. E. Scott; and John C.

JACOB MOLTER, of the firm of Friedag & Molter, manufacturers and dealers in harness, saddles and trunks, 59 Stephenson street; is a native of Germany and was born Aug. 3, 1835; came to the United States in 1850 and came to Freeport the same year; he learned his trade here; in 1866 he engaged in business for himself, and in 1869 he associated with his present partner, and they have built up a good trade. He married Miss Catharine Knicht, a native of Germany, March 26, 1860 they have seven children — Willie, August, Julia, Philip, Emile, Carl and Fritz. Mr. Molter is a member of the fraternity of I. O. O. F. and the Encampment; also belongs to the Germania Society and the Sons of Hermann, and to the Fire Department.

MORGAN BROTHERS, novelty iron works, iron and brass founders and manufacturers of swords, patent wind-mills and iron pumps, corner Chicago and Jackson streets; was established here in 1867; the firm consists of E. H. and Charles Morgan; they are natives of Duchess Co., N. Y., and came with their parents to Stephenson Co. in 1853; they established their present business in 1867, and have carried it on since then; they have a large practical experience in their line of business, and have built up a large trade.

LEVI L. MUNN, [illustration], capitalist, was born in Madrid, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., Sept. 1, 1829; his parents were Abel Munn and Susannah (Barnuin) Munn; he was the recipient of a common-school education; in 1846, he removed to Freeport, Ill., in order to join his elder brother, and there was occupied in working on his farm in summer and attending school during the winter months; in 1848, he attended also, for one year, the sessions of a neighboring select school; in 1849-50, he taught school in the northern part of Stephenson Co., and in the course of the latter year established himself in business in Freeport, as an insurance agent, representing several New York insurance companies, for the States of Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin and Indiana. In 1853, he organized the first insurance company formed in Freeport, the “Stephenson Insurance Company,” of which he became Secretary, continuing to act in that capacity until 1865, when he resigned on account of continued ill health; in 1866, he established a dry goods business in partnership with his brother, under the style of O. V. & L. L. Munn; this business, subsequently entirely his own, through the purchase of his brother's interest, he ultimately disposed of in 1869; in 1871, he bought a half-interest in the Freeport gas works, “The Freeport Gas-light and Coke Company,” which business he still carries on in partnership with L. Z. Farwell; prior to this, in 1855, he had become interested in real-estate operations, and built the block known as Munn's Building; in the same year, also, the American Insurance Company was formed in Freeport, and he was closely connected with its organization; was appointed to its Presidency in 1867, and officiated in that capacity until 1870, when the company removed to Chicago, and he became one of its Directors. That company does the most extensive business in farm property insurance exclusively, of any similar establishment in the country. When Mr. Munn came to Freeport he only had $1.25 in money, and his success in life is owing to his own industry and energy; he is a leading and influential member of the Masonic body, and was presiding officer of the Grand Chapter of the State of Illinois for 1866; in various other societies, also, he occupies high positions. In 1861, he was married to Mary L. Ladd, of Haverhill, N. H.; they have four children — Ella E., George L., Loyal L., Jr., and Florence Louise.

JAMES I. NEFF, attorney and counselor at law, Stephenson street; is a native of Central Pennsylvania, and was born Oct. 5, 1840; he grew up to manhood in that State, and was educated at Dickinson College; he came to Tiffin, Ohio, in 1861. After the breaking out of the rebellion, enlisted as private in Co. H, 101st Ohio V. I. He was promoted to 2d Lieutenant and then to 1st Lieutenant, and served as Adjutant of the regiment one year; he was promoted and commissioned Captain of Co. H, and served as Judge Advocate on the staff of Gen. Stanley; he served in the Army of the Cumberland from 1862 until the close of the war; was mustered out at Cleveland in July, 1865. He resumed his law studies, and was admitted to the bar at Columbus in January, 1867; soon after being admitted, in June of the same year, he came to Illinois and located at Freeport; he formed a co-partnership with Hon. Thomas J. Turner, which continued until June, 1869; he then associated with Hon. J. M. Bailey, present Judge of the Appellate Court, and this partnership continued until the latter was elected to the bench, in 1878; since then the firm has been Neff & Stearns; in 1878, Mr. Neff was elected to the State Legislature, and was an active, efficient member of the last General Assembly.

FRANK NORTHROP, superintendent of painting and finishing in the carriage manufactory of J. W. Henney & Co., Bridge and Adams streets; is a native of Genesee Co., N. Y., and was born Oct. 29, 1847; he grew up and learned his trade there: after reaching manhood, he came West to Coldwater, Mich., in 1871, where he remained until 1877; the following year he came to Stephenson Co., and became connected with the extensive carriage and buggy factory of J. W. Henney & Co., and since then has occupied his present position; he has had a large practical experience in carriage painting, and has few superiors in this department of the business. In June, 1868, Mr. Northrop was united in marriage to Miss Libbie Grattan, a native of Exeter, England.

EDWIN PERKINS, brick manufacturer, Adams street; is a native of England, and was born Oct. 2, 1837; he came to the United States in 1849, and came West to Stephenson Co. the same year; he grew up to manhood here, and established his present business in 1866, and has carried it on for the past fourteen years. In 1860, Mr. Perkins was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Round, a native of England; they have ten children, five sons and five daughters — William A., Jennie, Frank, Nellie, Harry, Edeline, May, Robert Burton, Celina and Bennie.

ELIAS PERKINS, contractor and builder; is a native of Derbyshire, England, and was born in May, 1830; he grew up, and served apprenticeship to the brick-mason's trade; he came to the United States in 1849, and came to Stephenson Co. and arrived in Freeport April 27 of the same year, and began working at his trade; he has been engaged in building and contracting over thirty years, and is the oldest in the business and has built many of the best buildings here; his brother William came here in 1844, and erected the first brick building in Freeport. Mr. Perkins has held the office of City Alderman, and also Assistant Supervisor. In 1849, Mr. Perkins was united in marriage to Miss Mary Wood, a native of England; they have had five children, only one of whom survives — Charles Edwin, born July 13, 1859, and now engaged in business here.

J. R. PERKINS, steam and gas fitter and plumber, Bridge street; is a native of New York State, and was born in the town of Franklin, Delaware Co., July 2, 1835. He grew up to manhood in that State, and when the war broke out he enlisted in the 21st N. Y. V. I.; was transferred to the 1st N. Y. Mounted Rifles; he remained in the service until June, 1865. He came to Stephenson Co. the same year, and located in Freeport; entered the hardware house of Burchard Bros., where he remained four years, and, in 1869, established his present business, and has built up a good trade; he makes a specialty of heating houses by steam. He is a member of Excelsior Lodge, 97, A. F. & A. M., and of Freeport Chapter, No. 23, and Freeport Commandery, No. 7; also is a member of J. H. Addams Lodge, A. O. U. W. Mr. Perkins was united in marriage to Miss C. L. Butler, of Otsego Co., N. Y., Oct. 20, 1859; they have one daughter — Lillie A.

J. J. PIERSOL, residence Galena avenue; is a native of Hunterdon Co., N. J., and was born Aug. 8, 1819; he grew up to manhood in Pennsylvania, and learned the trade of blacksmith; he came to Illinois and located in Stephenson Co., in May, 1851, and began working at his trade. When the war broke out, he enlisted as private, in 1862, in the 93d I. V. I.; he was elected 2d Lieutenant of Co. G; he was promoted to Captain of Co. G, and commanded the company in the battles of Champion Hills, Jackson, Port Gibson and Raymond; was wounded at Champion Hills; he had two sons in the army; he was honorably discharged from the service Jan. 4, 1864, on account of wounds received; he still carries rebel bullets in his body. After his return, he was elected Sheriff of the county, served two years, then was appointed Deputy Sheriff, and served six years, when he was again elected Sheriff, and held that office four years; he has also held school offices. Capt. Piersol was united in marriage, Oct. 17, 1841, to Miss Elizabeth A. Lattig, a native of Pennsylvania; they have seven children — George L., enlisted and served in the 11th and the 93d I. V. I.; Evans P., enlisted and served in the 72d I. V. I.; Augustus R., Lavinia, Emma, Frank R. and Cora E.

DR. NATHAN FAY PRENTICE (deceased), physician; was born in Cayuga Co., N. Y., Oct. 11, 1825; he received his early education at Owa?ka and Moravia, in that State; in 1846, he attended the Medical Academy at Castleton, Vt., and also attended medical lectures in New York; in 1847, he commenced the practice of medicine in Rochester; in 1848, he came West, and located in Rockton, Winnebago Co. Dr. Prentice was united in marriage Nov. 20, 1851. to Miss Miranda Hyatt, a native of Canada; the following year they came to Freeport, and engaged in the practice of his profession. Dr. Prentice was prominently identified with the Masonic fraternity, and was a member of the 33d Degree; he was Commander of Freeport Commandery, No. 7, for five years, and held the office of Prelate in said Commandery for four years; he was Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery of the State of Illinois in 1866. Dr. Prentice successfully practiced his profession here until his death, which occurred April 19, 1873; he left two children — daughter Lizzie (now Mrs. F. A Read, Jr., of this city), and a son, Charles Sumner Read, living with his mother.

GEORGE PURINTON, [illustration], lawyer and Judge, son of Robert and Betsy Hall Purinton, was born in Cumberland Co. Me., Nov. 30, 1809; he was raised on the homestead farm till 16 years old, during which period he attended the winter school from six weeks to two months yearly; at the age of 16, he was sent by his father to a private academy for six weeks, after which he worked his way along, supporting himself by teaching school, till he entered Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me., in 1831, and graduated in 1835; in 1836, he entered as law student in the office of John Neal, lawyer, novelist and poet, in the city of Portland; in the fall of 1837, he emigrated to Baltimore. Md., where he was engaged as Professor in Baltimore College for a few months. Listening to the glowing accounts of the Western prairies, the emigration fever seized him; Congress was in session, Col. Robinson was then United States Senator for the State of Illinois; the Colonel furnished him with letters of introduction to Judge Wilson and others; Judge Wilson was Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Illinois, and with him he continued his law studies in 1838; that year he was admitted to practice law in all the courts of the State, and he opened a law office at Freeport, in 1840; he was elected Secretary of the Council of Revision, composed of the Governor and Judges of the Supreme Court, for the approval of the laws of the session of 1842 and 1843; in 1848, he was elected, for four years, Judge of the County Court of Stephenson Co., having probate jurisdiction, and was Presiding Judge of the County Commissioners' Court; after the expiration of his term of office, he retired to private life, yet has often been elected to the office of Justice of the Peace, which office he now holds.

F. A. READ, Jr., of the firm of Seeley & Read, dealers in dry goods and notions, Opera House Block, Stephenson street; is a son of Rev. F. A. Read, and is a native of Winnebago Co., Ill., and was born in the city of Rockford, Aug. 27, 1852; he grew up and attended school there until 14 years of age, and came to Freeport with his parents in 1866; after attending school here he entered the store of William Walton, where he received his business education, and remained there six years; in 1877, he associated with his present partner, and engaged in the dry goods trade. Mr. Read was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth F. Prentice, daughter of the late Dr. N. F. Prentice, an old and honored citizen of Freeport, April 22, 1879; they have one daughter — Helen.

JOSEPH H. REINEKE, manufacturer and dealer in harness, saddles, trunks and valises, Galena street, third door west of Chicago street; is a native of Germany, and was born in July 15, 1845; his mother, with four children, came to Stephenson Co. in 1854; he grew up and learned his trade here; in 1867, he engaged in business, the firm being Moulter, Reineke & Co., afterward J. A. Reineke & Co.; in 1870, the firm became Reineke & Otto; they continued together for ten years, and Mr. Reineke succeeded to the business of the firm; he occupies a large store, 20x90 feet, one of the most attractive places of business in the city; he has a good stock, and by close attention to business and fair dealing has built up a large trade. During the war he enlisted in the 46th I. V. I., Co. C, and served until the end of the war. Mr. Reineke was united in marriage to Miss Augusta Shueneman, a native of Germany, Nov. 25, 1875; they have two children — Leonora and Sylvester A.; they have lost one son — Sylvester Henry. Mr. Reineke's mother is still living here in the city.

BENJAMIN RHODES, dealer in fresh and salted meats, No. 149 Stephenson street; is a native of York Co., England, and was born May 25, 1821; he grew up and learned the trade of soap and candle maker; he came to the United States in 1843, and came to Stephenson Co. in November, 1850; he engaged in the butchering business in 1852, and continued two years, and then engaged in the manufacture of soap and candles until 1861, when he again engaged in butchering, and has carried on the business since then. In 1849, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Ann Gill, from New York; they have four children — Emma L.. now Mrs. Johnson, living in Buffalo, N. Y.; Isabel H., Olive C. and Walter H. Mr. Rhodes has held the office of Town Clerk and City Collector.

A. V. RICHARDS, born May 1, 1841, in Morgan Co., Ill., near Jacksonville; his mother, Eleanor Swinnerton, was born in the same county and State, in 1818; his father, Truman P. Richards, was a native of Broome Co., N. Y., and was born in 1816; his parents lived in Illinois until 1847, when they removed to Hazel Green, Grant Co., Wis., drawn thither by lead-mine excitement, and lived there till the breaking-out of the rebellion; his father was a mechanic. A. V. attended the public schools until 15 years old, then entered a “collegiate academy,” and obtained fair education in common English branches; paid his own tuition, while attending this institution, by performing various duties and offices about the building, by teaching summer schools in the country, and working for farmers in harvest time, during vacations. In May, 1861, left home to enlist at Boscobel, that being the nearest point in the county where a military company was being organized, and to get there, walked from Platteville to Boscobel, a distance of forty miles, in one day; did not succeed in getting into the three-months service, but was sworn into the U. S. service Sept. 10, 1861, in Co. H, 7th W. V. I., one of the regiments which composed, in later days, the famous Iron Brigade of the Army of the Potomac; in the latter part of December, 1861, while the regiment was encamped at Arlington Heights, was detailed, by peremptory order of the War Department, to report to Col. A. J. Meyer, at Signal Camp of Instruction, Georgetown, D. C.; Col. Meyer was the inventor of the signal code, and Congress had authorized a detail of men and officers in order to test the value of the signal service, which was a new departure in the American army; the Signal Corps soon became very popular with army commanders, and further details were made and the corps extended to every department of the army and to the gunboats, the new signal code proving far more useful than the old arbitrary naval code; the duties of signal-men and officers, while very rigorous — as they were on duty night and day, always in small detachments and generally in exposed positions (often outside the picket lines), affording, with their party-colored signal flags, excellent targets for rebel sharp-shooters and batteries — were also very interesting and enticing, as their duties involved more of a knowledge of the operations of both armies than was enjoyed by any other branch of the service; but signal-men served for the first years of the war “without hope of fee or reward” beyond their monthly stipend, promotions being out of the question, as the corps was only nominally a branch of the service until Congress, by a law approved March 3, 1863, made it an arm of the service on the same basis as the regular army, the men and non-commissioned officers to rank as engineers, and the officers as members of the General Staff, all to be mounted; soon after this law went into effect, Mr. R. was promoted to Quartermaster Sergeant, and served in that capacity until March, 1864, when he was ordered before an examining board of regular army officers, convened by order of the War Department, to be examined for a commission; a large number of civilians and officers of volunteer organizations were permitted to compete in these examinations for appointment to the few positions to be filled; but three enlisted men of the Signal Corps were recommended for commissions by this board, together with some nineteen civilians, most of whom were well re-enforced by Congressional or other political influence; Mr. R. was one of the fortunate three who passed the ordeal with an average standing high enough to entitle him to promotion, though destitute of the “political influence,” and on the day succeeding his examination was relieved from duty as Quartermaster Sergeant and assigned to duty as an acting officer; he served in this capacity, performing the duties of signal officer in the field, for more than a year; the civilian appointees, being ignorant of the first duties of a soldier, spending most of the same year in camps of instruction, learning to be soldiers and becoming proficient in the intricacies of the signal code; in the spring of 1865, the tardy commission finally came, with rank as 2d Lieutenant, to date from Feb. 14, 1865; he accompanied McClellan to Fortress Monroe and thence up the Peninsula in 1862, participating in all the hardships of that terrible campaign, from the evacuation of Yorktown to the final evacuation of the Peninsula, and taking a part in the battle of Williamsburg and also in the bloody seven-days fighting before Richmond, at Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill, Bottoms Bridge, Savage Station, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill and Harrison's Landing, and, later, was in the battles of South Mountain and Antietam and numerous cavalry skirmishes and forays in the Boonesboro Valley about the time of the battle of Gettysburg. After the grand review at Washington, in May, 1865, the war with the South being ended, was ordered to Ft. Leavenworth, Kan., and thence to Ft. Laramie as signal officer on the staff of Gen. P. E. Connor; accompanied Gen. Connor on his Powder River expedition against the Sioux, Cheyenne and Arapahoe Indians; had several engagements with the hostiles, the most important of which was the battle of Tongue River, Aug. 30, 1865, in which Gen. Connor, with about 100 troops, attacked and destroyed an Arrapahoe village of 100 lodges, killing forty warriors and capturing some 700 head of horses and mules, many of which had been run off from the military posts; in this engagement he was struck in the jugular vein by a spent ball, but not wounded; mustered out of the U. S. service at Ft. Leavenworth, Dec. 9, 1865; after the war was over, was offered, by member of Congress, a brevet commission, but declined the honor; settled in Galena, Ill., where his parents had removed during the war. In February, 1867, married to Miss Flora L. Miner, of Galena; resided in Galena and engaged in insurance and real-estate business continuously (with exception of about one year that he lived at Warren, from 1871 to 1872,) until 1873; in 1873-74 was employed by the Department of the Interior to survey and establish the southern and western boundaries of Wyoming Territory, a work of no small magnitude and requiring no small amount of energy and intrepidity, as the lines ran through the roughest mountains and across trackless deserts, inhabited only by wild animals and wilder Indians. Concerning this work and the manner in which it was executed, the Commissioner of the General Land Office says as follows: Under the appropriation made by act of Congress, approved March 8, 1873, a contract was made with Alonzo V. Richards, astronomer and surveyor, for the survey of this boundary co-incident with the thirty-fourth degree of longitude west from Washington Observatory, and included between the forty-first and forty-fifth parallels of north latitude. The returns of the survey were made to this office during the last fiscal year, resting on fourteen different astronomical observations on Polaris and twenty-four for latitude at the terminal point of boundary. The field work was executed by Astronomer Richards, in the months of June, July, August and September, 1874, under his contract bearing date May 29, 1873, involving great labor, through a country devoid of settlements, and presenting formidable topographical features. The following letter speaks for itself: Department of the Interior, General Land Office, A. V. Richards, Esq., Galena, III. Washington, D. C, Aug. 2, 1875. Sir: I acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 27th ult., requesting to be furnished with a testimonial as to the character of the work which you returned to this office under your appointment by the Hon. Secretary of the Interior, as U. S. Astronomer and Surveyor of the southern and western boundaries of Wyoming Territory, and in pursuance of your contracts with this office. In accordance with your desire, I have caused an examination to be instituted into the records of this office, and, finding that your observations for the determination of the astronomical boundaries have been correctly made, and boundary monuments planted in conformity with the deduced results of said observations and your instructions from my predecessor in office, who fully approved your work, I cheerfully bear witness to the excellence of the character and quality of the returns, consisting of the field notes, astronomical data and series of plats illustrating the topography along the southern and western boundaries of the Territory of Wyoming, involving 645 lineal miles of survey. Considering the distance of the lines determined, marked and sketched through the trackless country, and the many obstacles impeding the progress in your work, as is evidenced by the field notes of the survey, I cannot withhold the expression of my opinion as to your said work, and have to say that it is not surpassed by any survey of the kind on file in this office, and that it reflects creditably upon this office and yourself. I am, very respectfully, etc., S. S. Burdett, Commissioner. In September, 1875, Mr. R. removed to Freeport and purchased a controlling interest in the Freeport Journal, of which he became, and still is, the editor.

J. L. ROBINSON, manufacturer of carriages, buggies and wagons, Bridge street, between Chicago and Van Bureu streets; is a native of Pennsylvania, and was born in the city of Pittsburg, Aug. 9, 1848; he came to Illinois in infancy; he grew up and learned his trade in this State; he came to Stephenson Co. in 1873, and was engaged in business in Ridott until 1876, when he established his business in Freeport, and is building up a large trade. In 1875, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah A. Briggs from Alton, HI.

HENRY ROHKAR, bakery and restaurant, 57 Stephenson street; is a native of Germany, and was born in the Kingdom of Hanover, June 11, 1829; he came to the United States in 1850, and came to Stephenson Co. and settled in Freeport, in 1856, and established his present business on the corner of Mechanic and Stephenson streets; he has occupied his present location for sixteen years, and has carried on the business here in the same block for twenty-four years. In October, 1862, he married Caroline Yerks, from Pennsylvania; they have seven children — Henry, Georgiana, Freddie, Caroline, Katie, Eugiene and an infant girl. He has one daughter, Anna, by former wife.

C. H. ROSENSTIEL, [illustration], farmer and fine stock raiser, Sec. 5; P. O. Freeport; is a native of Germany, and was born in Saxony, April 18, 1821; he grew up and received his education there; then pursued a course of study in building and architecture and received his diplomas; he came to the United States and landed in Baltimore, Aug. 17, 1840; he came to Stephenson Co. and arrived here July 15, 1842; he settled at Waddams Grove, near Eleroy, bought land there and engaged in building two years after coming here. On the 5th of October, 1844, he was united in marriage to Miss Anna C. Gilman, daughter of Daniel Gilman, one of the early settlers; her grandfather was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. In 1842, Mr. Rosenstiel, at Eleroy, manufactured the first brick ever made in this county, and they were used in building here; in 1845, he came to Freeport; in 1848, he built the first steam-mill ever erected in this county; in 1865-66 he built the woolen-mill, and in 1871-72, he built the large sugar factory for manufacturing beet sugar, and established that important enterprise, which is spoken of in another part of this volume. Mr. Rosenstiel has been interested and actively identified with various interests and industries connected with the city. Mr. Rosenstiel was the first to introduce blooded stock in this county; he owns 600 acres of land, finely located, adjoining the city; there are few grain and stock farms in Northern Illinois as finely improved and under as high a state of cultivation; there are few men who more thoroughly understand the character of the soil, its nature and demands, and who are thereby enabled to increase its producing power to the fullest extent. Mr. Rosenstiel was a member of the State Agricultural Board nineteen years, and was prominent in organizing the Agricultural Society of the county; he has been elected and served as a member of the Board of Supervisors, and other offices; he was prominent in securing the erection, in this county, of one of the finest court houses in the State, though he was opposed to and prevented the county building it upon credit by the issuing of bonds; he thought it much better to pay as they built; he was active in aiding and securing the various railroads that have reached Freeport; has been prominent in all educational matters, and has always given liberally to all church enterprises, not only in the city but throughout the county. When he began life, he had nothing; by his industry, energy, integrity and liberality, he has become one of the most successful men in the county, or in this section of the State. Mr. and Mrs. Rosenstiel have five children, three of whom are married — Matilda, now Mrs. H. B. Carey, of Beloit; Oliver E., engaged in business, Freeport; Louise, now Mrs. H. S. Stevenson, of Freeport; Jerome I. Case and Howard, both at home.

GEORGE RUSTON, buying and shipping butter and eggs, tallow and lard, No. 155 Stephenson street; is a native of England, and was born in the city of London Dec. 18, 1840; his parents came to the United States in 1842; he grew up in New York; after reaching manhood, he came to Illinois, and located in Freeport, in 1862, and established his present business; before the close of the day he arrived in Freeport, he rented a store and bought over 600 dozen eggs; Mr. Ruston has successfully carried on the business for the past eighteen years, and has a large established trade; by his energy and fair dealing, he has built up the business from $5,000 to $100,000 per annum, and for a long time has transacted the leading business in his line.

LUTHER B. SANBORN, master mechanic of the division of the Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad; is a native of Bristol, N. H., and was born March 16, 1829; he grew up and attended school there, then learned the trade of machinist and locomotive builder in Lawrence, Mass., and in Boston; he came West to Milwaukee, in 1854, and engaged in railroading, and is now one of the oldest employes of this corporation; he was foreman of the railroad shops at Watertown and at Horicon; he was appointed master mechanic of this division of the line in 1871, and since then has held that position. In August, 1856, Mr. Sanborn was united in marriage to Miss Sarah E. Norris, a native of Kennebec Co., Me.; they have three children — J. Norris (attending college), Alice J. (attending college) and Anna Maud.

D. B. SCHULTE, manufacturer of and dealer in fine harness, saddles, etc., 88 Stephenson street, also a member of the firm of Hettinger, Collmann Brothers & Co., bankers, Freeport; is a native of Westphalen, Prussia, and was born Dec. 11, 1822; he grew up to manhood and learned his trade there; he emigrated to America in 1850, and came to Detroit, Mich.; he came to Stephenson Co. and settled in Freeport April 5, 1854, and engaged in manufacturing and selling harness, and has successfully carried on the business over twenty-six years — a longer time than any one in this line of business in Freeport or in Stephenson Co.; Mr. Schulte is a member of the banking firm of Hettinger, Collman Brothers & Co. He has held the offices of City Treasurer and Assistant Supervisor; he holds the office of School Treasurer, and is a Director in the German Insurance Company. Mr. Schulte married Miss Mary Hienz, a native of the Rhine Province, Prussia, May 31, 1853; they have five children — Herman, Emma, Otto, Mathilde and Albert. When Mr. Schulte came to this country, he had very little, and he owes his success to his own efforts. He belongs to Freeport Lodge, No. 239, I. O. O. F., and to the Germania Society.

JOHN SCHMICH, of the firm of Schmich & Voigt, dealers in groceries and provisions, Galena avenue, between Galena and Stephenson streets; is a native of Erie Co., N. Y., and was born in February, 1843; his parents came to Stephenson Co. and located in Freeport in 1851; he grew up and attended school here; he associated with Mr. Voigt and established their present business in July, 1876; they are building up a good trade. Mr. Schmich was united in marriage, May 4, 1869, to Miss Mary Theresa Deguinther, a native of Germany; they have five children — Josephina T., John F., Mary M., Edmond Hugo and Oscar L.; they have lost one daughter — Rosa A.

E. SEITZ, of the firm of Seitz & McGrath, publishers of the Freeport Daily Herald; is a native of Illinois, and was born in Dupage Co. May 21, 1855; his parents came here the following year; he grew up and attended school here, and learned the printing business in the office of the Anzeiger; he has been connected with the Herald since it was established, in April, 1877.

CHARLES SEYFARTH, of the firm of Baier & Seyfarth, corner of Adams and Jackson streets, proprietors of the Freeport Brewery; is a native of Germany, and was born in Saxony, July 24, 1829; he grew up and learned the blacksmith's trade; he came to the United States in 1849, and came to Stephenson Co. in 1852; settled in Freeport and engaged in blacksmithing; he carried on that business until 1869; then Mr. Baier engaged in the brewing business; they have built up a large business. In December, 1856, Mr. Seyfarth married Miss Elizabeth Hermann, from Silver Creek, in this county; they have three children — Mary, Louis and Charles. Mr. Seyfarth has held the office of School Director, and is a member of Freeport Lodge, I. O. O. F.

J. A. SHEETZ, [illustration], insurance agent, Stephenson street; is a native of Lycoming Co., Penn., and was born Jan. 6, 1836; his parents came to Stephenson Co. in 1839, and were among the earliest settlers; he grew up and attended school here. After the war broke out, he enlisted in the 8th I. V. I., and was commissioned 2d Lieutenant of Co. F; he was promoted for gallantry at the battles of Fort Donelson and Shiloh; he was brevetted Brigadier General for gallantry at Mobile; after the close of the war, he entered the regular army, and served in the 30th and in the 4th U. S. I. until December, 1875. Col. Sheetz was united in marriage, July 3, 1879, to Miss Jennie Massenberg, of this city. One of the Freeport newspapers, speaking of the sudden death of his father, Jared Sheetz, says: “On last Sabbath, the 11th inst., just as the bells had broken the stillness of the morning, calling the people to worship in the various churches, our city was thrilled by the announcement that an old and esteemed citizen — Jared Sheetz — had been suddenly called to cross the dark valley, and had gone from the very act of devotion in the earthly sanctuary, to join the general assembly and church of the first-born in heaven. His demise, startling and unexpected as it was to us all, was a terrible blow to his loving family and friends, who had not dreamed that the somber angel of death was brooding over their peaceful home on that beautiful Sabbath morning. Only a few minutes before he had set out from his residence, on Clay street, in his usual health, to attend morning service, and, on going, remarked to his family that he thought he would go to the Lutheran, known as the Stone Church, and which is located on the South Side, a distance of about three-quarters of a mile from his home, a longer walk than he was accustomed to take. He had but just been seated in the church, and had taken up his hymn-book to join in the worship already commenced, when he was observed to swoon in his seat, his head dropped to his bosom, his book fell from his hand, he sank down and was found quite insensible. He was immediately carried out and every effort made to restore him to consciousness, but in vain. Dr. D. T. Buckley, his family physician, was immediately summoned, but before he reached the scene, life was extinct. He died of apoplexy. Mr. Sheetz was born in Berks Co., Penn., on the 6th day of January, A. D. 1805, and hence, at the time of his death, was in his 73d year. He was educated for the pulpit, and at an early age entered the ministry of the Lutheran Church, and labored successfully and with great acceptance in that office in his native State, until the year 1839, when he removed to this county. He spoke fluently both the English and German languages, and on this account found additional demand for labor in his calling, “and often went long distances to attend funerals among people who could only repay him with grateful thanks. Coming here with the very earliest settlers, and by his talent and acquirements, it was but natural that he at once took a prominent and influential rank among the leading citizens of the county, and which, by strict integrity and kind helpfulness to others less favored, he maintained through life. His influence was uniformly on the side of the best moral and material interests of the community in which he lived. Though he never sought office for himself, yet he was called upon to fill various important public trusts. He held the office of School Commissioner for Stephenson Co. at a time when our public-school system was quite new, and by his efficient administration aided greatly to organize and establish the public-school system which has since become the pride of all our people. Mr. Sheetz was twice married, and leaves a widow surviving. He reared a large family of children, and so kind and generous was he in his care for them in all their best interests, that they may well feel they have lost one who was to them a father in the true sense of that relation.”

JAMES M. SMITH, of the firm of McMillan & Smith, dealers in lumber, shingles, sash, doors and blinds, 32 Stephenson street; is a native of Union Co., Penn., and was born Dec. 4, 1819; he grew up to manhood there, and came West to Illinois in 1844 and settled in Stephenson Co.; he entered land from Government and began making a farm. A few years after coming here, in the fall of 1850, he married Miss Mary A. Miller, a native of Pennsylvania; in the fall of the same year he engaged in mercantile business at Buena Vista; he continued in trade there fifteen years; in 1872 he returned to Freeport, and in February, 1879, he associated with Mr. McMillan and engaged in the lumber business, and they have an extensive trade. Mr. Smith was the first Secretary of the Buckeye Mutual Fire Insurance Company; he has held the office of Supervisor, Collector and Commissioner of Highways, and was Postmaster at Buena Vista for many years. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have three children — Charles A., Mary and Jennie.

SYDNEY SMITH, of the firm of Smith & Porter, grain and stock dealers; is a native of the State of New York, and was born in the city of Buffalo Feb. 21, 1837; he grew up and attended school there; he came West and located in Stephenson Co. in 1855, and entered the grain warehouse as clerk, and Mr. Smith has been connected with the grain trade since then, a period of a quarter of a century; the firm of Smith & Porter are the oldest dealers in grain on this line of the road; they buy and ship from Ridott, Pecatonica, Winnebago and Baileyville; they have an extensive shipping trade. In 1860 Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Sarah M. Davis, of Brooklyn, N. Y.; she died in 1871, leaving three children — John S., Fannie and Lulu; his present wife was Theoda Knapp, from Cayuga Co., N. Y.; they have two children — Georgie and Theoda.

MRS. CHRISTINE SNOW, formerly Miss Christine Hilderbrand, is a native of Germany, and was born May 4, 1826; she came to the United States in 1847, and came the same year to Stephenson Co. The following year, in October, 1848, she was united in marriage to Mortimer Snow, a native of Hamilton Co., N. Y.; they moved on a farm in Silver Creek Township and engaged in farming. When the war broke out he enlisted in 1861 in the 46th I. V. I.; he was wounded in the battle of Shiloh, and was afterward discharged on account of wounds received in that battle. He subsequently died in 1870, leaving five children — Ella, Carrie, Frank, Hattie and Fred. There are few persons who more fully understood the hardships of early settlers than Mrs. Snow; when they began farming, she lived in a small cabin without any floor, or doors, or windows, except blankets; having enjoyed the advantages of a good education, she was determined that her children should not suffer for want of similar advantages; they left the farm and came to the city. Ella, now Mrs. John Hea, and Carrie were both graduates of the high school in 1878. Mrs. Snow is a lady of energy and good business management; she still owns the farm in Silver Creek Township, and also owns city property.

CHARLES P. SNOW, gardener and grower of small fruits; is a native of Madison Co., N. Y., and was born July 22, 1829; his parents came West to Illinois, and arrived in Stephenson Co. in September, 1837, and settled in Silver Creek Township; after reaching manhood, he lived in Iowa for some years. After the war broke out he enlisted in the 38th .Regiment I. V. I., Co. C; he was in the siege of Vicksburg, and at Yazoo City. Black River and Banks' expedition, and at other places; he was slightly wounded before Vicksburg; he served over three years. Since the war he has lived in Freeport, and engaged in fruit-growing. In April, 1851, Mr. Snow was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Brown, from New York: they have nine children — Luella, John, Oscar, Arthur, Philo, Minnie, Katie, Roxina and Melvina.

W. H. SNOOKS, of the firm of Galloway & Snooks, proprietor of the Freeport Soda-water Manufactory, corner Jackson and Walnut streets; is a native of Bedford Co., Penn., and was born Nov. 20, 1838; when seven years of age he came to Michigan, and grew up to manhood there; he came to Stephenson Co. in 1861, and located in Freeport; he associated with his present partner in 1873 and engaged in their present business, and they have established a good trade. In 1859 Mr. Snooks was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Snyder, a native of Ohio.

J. H. SNYDER, proprietor of steam planing-mill and pump-factory, corner Adams and Bridge streets; is a native of Lewisburg, Penn., and was born July 13, 1836; he grew up to manhood there; he came West to Stephenson Co. in 1853, and remained in Freeport one year, and then returned East; in April, 1857, he came to Freeport and located permanently; the following year he entered the dry goods store of William Walton, where he remained three years; in 1862, he established his present business, and has successfully carried it on for the past eighteen years, and has built up a large trade. He has held the office of City Alderman. In October, 1859, Mr. Snyder was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth E. Chapman, a native of Ohio; they have six children — Cora A., W. Gr., Hattie J., Eugene I., Carrie and Laura Belle.

PROF. C. C. SNYDER, Superintendent of Schools of the city of Freeport; is a native of Clinton Co., Penn., and was born Feb. 22, 1842; he came West in boyhood; he attended the common schools and completed his education at the Northwestern University, at Evanston, Ill., and afterward engaged in teaching in Belvidere, in this State, and in Lyons. Iowa; he came to Freeport in 1872, and accepted the position of Superintendent of Schools of the city, and under his able management the schools of the city have been raised to a high standard. Prof. Snyder was united in marriage, Jan. 1, 1868, to Miss A. Vernette Forbes, daughter of J. S. Forbes, one of the earliest settlers of Stephenson Co.; Prof, and Mrs. Snyder have four children — Waldo S., Maud, Karl F. and Vernette.

DR. K. T. STABECK, editor of the Freeport Budget; is a native of Stephenson Co., and was born Feb. 20, 1853; he grew up and received his education in this State; after completing his literary course he began reading medicine; he pursued his medical studies in Philadelphia two years and in Chicago for two years, and graduated at Rush Medical College in 1873. After graduating he engaged in the practice of medicine in this county. In 1875, he went to Europe, and took a special course in medicine at the Government State University at Christiania, the capital of Norway; upon his return he resumed the practice of his profession. In 1873, Dr. Stabeck established the Davis Budget, and conducted that paper until 1876, when he came to Freeport. In March, 1877, he bought the Illinois Monitor, and changed its name and established the Freeport Budget, and has successfully conducted the paper since then, and, through his energy, it has the largest circulation of any paper in the county.

J. H. STAVER, of the firm of Staver & Snyder, dealers in boots and shoes, Stephenson street; is a native of Clinton Co., Penn., and was born March 23, 1832; he grew up to manhood in that State; he came West and located in Freeport in 1855, and established his present business in 1861, and has successfully carried it on for the past nineteen years. In 1861, Mr. Staver was united in marriage to Miss Amelia Jewell, daughter of Hollis Jewell, one of the oldest and most honored residents of Freeport; Mr. and Mrs. Staver have six children — Charles. Mary, Nellie, Anna, Willie and Bertha.

J. H. STEARNS, attorney at law, of the firm of Neff & Stearns, Stephenson street; is a native of New Hampshire, and was born Jan. 9, 1841; his parents came West to Wisconsin during his early boyhood; he attended school there, and entered Harvard College, and graduated in 1862; he came to Freeport in 1871; studied law with Judge Bailey and Hon. J. I. Neff, and was admitted to the bar in May, 1878, and the following September he became a partner of Mr. Neff, Judge Bailey having been elected to the bench. Mr. Stearns holds the office of City Attorney. In May, 1869, he was united in marriage to Miss Ruth Chapin, of the city of Dubuque.

OWEN E. STEARNS, homoeopathic physician; was born in the town of Phelps, Ontario Co., N. Y., Aug. 20, 1827, his parents being Joel and Nancy (Edmonston) Stearns; he was educated at the Phelps High School, and, upon leaving this institution, commenced the study of medicine, for the practice of which he developed early an inclination; he entered the Homoeopathic Medical College of Cleveland, Ohio, pursued its full course, and graduated with a fine record in 1850. In the spring of the following year he removed to Freeport, Ill., where he began his practice, and soon acquired a substantial reputation for skill and efficiency, and secured a very large and lucrative patronage. He was subsequently elected Vice President of the first Homoeopathic Medical Society of Northern Illinois, being then quite young in the profession. He has at all times a deep interest in movements for promoting and perfecting the existing systems of popular education, and was President of the Board of Education of Freeport, having been a member of this body six years. In a very great measure to his efforts is due the high standard attained by the schools of that city. Both professionally and socially he stands in high estimation, and ever since his residence in Freeport has been regarded as one of its leading citizens. He is one of the senior practitioners of that place, and the success of his labors has, to a very large extent, popularized the
system of homoeopathy.

H. S. STEVENSON, dealer in groceries and provisions, No. 93 Stephenson street; is a native of Morgan Co., Ill., and was born July 1, 1846; he grew up to manhood, and received his education in this State. During the war, he enlisted and served in the 146th I. V. I. He came to Freeport in 1872, and established his present business in 1875; he has two stores, one on Galena street and one on Stephenson street; has built up a large trade. In 1871, Mr. Stevenson was united in marriage to Miss Louise Rosenstiel, daughter of C. H. Rosenstiel; they have three children — William, Edward and Clare.

W. A. STEVENS, dealer in dry goods and notions, No. 102 Stephenson street; is a native of Castine, Hancock Co., Me.; he grew up and attended school there; after reaching manhood he went to Boston, and remained there about ten years; he came West to Stephenson Co., and located in Freeport in 1862, and engaged in the dry goods trade, and has continued in the business for the past eighteen years, and has built up a large trade. Tn 1859, Mr. Stevens was united in marriage to Miss Mary W. Wells, a native of Maine; they have two children— one daughter, Mary, and one son, William.

ISAAC STINE, deceased; was a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, and emigrated to the United States in 1847; he came to Stephenson Co. in 1852, and located in Freeport, and, with his brother, engaged in the clothing business; they were the pioneers in this branch of trade, and carried on the business here for twenty-seven years, until his death, which occurred Sept. 11, 1879. W. A. Stine is a son of the late Isaac Stine, the pioneer clothing dealer of Freeport, and was born May 18, 1857; he grew up, and during boyhood he entered his father's store; in February, 1880, he engaged in his present business, the firm being Stine & Kern, and they are building up a good trade.

LEONARD STOSKOPF, attorney at law, corner Stephenson and Chicago streets; is a native of Canada, and was born Oct. 5, 1840; his parents came to Illinois and located in Stephenson Co. in 1841; he grew up and attended school here, and studied law with Mr. Mitchell, and was admitted to the bar in 1873; after being admitted, he engaged in the practice of law, and since then has practiced his profession here. He has held the office of Police Magistrate. In 1874, Mr. Stoskopf was united in marriage to Miss Susanna Hunt, daughter of Thomas Hunt, Esq., of Ridott Township, one of the early settlers of this county; they have two daughters — Florence and Mary.

LOUIS STOSKOPF, physician and surgeon, corner Stephenson and Exchange streets; is a native of Stephenson Co., and was born in the city of Freeport, Nov. 14, 1842; he grew up and attended school here, then went to Ann Arbor, Mich.; after attending the high school there, he entered the classical department of the University of Michigan, and remained two years, then entered the same class in Yale College, and graduated in the class of 1865; while in Yale College, he was a member of the university crew, and rowed in 1864 and 1865; after completing his collegiate course, he studied medicine, and attended lectures at Rush Medical College, Chicago, and graduated in the medical department of Columbia College, in 1869; after graduating, he engaged in the practice of medicine in his native city, and has, since then, practiced his profession here; he has served as Secretary of the Stephenson County Society of Physicians and Surgeons, and is now Vice President of the society. Dr. Stoskopf was united in marriage, Oct. 1, 1873, to Miss Caroline H. Brewster, daughter of Daniel S. Brewster; they have two children — one son, William, and one daughter, Alice Louise.

VALENTINE STOSKOPF, [illustration], wholesale and retail dealer in flour and feed, corner Galena and Exchange streets; was born in Strasbourg, France, April 4, 1817; he came to the United States in 1837, and lived in New Jersey a short time, then removed to Canada. While living there, in October, 1839, he was united in marriage to Miss Catharine Schoup, a native of Strasburg, France; they came West to Illinois, and arrived in Stephenson Co. in July, 1841, and settled in Freeport; he engaged in working at his trade of blacksmith; he and M. Hettinger had a shop located on the Branch, on Spring street; they have done good work, and they often speak of the times when they used to work early and late in the little shop on Spring street; Mr. Stoskopf carried on the business successfully for many years; in 1872, he engaged in the milling business, and has carried it on since then; when he came to this country, he had but very little; he has, by his own efforts and good management, become one of the most successful and substantial citizens of Freeport; he has done much to build up and improve the city. He has held the office of Assistant Supervisor, and other town offices. Mr. and Mrs. Stoskopf have eight children — Leonard, Louis, Michael, John, Mary A., Sarah, Emma and Ella.

D. C. STOVER, inventor and manufacturer, corner of Stephenson and Walnut streets; is a native of the State of Pennsylvania, and was born in Greencastle, Franklin Co., May 9, 1840; he grew up and attended school there; after reaching manhood, he came West to Illinois, in 1862, and settled in Carroll Co., where he remained a few years, then came to Stephenson Co., and located in Freeport. Mr. Stover has given much time and study to invention, and has taken out several valuable patents; he invented and has been engaged in manufacturing “cultivators” “Stover's wind-mill,” and Stover's machine for manufacturing barbs and placing them on the wire for fences, the most complete and the principal machine of the kind now in use: the manufacturing interests of Freeport owe more to Mr. Stover than to any other person. Mr. Stover was united in marriage to Miss Mary Clare Porter, daughter of the late Dr. Porter, of Lanark, Carroll Co., Ill.; they have two children — one daughter, May, and one son, Porter.

D. H. SUNDERLAND, Supervisor of Census for the Second Census District of Illinois, Opera House Block; is a native of Addison Co., Vt., and was born July 26, 1822; he grew up and received his education in that State; after reaching manhood he came West to Illinois, and arrived in Stephenson Co., in July 1845; he engaged in teaching, and afterward entered as clerk in the store of O. H. Wright. In 1855, he was elected County Clerk, and he held that office for ten years; he was elected a member of the Board of Supervisors, and was afterward elected Mayor of the city; he was appointed, in March, 1880, Supervisor of the Census of the Second Census District. Mr. Sunderland has lived in this county thirty-five years; he was much interested in educational interests, and has been actively identified with the interests of the county. He was united in marriage June 4, 1850, to Miss Frances Barrett, a native of Essex Co., Vt. She died in April, 1861, leaving two sons — Byron H., in the postal service, and David E., studying dentistry in this city.

GEORGE F. SWARTS, of the firm of S warts & Stockings, wholesale and retail dealers in drugs and medicines, paints and oils, 137 Stephenson street; is a native of Centre Co., Penn., and was born April 21, 1839; he grew up and attended school there, and when 16 years of age, came West to Illinois, lived two years in De Kalb Co., and in 1857 came to Stephenson Co.; in 1861, he entered the drug store of Emmert & Burrell and served an apprenticeship of four years, and became thoroughly familiar with the business; in 1865, he associated with J. W. Neff and engaged in the drug trade; after four years he sold his interest to Mr. Neff; he established his present business, and has, by his energy and close attention to business, built up a large trade; he had nothing when he began life; he has been successfully engaged in business for the past fifteen years. Mr. Swarts was united in marriage, April 18, 1864, to Miss Cornelia M. Smith, a native of Newport, N. Y.

CHARLES F. TAGGART, clerk, railway postal service, is a native of Northumberland Co., Penn., and was born Dec. 8, 1822; after retching manhood he came West to Illinois, and arrived in Stephenson Co. in Dec. 1846; he entered land and engaged in farming. In 1858, he was elected Sheriff of Stephenson Co. and held that office two years. After the war broke out, he raised a company, which became Company D, 93d I. V. I., and was elected and commissioned Captain without a dissenting vote; he was slightly wounded before Vicksburg; he participated in a number of battles; their battle-flag bears the record of nineteen battles; he served until February, 1865. Since his return he has held the office of Assessor, and is now in the railway postal service. In October, 1853, Capt. Taggart was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Smith, of Northumberland Co., Penn.; they have three children — Frank, engaged in business here; Anna B., and William H., practicing dentistry.

F. S. TAGGART, proprietor of Taggart's machine shop and foundry, corner Mechanic and Spring streets; is a native of Stephenson Co., and was born in Ridott Township, Aug. 21, 1848; when 10 years of age his parents removed here in the city, and he grew up and attended school here, and graduated at the high school; after graduating, he engaged in teaching for a short time; having a taste for machinery, he went to Chicago and entered the machine shops of the Chicago & Northwestern R. R.; in January, 1876, he established his present business; he had very little to begin with, but, being a thorough, practical machinist, he, by close attention to every detail of his business, has established a large trade; he is a natural mechanic; when only 14 years of age, he built a small steam engine, perfect in all of its parts; he had only poor, imperfect tools to work with, yet the engine ran perfectly. He has held the position of Assistant Fire Marshal. In November, 1875, Mr. Taggart was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Rowell, a native of Stephenson Co.; she was born in Ridott Township.

W. H. TAGGART, dental surgeon, corner Stephenson and Van Buren streets; is a native of Stephenson Co., and was born March 23, 1855; he grew up and attended school here, and is a graduate of the high school; after graduating he studied his profession in the city of Philadelphia, and, graduating at the Philadelphia Dental College in the class of 1878, he returned to his native city, and since then has practiced his profession here, and has taken a leading position in his profession.

HORACE TARBOX, Western pioneer, operator in real estate; was born in Onondaga Co., N. Y., Dec. 7, 1817; his parents were Peter Tarbox and Mary (Woodruff) Tarbox; his education was acquired at the common schools, located in the vicinity of his home; in early life he was engaged, for a time, in working on the Erie Canal; in 1841, he turned to the West, and, settling in Freeport, Ill., established himself there in the hotel and livery business, which he prosecuted for several years; he interested himself at the same time, also, in the lumber trade, and in building operations; in 1850, he went to Council Bluffs, Iowa, and to Omaha, Neb., where he found employment in opening up farming lands, and in pioneer and settler work generally, while dealing largely, always, in stock of every description; he was the first to carry a plow into Colorado, and with it to break the virgin soil, formerly the camping-ground of the Indian or the bed of wolf and buffalo; in 1859, he settled in Boulder City, and engaged there in his customary pioneer work, buying land, which he would improve and sell; in 1865 and 1866, he returned to Freeport, Ill., and speculated largely in land, buying, building and other real estate operations; in 1870, he again went West, to Sioux City, Neb., where he was similarly occupied; from that locality he traveled to Sidney, Col., and thence to Grand Island, Neb., continually engaged in land speculations, and in buying, selling and raising stock; his home and family have, since 1841, been in Freeport, but from that date down to the present time the greater portion of his life has been passed in the further Western section of the country, where he has continued to open up prairie land, form farms, build, deal in stock, and to interest himself in pioneer frontier labors in general; he h is spent several winters in Florida, and owns property in Gainesville, and also has two orange groves near there. When Mr. Tarbox came here he had only $500, and, by his energy and good management, has become one of Freeport's most successful citizens. In 1841, Mr. Tarbox was united in marriage to Miss Mary Van Pelt, a native of Penn Yan, N. Y.; they have three children — two daughters, both married Mary, (now Mrs. Moore, living in Sidney, Neb.), Jennie (now Mrs. Bridgeford, living in Chicago ), and one son, Frank, at home.

N. F. TAYLOR, dealer in surgical instruments, Opera House Block, 118 Stephenson street; is a native of New Hampshire; he grew up and received his education in that State; he came West to Minnesota in 1855, and engaged in the mercantile business; remained in that State nine years, and in 1864 came to Stephenson Co., and located in Freeport. In 1846, Mr. Taylor was united in marriage to Miss Esther W. Colby, a native of New Hampshire; she received her education there: she studied medicine, and is a graduate of Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago, and has, since graduating in 1872, successfully practiced her profession in this city. They have one daughter — Vashti C.

OSCAR TAYLOR, attorney at law and senior member of the firm of O. Taylor & Son, abstractors and insurance agents, corner of Clay and Exchange streets; is a native of Saratoga Co., N. Y., and was born Feb. 16, 1822; when only 16 years of age he came West to Joliet, Ill. in 1838, and lived one year in Joliet and then came to Rockford, and was one of the early settlers of that place; he was elected Town Clerk, and was the first person elected to that office in Rockford; he remained there three years, and came to Freeport in 1842, and was connected with mercantile business for five years; he studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1850, and engaged in the practice of law. Mr. Taylor has a complete set of abstract books for Stephenson Co., and also transacts insurance business; he was elected Justice of the Peace in 1850. Mr. Taylor was united in marriage, Aug. 2, 1842, to Miss Malvina M. Snow, a native of Madison Co., N. Y.; they have had six children, three of whom are living — Louise W., Oscar L. (now in college), and Sallie J.

JOHN B. TAYLOR, manufacturer and wholesale and retail dealer in leather, shoe-findings and saddlery hardware, 41 and 43 Stephenson street; is a native of Madison Co., N. Y.; he came to Stephenson Co. and settled in Freeport in 1852, and began currying leather within the next two years; he became a member of the firm of F. Baker & Co., which was succeeded by the firm of Taylor & Rubel, which continued for seven years, and since then Mr. Taylor has conducted the business; in 1865, he built a tannery, and engaged in the tanning business; in 1878, the tannery was destroyed by fire; he rebuilt the following year, in a very substantial manner; Mr. Taylor's large and commodious double store, Nos. 41 and 43 Stephenson street, erected for conducting his business, is one of the finest in the State, and he has a large established trade. Mr. Taylor is one of the most public-spirited citizens of Freeport; he laid out and equipped, at his own expense, what is widely known as “Taylor's Driving Park,” which is acknowledged to be the most complete in its arrangement of any track in the West; when Mr. Taylor began life he had nothing, and he owes his success to his own efforts; he has done his full share in building up and beautifying the city, contributing liberally to all the various enterprises in that direction; he has no taste for office; though he has been repeatedly solicited to accept the nomination for Mayor of the city, he has steadily declined.

S. F. TAYLOR, proprietor livery, sale and boarding stable, corner of Bridge and Chicago streets; is a native of Strafford Co., N. H., and was born June 5, 1821; he grew up there until 17 years of age; he came West to Illinois, and located in Stephenson Co. in December, 1855; he engaged in the staging and livery business, and has carried it on for twenty-five years, a longer time than any one else in the same business. In 1846, Mr. Taylor was united in marriage to Miss Franceno Prescott, a native of Bristol, N. H.; they have two children — Julia M. (now Mrs. S. O. Clayton, living here), Ellen F. (now Mrs. L. J. Philip, living in Polo).

W. B. THOMAS, foreman of the printing office of the Freeport Journal; is a native of York Co., Penn., and was born Feb. 21, 1843; his parents came to Stephenson Co. in 1848; he grew up and attended school here; entered the Journal office in the fall of 1861, and learned the printing trade, and, with the exception of one year in Pittsburgh, and one year in the office of the County Clerk, he has been connected with the Journal office since then. In 1867, Mr. Thomas was united in marriage to Miss Mary F. Welch, a native of Delaware, Ohio; they have one son — Freddie G.

FRANK J. TRUNK, brick manufacturer, Galena avenue; is a native of Germany, and was born April 1, 1843; his parents came to America in 1847, and came to Freeport in 1851; he grew up to manhood here; his father established the business; Frank has carried on the business since 1868, and has a large trade. He married Miss Annie Marks, a native of Jo Daviess Co., June 8, 1869; they have four children — John. Matilda, Nellie and Rose.

E. VAN SLOOTEN, wholesale dealer in leaf tobacco and foreign exchange; residence corner Galena avenue and Galena street; is a native of Germany, and was born in the Kingdom of Hanover Sept. 25, 1828; his father was a merchant, and he grew up and became educated in that business; he emigrated to the United States in 1850, and came the same year to Stephenson Co.; in 1857 he engaged in mercantile business, and for some years transacted a large trade; his sales have amounted to $150,000 in one year; in 1873 Mr. Van Slooten, with his family, went to Europe and made an extended visit, and since then he has been engaged in his present business. Mr. Van Slooten married Miss Jette Kroeger, a native of Hanover, Germany; they have two children — Nattie and Adele.

AUGUSTUS F. VOIGT, of the firm of Schmich & Voigt, dealers in groceries and provisions, Galena avenue, between Stephenson and Galena streets; is a native of Stephenson Co., and was born in the town of Lena, Feb. 1, 1852; he grew up and received his education here; he associated with Mr. Schmich, and they established their present business in July, 1876, and they are building up a good trade. Mr. Voigt was united in marriage, Nov. 18, 1879, to Miss Mary Seyfarth, daughter of Charles Seyfarth, of this city.

JOHN R. WADDELL, of the firm of Waddell Brothers, manufacturers of sash, doors and blinds, corner Liberty and Spring streets; is a native of Stephenson Co., and was born March 27, 1846; his parents were early settlers; they came here in 1843; his father was a contractor and builder here until 1871, when he went to Chicago after the great fire, and is engaged in contracting there. John K. grew up to manhood and learned his trade here; engaged in building until 1876, when he engaged with his brother in their present business, and they are building up a large trade. After the breaking-out of the war, he enlisted in Co. A, 46th I. V. I.; he participated in a number of severe battles; he served three years. In November, 1869, he was united in marriage to Miss Hattie Chapman, a native of Ohio.

W. H. WAGNER, publisher of the Deutscher Anzeiger; is a native of Germany, and was born in Baden, March 14, 1841; he came with his parents to the United States, in 1852; his father established the Deutscher Anzeiger in 1853. The subject of this sketch entered the printing office when only 12 years of age; he has been connected with the paper since then, a period of twenty-seven years; in 1863, he became a partner with his father, the firm being William Wagner & Co.; upon the death of his father, in November, 1877, he assumed editorial management of the paper, and since then has occupied that position; in 1871, Mr. Wagner was elected City Treasurer, and in 1876 and 1877 he held the office of Assistant Supervisor. Mr. Wagner was united in marriage, May 14, 1861, to Miss Wilhelmina Seyfarth, of this city; they have seven children, all sons.

WILLIAM WALTON, dealer in dry goods, carpets, clothing and merchant tailoring, notions, etc., 104 and 106 Stephenson street; is a native of Birmingham, Eng.; he grew up to manhood and was educated to his present business; he came to the United States in 1855; he came to Chicago, where he remained a short time and in the fall of 1858 he came to Stephenson Co. and located in Freeport and engaged in the dry goods business at 88 Stephenson street; in 1860 he removed to the store now occupied by E. L. Cronkrite; in 1869 he removed to his present location, where he could have more room to meet the demands of his trade; he occupies two stores packed full of goods, and employs forty men; he carries the largest stock of goods of any merchant in Northern Illinois, and has the largest established trade of any dry goods house west of Chicago in this State. When Mr. Walton began life he had very little; he owes his success to his own efforts.

JOHN M. WALZ, manufacturer of barrels and firkins, No. 71 Galena street; is a native of Germany, and was born Sept. 10, 1833; he came to this country in 1853, and came to Stephenson Co. in 1856, and settled in Freeport and began working at the cooper's trade; in 1863, he engaged in business for himself, and has carried it on since then; he employs ten men, and has established a good trade. In 1862, he married Miss Lena Freidag, from New York State; they have seven children — Mary, Lena, Herman, Willie, Laura, Emma and an infant daughter not named. Mr. Walz belongs to the Germania Society.

E. C WARNER, book-keeper and cashier of the wholesale leather and saddlery hardware house of J. B. Taylor, 41 and 43 Stephenson street; is a native of Cook Co., Ill., and was born in the city of Chicago Feb. 10, 1841; he grew up and attended school there, then went East and completed his education. After the breaking-out of the rebellion, he enlisted in the 89th I. V. I.; after serving in the ranks three months, he was ordered on detached service; he served at the headquarters of Gen. Rosecrans, Gens. Thomas, Sherman and Garfield; after the war, he came to Freeport, and entered the employ of Mr. Taylor, and since then has occupied his present position. Mr. Warner was united in marriage, May 17, 1866, to Miss Jeannot Bigger, a native of Michigan; they have four children — Edwin. Hubert, Burt and Roy.

L. A. WARNER, manufacturer of Warner's patent door-springs, Chicago street, north of Jackson street; is a native of Montgomery Co., N. Y.; he was raised in Connecticut, and came West to Illinois in 1855, and located in Stephenson Co.; he engaged in contracting and building, and carried on that business about twelve years; he patented the door-springs in August, 1875, and engaged in their manufacture, and has built up a good trade. Mr. Warner married Miss Sarah D. Whittlesy, a native of Connecticut; they have five children — Carrie (now Mrs. Harrison, of Chicago), Andrew Clinton (now living in Dixon), Charles (now in Beloit College), G. Wilberforce (in business with his father) and Emma L.

REV. SANFORD WASHBURN, Pastor of the Embury Methodist Episcopal Church; is a native of the State of New York, and was born in Dutchess Co., at Fishkill, on the Hudson, Oct. 24, 1830; he grew up to manhood in that State, attending school there; he came West, and entered the Garret Biblical Institute at Evanston, where he pursued his theological studies and graduated in the class of 1861; after completing his studies, his first pastoral charge was at Momence; he has served acceptably and successfully as pastor in this conference at Wilmington, Plattville, Piano, Chicago, Plainfield and Morris, and came to Freeport in October, 1879. On the 19th of November, 1861, Mr. Washburn was united in marriage to Miss Mary Frances Booth, a native of Westfield, Ohio; they have four children — two daughters (Mina A. and Emily C.) and two sons (Frank B. and Arthur S.).

DAVID WEARY, contractor and builder, Pleasant street; is a native of Union Co., Penn.; and was born on March 1, 1829; he grew up to manhood in that State, and learned the trade of carpenter and joiner in Lycoming Co.; in 1860, he came West to Wisconsin, and in 1866 came to Freeport, and since then, for the past fourteen years, has been engaged in building here. In 1855, Mr. Weary was united in marriage to Miss Christiana Erwin, a native of Lycoming Co., Penn.; they have three children — Elsie, Jennie and Arthur; they have lost four children — Alvaretta, William, Edgar and Eugenia.

THOMAS WEBSTER, proprietor of the Freeport City Mills, east end Bridge street; is a native of Yorkshire, England, and was born Feb. 4, 1806; he grew up to manhood; lived there until 1851, when he came to this country, and during the same year came to Freeport; invested in farming lands; in 1866, he engaged in his present business, and has conducted the milling business for the past fourteen years, and they have an established trade. In 1841, Mr. Webster was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Bentley, a native of Yorkshire, England; they have eleven children, four sons and seven daughters. Mr. Webster and his family attend the Episcopal Church, and he has held the position of Senior Warden over twenty years.

DAVID T. WELD, photograph artist, 137 Stephenson street; is a native of Steuben Co., N. Y., and was born March 22, 1840; he grew up to manhood in Winnebago Co., Ill., and studied his profession there; after the breaking-out of the rebellion, he enlisted and served in Co. C, 16th Iowa V. I.; was wounded in the battle of Corinth; he came to Freeport in 1863, and established his present business, and his gallery is the oldest in the city; he has had a large experience and has superior facilities for making fine work.

JOHN WERTMAN, wagon manufacturer, Van Buren, north of Bridge street; is a native of Mercer Co., Penn., and was born in 1833; he grew up to manhood in that State, and learned his trade in Berks Co.; he came to Stephenson Co. in 1858, located in Freeport and engaged in wagon-making, and since then has continued in the business; he owns the place where he carries on his trade. In 1867, he married Sarah A. Ault, in this city; they have two children — Florence and Frances.

THOMPSON WILCOXON, pioneer settler of Illinois, and capitalist, was born in Milledgeville, Ga., Aug. 22, 1800; his parents were Thomas Wilcoxon, formerly engaged in farming and agricultural pursuits, and Mary (Hardy) Wilcoxon; he received a common-school education at Portsmouth, Ohio, to which locality his parents had removed while he was in his infancy; he was brought up upon his father's farm, laboring in the summer, and in the winter months attending school; subsequently, he was engaged in a partnership connection with three brothers in farming and sending produce to the market of New Orleans, La.; while thus occupied, they constructed their own boats, called “flat-boats” and in person piloted them down the Ohio River; in 1835, he visited the Northwestern district, accompanied by one of his brothers, on a prospecting tour, traveling on horseback, and guiding himself, in many cases, by following the Indian trails, for, in those days, roads were few and poor. In 1837, he again came to the Northwest, purposing to settle in a desirable locality, and decided to remain at the spot now known as Cedarville, distant about six miles from the present city of Freeport; associated with his brother, he purchased a claim there, took possession of the appropriated land and gradually transformed it into a well-cultivated farm; the district was then unsectionized, almost in a primitive state, and very sparsely settled; he continued farming until 1854, when he removed to Freeport, disposing of his land in Cedarville about three years afterward; he has since then resided permanently in the former town and engaged in real estate and building operations; among other enterprises which he has conducted to successful issues is the Freeport Opera House of which he is the builder and owner. Mr. Wilcoxon was united in marriage Dec. 23, 1830, to Miss Cyinda Mitchell, daughter of Judge Mitchell, of Scioto Co., Ohio; they have four children — Mary D., now married, living in Chicago; Thomas D., living here; Martha E., now married, living in Richmond, and Mitchell H., engaged here in the insurance business.

JACOB WILLIAMS, grain dealer, east side River, is a native of New York, and was born in the city of Buffalo Feb. 28, 1842; he grew up to manhood and received his education there; he came West in 1870, and located in Freeport and established his present business, and has a large shipping trade. In 1865, Mr. Williams was united in marriage to Miss M. A. J. P. Davy, from Niagara Falls, New York; they have one son, James D.

ADAM WILSON, retired, Galena avenue; is a native of New Jersey, and was born on Nov. 16, 1813; grew up to manhood, mostly in Pennsylvania; came West to Illinois by wagon, and located on Fox River, and was one of the early settlers there; he came to Stephenson Co. in 1843, and settled at Crain's Grove; he entered several hundred acres of land, and engaged in farming, which has since been his principal business, and he still owns a farm there. He has held the office of magistrate in this county for twelve years, and has also held other town and school offices. In 1835, Mr. Wilson was united in marriage to Miss Priscilla Lott, a native of Luzerne Co., Penn.; they have four children — Nancy, Lucy, Stephen and Frances.

JOHN H. WILSON, yardmaster of the Illinois Central R. R., at Freeport; is a native of Union Co., Penn.; he came West to Illinois and entered the employ of the Illinois Central R. R. in 1857. After the breaking-out of the rebellion, he enlisted in the 11th I. V. I., Co. H; after his return from the service he again resumed his connection with the Illinois Central; in 1867, he was appointed yardmaster, and since that time, for the past thirteen years, he has held that position in this city.

E. B. WINGER, manufacturer of the Stover Wind Engine and Winger Feed Grinder, Stephenson street, corner Adams; is a native of Pennsylvania, and was born in Lancaster Co., on Sept. 24, 1837; he grew up in Franklin Co., and received his education in that State; after reaching manhood he was successfully engaged in the mercantile business at Greencastle, Franklin Co., for fourteen years; he came to Stephenson Co. in March, 1877, and located in Freeport, and engaged in his present business; he is building up a large and extensive trade throughout the different States. Mr. Winger was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth B. Stover, a native of Greencastle, Penn., in April 18, 1861; they have four children, all sons.

GEORGE WOLF, Justice of the Peace and collecting agent, and has abstracts of titles to lands in Stephenson Co., Galena avenue, opposite court house; is a native of Centre Co., Penn., and was born Dec. 3, 1827; he grew up and attended school there; after reaching manhood he came West to Illinois and located in Stephenson Co.; in May, 1849, engaged in teaching during the winter seasons; in 1851, he engaged in painting, and carried on that business for ten years; he belonged to a military organization; on the 4th of July, 1861, the company went to Belvidere to celebrate, and Mr. Wolf met with the serious misfortune of losing his arm by a premature discharge of a cannon. Mr. Wolf has held the office of Justice of the Peace for many years, also held office of Assessor and Collector; he has set of abstract books of titles to lands in Stephenson Co. In 1854, Mr. Wolf married Angeline Fleming, from Virginia; she died in January. 1880, leaving six children — Charles C, Kate B., Sadie E., Winnie, Agnes and Nellie.

H. WOODMANSE, manufacturer of Woodmanse's wind engine, wind-mill pumps and feed mills, Helena street and Railroad; is a native of Belmont Co., Ohio, and was born Oct. 14, 1836; he grew up and attended school there; after reaching manhood, he came to Illinois; in 1868, he came to Stephenson Co., and located in Freeport, and engaged in dealing in agricultural implements; he afterward bought the property where he is now located and established his present business, and has built up a large trade, extending through the Western States. In 1866, Mr. Woodmanse was united in marriage to Miss Helen Barnes, a native of Sycamore, DeKalb Co., Ill.

O. H. WRIGHT, [illustration], deceased; the subject of this sketch was one of the earliest settlers of Stephenson Co.; he was born in Shoreham, Addison Co., Vt., in the year 1812; he grew up and attended school there, and completed his education in Canada; after reaching manhood, he came West to Illinois, and arrived in Freeport in December, 1836; he engaged in mercantile business, and, with the exception of Mr. Crocker, who opened a store for a short time, Mr. Wright was the first established merchant in Freeport. Two years after coming here, on the 15th of January, 1838, Mr. Wright was united in marriage to Miss Mary M. Atkinson, a native of Durham, England. Mr. Wright held the offices of Probate Judge and County Recorder; he was prominently interested in getting the railroad here, and had the bridge built across the river; he laid out the east part of the town; he was actively identified with all the interests of the city and county; he was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church, and was prominent in the organization of that church in Freeport; he was noted for his generosity and kindness of heart, and was ever ready to aid the needy and the afflicted. His death occurred in March, 1851; he left two children — one daughter, Mary S., now Mrs. John Scott, living in Iowa, and one son, William O., now engaged in business here in this city.

O. P. WRIGHT, of the firm of J. W. Henney & Co., manufacturers of carriages, buggies and road wagons, corner Bridge and Adams streets; is a native of Stephenson Co., Ill., and was born April 5, 1855; he grew up and attended school, and then served apprenticeship in his present business; he has been a member of the firm since 1875. Mr. Wright was united in marriage, May 28, 1879, to Miss Louise Bennethun, a native of Cedarville, Stephenson Co., Ill.

W. H. YATES, postal clerk, railway mail service; is a native of Montgomery Co., N. Y., and was born Dec. 25, 1831; he came to Stephenson Co. and located in Freeport March 3, 1853; he entered the railway mail service in 1861, on the Western Union B. B., from Freeport to Racine, and has been in the service continuously for nineteen years, and is the oldest postal clerk now in the service west of Chicago. Mr. Yates was united in marriage, May 29, 1854, to- Miss Addie Turner, of Marshall, Mich.; she died June 19, 1876, leaving two children — one son, Ralph T., and one daughter, Ida.

I. S. ZARTMAN, proprietor of the Pennsylvania House, corner Stephenson and Chicago streets; is a native of Lancaster Co., and was born Sept. 18, 1823; he grew up to manhood there, and came West to Iowa, and arrived in Stephenson Co. July 11, 1853, and began working at the trade of carpenter and joiner; he was engaged in building for seven years; in 1863, he opened the Pennsylvania House, and has continued in the hotel business for the past seventeen years; it is the oldest hotel in the city under the same name. Mr. Zartman holds the office of City Alderman. He was united in marriage, Jan. 3, 1854, to Miss Elizabeth E. Baker, a native of Lancaster Co., Penn.; they have one son — Harvey B.; they have lost two children — one son and one daughter.

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Remarkable Stories, Volume 1
by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a Licensed Massage Therapist and Life Coach. An amateur historian, parts of these stories and many more appear on his website, www.robertbike.com.

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KENT TOWNSHIP

CHARLES BERHENKE, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Lena; born Sept. 18, 1829, in Lippe Detmold, Germany; December, 1853, he came to Stephenson County; he owns 80 acres of land, which he has improved; among other improvements is a well-arranged barn, which cost about $750. He married Henrietta Jasper, in 1859; she was born in Germany; they have eleven children — four sons and seven daughters.

WILLIAM H. BOOP, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Yellow Creek; born April 13, 1844, in Union County, Pa.; in 1858, he came with his parents to Kent Township; he owns 90 acres of land. He enlisted, in 1864, in Co. E, 45th I. V. I.; served to the end of the war. Married Maria Mishler, in 1871; she was born in Indiana; they have two children — George and Cora.

DANIEL BROWN, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Lena; born Aug. 19, 1829, in Ireland; in 1832, he came with his parents to Monroe County, N. Y.; in 1840, they came to Whiteside County, Ill.; in 1848, he came to Stephenson County; in 1850, he went to California, followed mining two years and teaming five years; he then returned to Stephenson County, where he has since lived; has been School Director and twelve years Commissioner of Highways. Married Bridget Murphy, April 8, 1858; she was born in Canada; they have seven children — Mary A., Sarah, Isabel, Edward, Ellen, Daniel and Catharine; lost John, aged 4 years.

BRYAN DUFFY, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Elroy; he was born, in 1824, in Ireland; in 1846, he came to New Jersey, and, in the fall, came to Stephenson County, where he has since lived; he owns 60 acres of land. Married Ann Harty, in 1844; she was born in Ireland; they have seven children — four sons and three daughters.

SAMUEL EISENBISE, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Kent; born Oct. 27, 1839, in Miami Co., Ohio; in 1849, he came with his parents to Indiana; in 1859, he came to Carroll Co., Ill.; in 1877, he came to his present farm; he owns 65 acres of land. He married Mary A. Gilbert Sept. 22, 1876; she was born in Pennsylvania; they have one child — William.

M. EISLEY, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Kent; born Dec. 28, 1839, in Germany; in 1856, he came to Stephenson County: he removed to this locality in 1860; he owns 340 acres of land; has been Township Supervisor and Township Clerk, and has held about all the township offices. He married Miss Nancy J. Carter in 1863; she was born in New York; they have two children — Carrie and Rollin.

HENRY W. FARINGER, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Lena; he was born Oct. 9, 1829. in York Co., Penn.; in 1854, he came to Stephenson County; he owns 163 acres of land. He married Miss Lydia Fry in 1858; she was born in Ohio; they have a family of six sons.

JACOB GABLE, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Kent; born Sept. 21, 1805, in Union Co., Penn.; when a boy, he was apprenticed to the boot and shoe trade, and followed this about twenty years; in 1843, he came to Jefferson Township, and, two years later, he came to his present locality; he owns 320 acres of land, part of which he entered, and has it well improved. He was elected Justice of the Peace in 1851, and, with the exception of two years, has held this office ever since; he has been School Director, Township Supervisor, Highway Commissioner, etc. He married Elizabeth Machamer April 10, 1828; she was born in Union Co., Penn., May 12, 1808; they have had eleven children, nine living — three sons and six daughters. When in Pennsylvania, he served about seven years as Captain of the 6th Company, 43d Pennsylvania Militia; his son Jacob enlisted, in 1862, in the 93d I. V. I., and served to the end of the war.

MRS. L. S. GODDARD, wife of Newell Goddard (deceased), Sec. 6; P. O. Lena; he was born May 13, 1827, in Franklin Co., Vt.; in about 1849, he came to Stephenson County, remained here a few years, then returned to Vermont in about 1854; he then returned here and remained till the time of his death. He married Miss Lucretia S. Hotchkiss Oct. 20, 1856; she was born Dec. 11, 1837, in Franklin Co, Vt.; they have two children — Clara and Warren. She now owns 125 acres of land.

WILLIAM HEYER, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Lena; born Feb. 23, 1823, in Germany; in 1847 he came to Washington Co., Wis.; in 1867 he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 160 acres of land; married Justine Sander, in 1852; she was born July 24, 1829, in Germany; they have five children — William, Paul, Frank, Henry and Johanna.

JAMES A. HUGHES, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Lena; born March 3, 1841, in Ireland; in 1851, he came with his parents to Dutchess Co., N. Y.; in 1853 he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 120 acres of land, which he has improved. He has held the office of District School Clerk the past eleven years. Married Mary McGurk, in 1864, she was born in Maryland; they have seven children — four sons and three daughters.

PETER KLECKNER, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Kent; born Sept. 27, 1804, in Union Co., Penn.; in 1850 he came to his present farm; he owns over 700 acres of land; he has been six years County Superintendent. Married Catharine Wolf, in 1835; she was born in Union Co. Penn., in 1814; died in 1870; they have eight children living — Elizabeth Ann, Emma, Jane A., Ada, Soloman J., Peter A., John M. and Henry C. George W. was killed at the battle of Lookout Mountain, in 1864; John M., Henry C. and Peter A. also served in the late war. Attended the German Reformed Church; he was a Republican in politics.

JOHN MADER, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Kent; born Dec. 14, 1830, in Union Co., Penn.; in 1856, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 85 acres of land; is School Director. Married Eliza Bogenreif, May 31, 1857; she was born in Union Co., Penn.; had seven children, four living — George, Samuel, Charles and Adam.

JOHN J. MERRICK, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Lena; born Feb. 14, 1823, in Tompkins Co., N. Y.; in 1847 he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; he owns about 310 acres of land, which was entered by himself and brother. He married Miss Elizabeth Mcintosh, in 1848; she was born in Tompkins Co., N. Y.; they have one daughter — Mary E., now Mrs. Daughenbaugh.

EMANUEL MISHLER, farmer, .See. 31; P. O. Yellow Creek; born Sept. 13, 1822, in Lancaster Co., Penn.; in 1844, he came to Summit Co., Ohio; he followed the tailoring trade here about four years, having learned this trade in Pennsylvania; in 1848, he came to Elkhart Co., Ind.; in 1850, he removed to Stephenson County; he owns 535 acres of land; has been Assistant Commissioner of Highways, School Trustee and Director. Married Susannah Mishler Sept. 10, 1846; she was born in Stark Co., Ohio, March 2, 1825; they have nine children — Maria, Elizabeth J., John F., Phares, Calvin H., James L., Susan S., Levi and Marcus.

L. W. MOGLE, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Kent; born Sept. 20, 1840, in Centre Co., Penn.; in 1846, he came with his parents to Stephenson Co.; he owns 245 acres of land; he enlisted in 1863 in the 46th I. V. I., Co. B, and served two years; he is School Director, Commissioner of Highways, etc. Married Harriet Sansman in 1866; she was born in Union Co., Penn; they had four children, three living — George A., Luetta and Burton S.

O. H. PHILLIPS, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Kent; born Feb. 18, 1823, in Windham Co., Vt.; in 1844, he came to Chicago, thence to Elgin, Ill.; in 1845, he came to Stephenson County and entered 40 acres of land; in 1846, he returned to Elgin. In 1847, he enlisted in the 2d Regiment I. V. I. in the Mexican war, under Capt. Edward Harvey; served thirteen months, for which he received a land-warrant for 160 acres of land. They now own 280 acres; in 1849, he returned to Stephenson County; remained here till 1867, when he removed to Tipton Co., Tenn.; there he engaged in the nursery business till 1879, when he returned to his present farm. He married Miss C Gable in 1851; she was born in Union Co., Penn., in 1831; died Jan. 25, 1880; have six children — Emma, now Mrs. Anderson; George P v Laura E., Jacob H., Nettie M. and Mary O.

GEORGE PIPER, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Lena; born Feb. 9, 1821, in Sussex Co., England; in 1849, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 80 acres of land. He married Miss Lois Buss, in 1854; she was born in 1838, in Sussex Co., England; they have four children — Rhoda, Arthur George, Ernest D. and Perley.

FRANK H. REBER, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Kent; born Jan. 11, 1850, in Jo Daviess County; in 1872, he came to this farm of 160 acres, which he rents from his father. Married Mary White in 1871; she was born in Jo Daviess County; they had four children, one living — Frank M.

J. W. RUSH, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Kent; born March 16, 1839, in Union Co., Penn.; in 1843 he came with his parents to Stephenson Co.; he owns 80 acres of land; is Township Collector; has been School Director, etc. Married Elizabeth Tipton, in 1865; she was born in Bedford Co., Penn.; they have seven children — two sons and five daughters.

DAVID SHEARER, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Lena; born May 2, 1822, in Perry Co., Penn.; at about the age of 20 he commenced to learn the stone and brick mason's trade; followed this about thirteen seasons; he then opened a store; continued this about three years; he then traded his store for a tannery; ran this about six years; in 1869, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns about 90 acres of land. When in Pennsylvania, he held the offices of Justice of the Peace, Assessor, etc. Married Lydia Hollenbaugh, in 1847; she was born in Perry Co., Penn.; they had ten children, seven living — James, Rebecca Jane, Charles B., George C, Samuel E., Robert C. and Benjamin F.

LOUIS WERNICKE, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Lena; born Sept. 3, 1834, in Germany; in 1854, he came to New York City; in 1856, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 107 acres of land. He entered the service in 1864, Co. G., 42d I. V. I.; served to the end of the war. Married Catherine Rudel, in 1860; she was born in 1842, in Germany; have four children — John, Emma, William and Henry.

WINSLOW TOWNSHIP
CAPT. WILLIAM I. BRADY, druggist and Postmaster, Winslow; born June 1, 1841, in Pittsburg, Penn.; in 1865, he came to Winslow; he was appointed Postmaster in 1875. He married Miss Mary Rayhorn, Oct. —, 1877; she was born in Pennsylvania; they have one son — Lester B. Republican in politics.

HENRY CHAWGO, proprietor of American House, Winslow; born Dec. 22, 1829, in Sullivan Co., N. Y.; in 1854, he came to Stephenson Co.; followed farming till 1875, when he removed to Winslow, and took charge of this hotel. Married Harriet Vaughn, March, 1849; she was born in New York; they have five children — one son and four daughters. Republican in politics.

LE GRAND M. COX, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Winslow; born Sept. 6, 1829, in Genesee Co., N. Y.; in September, 1839, he came to Stephenson Co.; he served eighteen months in the Mexican war, and received a land-warrant for 160 acres; he now owns 140 acres; enlisted in August, 1862, in Company A, 92d I. V. I., as Sergeant; served two and a half years; was wounded Sept. 19, 1863, at the battle of Chickamauga; has been School Director, Township Collector and Treasurer. Married Eveline Talmadge April 23, 1856; she was born in Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, Nov. 10, 1834; they have six children— Charles T., Hattie A. (now Mrs. F. T. Wire), Nellie B., Frank R., Mary E. and Legrand M.

WILLIAM COX, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Winslow; born Jan. 30, 1823, in Oneida Co., N. Y.; in 1839 he came to. Stephenson Co.; he owns 140 acres of land, which he entered; has been Assessor, Collector, School Treasurer, Road Commissioner; he now is County Superintendent — has served eight years; he enlisted in 1862, in Co. A, 92d I. V. I.; served to the end of the war; was wounded at the battle of Chenango, and Aiken, S. C. Married Miss Ermina Phillips January, 1852; she was born in Ohio; they have four children — William Jr., Edward, Levitt H. and John. Presbyterian in religion; Republican in politics.

MRS. LODUSKEY F. CRANDALL, formerly Miss Kennedy, Sec. 19; P. O. Winslow; she was born March 10, 1832, in Lorain Co., Ohio. She was married May 10, 1850, to Jonathan Lincoln; he was born May 19, 1827, in New York; in about 1844 he came with his parents to Stephenson Co., and settled on this present farm, which has since been divided; he died June 16, 1877. She now owns about 94 acres, with the homestead; they had four children, three living — Emeline (now Mrs. Wire), Effie (now Mrs. Wilber), and Nettie May. Her second marriage, to Samuel Crandall, occurred Aug. 28, 1878; he was born April 16, 1825; he has two children by a former marriage — Adelia and Caddie.

DR. I. L. CUTLER, physician and surgeon, Winslow; born Jan. 29, 1848, in Warren, Lake Co., Ill.; in 1865 he commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Whipple, of Nebraska; graduated in 1875. He married Miss Clara Sweely March 19, 1880; she was born in Lycoming Co., Pa.

GEORGE C. DE HAVEN, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Winslow; born Aug. 12, 1855, in Nora, Jo Daviess Co.; in 1857 he came with his parents to their present farm, consisting of 540 acres; his father died in 1872, aged 52 years. He married Miss Christie Phillips October, 1878; she was born in Pennsylvania; she came to Orangeville, Ill., when a child, with her parents.

OSCAR DE HAVEN, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Winslow; born April 12 1854, in Stephenson County; his father died in March, 1855, aged 25 years; he and his mother own and occupy this farm, consisting of 160 acres, formerly entered by his grandfather; his mother was born in Scioto Co., Ohio, in 1827.

SILAS GAGE, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Winslow; born Nov. 7, 1813, in Susquehanna Co., Penn.; May 15, 1835, he came to Stephenson County; he owns 244 acres of land, part of which he entered. Married Harriet M. Eells in November, 1836; she was born in Cattaraugus Co., N. Y.; she came with her parents to Illinois in 1834; they had eleven children; six are living — Isaac V., Amon S., Amelia, Ellen, Mary and Phebe; Isaac V. enlisted, in 1861, in Co. G, 46th I. V. I.; served to the end of the war. Republican in politics.

J. H. GAMBER, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Winslow; born April 25, 1825, in Ontario Co., N. Y.; when a child he came with his parents to Ashtabula Co., Ohio; in 1845, he came to Stephenson County; he owns 118 acres of land; has been Justice of the Peace, Township Supervisor one term, nine years School Director; has been classleader in the M. E. Church the past fifteen years; he is also Treasurer and Steward of this church. Married Miss Mary Cox in November, 1850; she was born in Jefferson Co., N. Y.; when she was 9 years old she came with her parents to Wisconsin; they have three children — Frank E., Ellen A., now Mrs. White, of Syracuse, N. Y., and Ida F. Republican in politics.

D. C. GAYLORD, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. Winslow; born Nov. 3, 1823, in Chautauqua Co., N. Y.; in 1839, he came to Stephenson County with his parents; he owns 220 acres of land, which he has improved. He enlisted, in 1862, in Co. A, 92 d I. V. I.; served thirteen months; was discharged on account of sickness. He has been Road Commissioner and Collector. Married Mary Taylor in 1848; she was born in Bradford Co., Penn., in 1827; his father died in 1846, aged 52 years; his mother died in 1872, aged 84 years. Attends the Congregational Church.

BARNABUS HINDS, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Winslow; born Oct. 4, 1823, in Eden, Lamoille Co., Vt.; in 1845, he came to Manchester, N. H.; in 1855, he returned to Eden, Vt.; in 1868, he came to Stephenson County; he owns about 62 acres of land; he is Justice of the Peace. He married Miss Matilda N. Buck in 1849; she was born in Coos Co., N. H.; they have had six children — Lelah M., now Mrs. Taylor; Adie M„ now Mrs. Fye; Eva M., Clara E., Andrew G. and Aldace S. Republicans in politics; attends the Christian Church.

EDWARD HUNT, Justice of the Peace and Notary, Winslow; born Aug. 13, 1812, in Norfolk Co., Mass.; in 1838, he came to Winslow; he followed the business of carriage and wagon making, till about 1859; he had formerly learned this trade in Massachusetts. He has served two or three years as Assistant Revenue Assessor, his commission being dated Sept. 30, 1863; has been about twenty-three years Township Clerk, and about fourteen years Township Assessor; five years Justice of the Peace. Married Maria Cox, Sept. 15, 1841; she was born in Oneida Co., N. Y., Aug. 6, 1817. Presbyterian in religion; Republican in politics.

GEORGE N. KENNEDY, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Winslow; born March 13, 1830, in Lorain Co., Ohio; in 1845, he came with his parents to Wisconsin; in 1847, he came to Stephenson County; he owns 149 acres of land; his father died in 1856, aged 52 years; his mother died June, 1878, aged 72 years; he has been School Director the past nineteen years; is Commissioner of Highways — has been for the past twenty-five years. Married Emily Barnes, Oct. 1, 1855; she was born, in 1836, in Munson, Ohio; died in 1856; had one child — Edward; second marriage to Elizabeth Wright, in 1857; she was born in Munson, Ohio; had six children, five living — Emily, George, Arthur, Stewart, Luella; lost Willie, aged three years; attends M. E. Church.

WILLIAM M. LINCOLN, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Winslow; born July 6, 1822, in Chenango Co., N. Y.; in 1845, he came to Stephenson County; he owns 340 acres of land, part he entered; has been School Director, etc. Married Mary J. Goss, in 1848; she was born in Chautauqua County, N. Y.; they have one child — Wilber E. Presbyterian in religion; Democrat in politics.

MRS. OLIVA MARBLE, daughter of E. H. Watkins, Sec. 26; P. O. Winslow; Hiram Marble was born October, 1813, in Vermont; in 1838, he came to Stephenson County; he died September, 1869; she owns 160 acres of land. They were married Sept. 6, 1833; she was born in Bradford Co., Pa.; her father still resides there; he is now in his 86th year; Mrs. Marble has just received a letter from her father, which is very plainly written; they had eleven children, eight living — four sons and four daughters; her sons Lyman and Ephraim served in the late war; Ephraim died in 1878, aged 44 years.

D. B. PACKER, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Winslow; born Nov. 29, 1801, in Haverhill, Essex Co., Mass.; in 1814, he came with his parents to Otsego Co., N. Y.; in 1828, he came to Lorain Co., Ohio; in 1845, he came to Stephenson Co., thence to Walworth Co., Wis.; kept a hotel here till 1847, when he removed to Kenosha, Wis.; in 1851, returned to Stephenson Co.; he owned and kept the hotel in Lena, which he exchanged for this farm of 160 acres; has been Poor Master four years, Justice of the Peace, etc. Married Miss Desire Lincoln, in 1824; she was born in Otsego Co., N. Y., in 1808; had six children, two living — Rebecca and George.

ROBERT PILSON, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Winslow; born July 12, 1816, in White Township, Indiana Co., Penn.; May 8, 1855, he came to Stephenson County, he owns 219 acres of land. He married Eliza J. Ross Nov. 30, 1846; she was born Nov. 9, 1821, in Indiana Co., Penn., and died May 11, 1872; they have four children — three sons and one daughter; his second marriage was to Mary M. Masser, March 12, 1877; she was born in Carbon Co., Penn.; they have one son. Republican in politics; Presbyterian in religion.

JEPTHA PROUTY, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Lena; born Oct. 14, 1814, in Bradford Co., Penn.; in 1850, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 280 acres of land in this county, also 320 acres in Iowa. He married Jane Wheeler in 1835; she was born in New York in 1817; they have ten children — seven sons and three daughters. Republican in politics.

THOMAS RODEBAUGH, retired, Winslow; born Dec. 30, 1824, in Centre Co., Penn.; in 1828, he came to Ohio, following the carpenter trade till 1845, when he came to Stephenson Co., and has continued at this business part of the time since; he owns the Winslow Hotel and two other residences in town; has been School Director. He married Lavina Ferguson in December, 1844; she was born in Wayne Co., Ohio, in December, 1824; they have six children — Mary Ann (now Mrs. Taylor), Elizabeth (now Mrs. Wilson), Lovina (now Mrs. Eels), Charles D., Melissa (now Mrs. Edwards) and Daniel T. They attend the M. E. Church; Democratic in politics.

DR. J. W. SAUCERMAN, physician and surgeon, Winslow; born Nov. 13, 1837, in Coshocton Co., Ohio; in 1844, he came to Green Co., Wis., with his parents; in 1863, he removed to Winslow; in 1859, he commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Carver, graduated at the Rush Medical College, Chicago, in January, 1863, and has been in constant practice since. He married Miss Luella Bradford in February, 1866; she was born in Winslow; they have three children — John M., Sarah C. and Mary B. He owns his residence in town and 150 acres of land in this county; also, 20 acres in Wisconsin. Presbyterian in religion.

CHARLES SHEARD, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Warren; born Nov. 21, 1805, in Yorkshire, England; in 1832, he came to New York; in about 1836, he removed to Canada, where he remained till 1849, when he came to Jo Daviess Co., Ill.; in 1858, he came to his present farm; he owns 210 acres of land. He married Eliza Thornton in 1838; she was born in Yorkshire, England; they have eight children, seven living — Joseph, Thomas, Henry, Allen, George A., John and James L.; Eli enlisted, in 1862, in Co. T, 31st W. V. I., and was killed in 1865; Joseph, Thomas and Henry also served in the late war.

WILLIAM SMITH, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Winslow; born Nov. 24, 1844, in Cattaraugus Co., N. Y.; when a boy he came to Stephenson Co., with his parents, where he has since lived; he owns 120 acres of land. Married Louisa Howe in 1868; she was born in 1847; have two children — Emily and Sarah; he enlisted, in 1861, in Co. G, 46th, I. V. I.; served to the end of the war; was in the battles of Shiloh, Tallahatchie, siege of Vicksburg, and others.

MRS. CELESTIA A. STAVER, wife of Jonathan M. Staver, deceased, Sec. 30; P. O. Winslow; he was born Sept. 21, 1834, in Centre Co., Pa.; in 1875 they came to Winslow Township; he died April 4, 1876. He was married March 24, 1861, to Miss Celestia A., daughter of Thomas Bowen; she was born in Michigan, Feb. 18, 1834; own 350 acres land; have six children — Oscar B., George B., Mary B., James M. B., Perry B. and Alma L. B.; lost, Jennie R. B., Dec. 26, 1879, aged 7 years; they had previously lived in Green Co., Wis., where Mr. S. held the offices of Justice of the Peace, County Superintendent, etc. Evangelical Church.

D. M. STAVER, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Nora; born May 10, 1849, in Clinton Co., Pa.; when a child he came with his parents to Stephenson Co.; in about 1856. they removed to Green Co., Wis.; in 1872, he returned to Stephenson Co.; he owns 215 acres of land. Married Christina Huver in 1868; she was born in Clinton Co., Penn.; they have three children — Elery H., Cora H. and Rosa H. Republican in politics.

THOMAS P. STEERE, farmer, and proprietor of cheese factory, Winslow; born Sept. 10, 1835, in Chenango Co., N. Y.; in 1844 he came with his parents to Winslow Township; he owns about 300 acres of land, also the cheese factory, which he built in 1875. Married Sarah Spafford, March 7, 1859; she was born in Otsego Co., N. Y.; they have seven children — Fred, Herbert, William, Mary, Martha, Sarah and Annis L. Attend Methodist Episcopal Church. Democrat in politics.

JAMES TURNBULL, general merchandise, Winslow; born May iJ, 1812, in Jedburg, Scotland; in 1833 he came to New York City; in 1834 he went to North Carolina, remained there till the fall of 1835, when he returned to New York; in 1837, he came to Chicago; engaged in the dry goods trade about one year; in 1838, he came to Stephenson Co.; followed farming till 1848, when he came to Winslow; he then carried on the cabinet trade till 1855, when he commenced his present business; he was elected President of the Freeport, Pecatonica Valley & State-Line R. R.; has been twice elected to this position. Married Sarah Kent in 1842; she was born in Hannibal, N. Y.; have two children — Christie M. and James A. Presbyterian in religion.

MRS. CATHARINE VAUGHN, Sec. 34; P. O. Winslow; she was born in Denmark, N. Y., April 21, 1820; she is a daughter of A. Fry. She was married to Orrin Vaughn, in 1838; he was born March 27, 1811, in New York; in 1848 they came to their present farm, consisting of 180 acres of land; he died April 15, 1860; have eight children — Rosina, Oscar O., Josephine, Adelbert, Charles, Wilber, Romelia and Eugenia; Oscar O. enlisted in 1863, in the 46th I. V. I., and served to the end of the war.

JOHN WALES, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Winslow; born Aug. 10, 1816, in Union Co., Penn.; in 1846 he came to Stephenson Co.; he first bought and improved a farm of 80 acres in West Point Township, now owned by A. Doll; he sold this farm in 1853; the following year he bought his present farm of 160 acres, which he has well improved; he has since sold about two acres of this land; he has been School Director and Treasurer for about thirty years. Married Catharine Romig, Nov. 15, 1838; she was born October, 1806, in Union Co., Penn.; they have one son — Alfred B., born May 2, 1844, in Union Co., Penn.; he married Rachel Armagost, March 15, 1863; she was born in Clarion Co., Penn.; they have six children — two sons and four daughters.

WADDAMS TOWNSHIP
MRS. LUCY AULT, proprietor of the Pennsylvania Hotel, McConnell's Grove; her husband. James Ault, was born Jan. 1, 1825. in Centre Co., Penn.; he died in November, in 1860. She came with her parents to Stephenson Co., in 1844; they were married in 1845; she was the daughter of George and Rebecca Lara, and was born Jan. 31, 1827; she owns 172 acres of land about this hotel property; have eight children — William, Ellen, Calvin, Frank, George, Laura, Jane and James; she has kept this hotel constantly for the past 25 years.

W. K. BECHTOLD, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born Aug. 31, 1852, in Lebanon Co., Penn.; in the spring of 1855 he came with his parents to Stephenson Co.; his father owns about 140 acres of land, which he manages. Married Miss Delilah Stutsman, in 1878; she was born in Elkhart Co., Ind.; they have one child — Lucinda E. His father, William Bechtold, was born Jan. 30, 1821, in Lebanon Co., Penn.; he was engaged at various pursuits before coming West, among which was milling, boating on the Schuylkill River, mason-work and burning lime; he sold from fifty to sixty thousand bushels a year; continued this about eleven years; he served seventeen years as Captain of the Pennsylvania Volunteers, as commander of the 2d Brigade, 5th Division; in the spring of 1855 he removed to this county; he has the finest garden and vineyard in the county; many of his grapes are imported; he owns a very desirable residence, built in 1871; it cost $3,000. He married Elizabeth Smelser, Oct. 18, 1841; she was born in Berks Co., Penn., Jan. 15, 1820; they have had seven children, six living — Samuel A., Mary M., Levi S., William K., Andrew S. and Linus Jr.; Aaron J., died Aug. 31, 1845, in his third year.

THOMAS BROWN, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born Jan. 26, 1823, in Centre Co., Penn.; in 1853 he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 80 acres of land. He married Miss Susanna England, in 1846; she was born in Centre Co., Penn.; they have one son — George L.; Thomas L. died in 1868, aged 17 years; lost two children in infancy. He is a Republican in politics.

L. B. CHURCHILL, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born Dec. 12, 1831, in Georgia, Franklin Co., Vt.; in 1841, he came with his parents to Franklin Co., N. Y.; in 1849, they removed to Freeport, Ill.; in 1867, he came to his present farm, consisting of 73 acres. Married Mary J. Hawkins, daughter of Thomas H. Hawkins, who came to this county in 1835; he died May 16, 1879; she was born in Pendleton Co., Ky., in 1833; they have five children — Herbert, William, Abbie, John and Frank. He enlisted in 1861 in the 12th I. V. L, Company B; served till April, 1862, and participated in the battles of Fort Donelson and Shiloh.

N. A. CLARK, farmer, Sec. 35; P.O. Lena; born June 23, 1852, in Waddams Township; in 1850, his parents came to this locality; his father died April 11, 1874, aged 58 years; he owns 172 acres of land. He married Miss Lydia Shoesmith in 1879; she was born in Kent Township.

J. C. CONATY, retired, McConnell's Grove; born in 1818, in Boston, Mass.; after completing his education, he secured a position with the Boston Water Works, under the supervision of Chief Engineer Thomas S. Williams; continued about three years; he was then appointed station agent of the Boston & Maine Railroad at Summerville, and held this position a short time; in 1856, he came to Stephenson County, and was employed by the Illinois Central Railroad Company to superintend getting out timber and having charge of their property at McConnell's Grove; he held this position till 1865; he then purchased the McConnell tract, consisting of 905 acres; he now owns about 300 acres of land, also a portion of the town plat, including the brick store and other town property. Married Mary Riley in 1842; she was born in Ireland; they had five children, three living — Mary A., now Mrs. Rogers; William and Charlotte; Elizabeth, died October, 1874, aged 22 years; Helen, died February, 1880, aged 28 years; his daughters all received a good education. Mrs. Rogers graduated in Chicago; during her course of studies, she lived with the family of the Hon. E. S. Chesborough; she taught the Grammar School in Lena during 1870; she and her sisters have taught school about eight years each.

JAMES COXON, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Damascus; born Aug. 15, 1809, in Derbyshire, England; in 1849, he came to Cincinnati; in 1850, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 91 acres of land. Married Ann Bacon April 5, 1842; she was born May 29, 1807, in Derbyshire, England; they had two children, one living — Elizabeth; lost Anna in 1850, aged 4 years. Attends M. E. Church, and Democrat in politics.

TRUMAN L. CROSS, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born Dec. 7, 1839, in Winslow Township; he owns 78 acres of land. He enlisted, in 1863, in the 67th I. V. I., Co. H; served four months. Married Miss Magdalene Jones in 1864; she was born in Buffalo, N. Y.; they have six children — Mary J., Emma A., Thomas G., John F., Helen S. and Luella.

MARTIN FOGEL, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born Aug. 30, 1817, in Philadelphia; when a child he came to Union Co., Penn., with his parents; in 1856, he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; he owns 120 acres of land, which he has improved. He married Mary Swatzlanderin 1845; she was born in 1828, in Union Co., Penn.; they have had eight children, seven living — Simon M., George H, Fannie E., Amanda C, Catharine E., Abraham F. and William J. C.;. Lucy B. died in 1858, aged 7 years; he has one daughter by a former marriage, Mary A.

HIRAM FULLER, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Lena; born March 2, 1816; in Otsego Co., N. Y.; in 1864, he came to his present farm; he owns 107? acres of land; he served twenty-eight days in the Patriot war of 1837-38. He married Miss Sarah Sophia Stoddard, June 10, 1841; she was born in Crawford Co., Penn., Nov. 1, 1822; they have five children — Fidelia S. (now Mrs. Redman), Daniel S., William R., Eva A. (now Mrs. Gates), and Hattie E. (now Mrs. Houser). Daniel S. enlisted in February, 1862, from Genesee Co., N. Y., in the heavy artillery, and served to the end of the war. Republican in politics.

J. B. GATES, farmer; Sec. 31; P. O. Damascus; born Oct. 19, 1808, in Hampshire Co., N. Y.; in 1836, he came to Winnebago Co., Ill.; in 1844, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 150 acres of land, which he entered and improved, He was married Jan. 31, 1832, to Miss Polly Rancier, daughter of Jabez and Betsey Fuller; she was born in New Lisbon, N. Y., Nov. 24, 1810; they had ten children, eight living — Austin H., Quincy A., Hiram J., Caroline E., Henry H., Emeline L., Norman J., Martin L.; they lost two children in infancy; his father, Daniel Gates, died in 1864,.aged 86 years.

HON. HUBBARD GRAVES, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Winslow; born Nov. 4, 1804, in Chenango Co., N. Y.; in 1810, he came with his parents to Scioto Co., Ohio; in 1834, he came to Putnam Co., Ill.; in 1835, he removed to Stephenson Co., where he has since resided; he owns 220 acres of land. In 1839, he was elected Sheriff, and served two years; he has been County Commissioner one year; he represented Carroll and Stephenson Counties in the Legislature during 1842-43; he has been Justice of the Peace about twenty years; has been Township Clerk; he collected the first taxes in this county, the amount collected being $96. He married Miss Cynthia Robey, in 1830: she was born in Scioto Co., Ohio, in 1811; they had eleven children, five living — Mary, Charles, Martha, Lora and Fannie. Republican in politics.

CHARLES GRAVES, general merchandise, McConnell's Grove; born Nov. 12, 1834, in Sangamon Co., Ill.; the following year he came with his parents to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; in 1874, he started a flour and feed store in Lena; carried on this business until 1877, when he came to McConnell's Grove. He married Mary Webster in 1860; she was born in New Hampshire; they have two children — Annettie and Myrtle.

SAMUEL W. GRISSINGER, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born Feb. 15, 1814, in York Co., Penn.; at about the age of 20 years he commenced to learn the carpenter's trade, and has followed this business about thirty years; in 1839, he came to Harrison Co., Ohio; in 1857, to Ogle Co., Ill.; the following year he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 108 acres of land. He married Margaret Bradley in 1837; she was born in York Co., Penn., in 1814; they had seven children; six are living — Rachel, Ann Eliza, William B., Frank, Mary and Thomas; lost one child in infancy. Frank enlisted, in 1862, in the 93d I. V. I.; served to the end of the war; William B. enlisted, in 1863, in the 46th I. V. I.; served to the end of the war.

CHARLES P. GUENTHER, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Lena; born Sept. 24, 1820, in Frankfort-on-the-Maine; in 1836, he came to Dutchess Co., N. Y.; in 1839, to Buffalo, N. Y.; in 1847, to Alleghany Co., Penn.; in 1853, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 100 acres of land; he is a minister of the German Baptist denomination; has been since 1859. He married Miss Mary Emmel in 1847; she was born in Germany; they have seven children — Emma, Eliza, Charles, Amelia, John, Mary and Samuel. Republican in politics.

J. L. HARTSOUGH, general merchandise, McConnell's Grove; born Aug. 23, 1840, in Indiana Co., Penn.; in 1857, he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; he worked at farming till October, 1867, when he came to McConnell's Grove and commenced his present business. He has been Township Superintendent; has been Justice of the Peace the .past twelve years; has been Township Clerk, and has held most of the township offices; he has also been a member of the Town Board for the past twelve years. He married Miss Mary Robey in 1867; she was born in Waddams Township; they have four children — Frank, Jennie, Lulu and Anna.

WILLIAM H. HOLMES, farmer, Sec. 31; P.O. Damascus; born May24, 1827, in Yorkshire, England; in 1851, he came to Middlesex Co., Conn.; in 1852, he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since resided; he owns 173 acres of land, and has improvements equal to any in the township, having built a good brick house and barn, and otherwise well improved. Married Rachel Whatmuff, May 2, 1855; she was born Dec. 6, 1826, in Yorkshire, England; they have five children — Anna Matilda, now Mrs. F. Gregsby; John A., George E., William H. and Joseph. Republican in politics; Methodist Episcopal in religion.

THOMAS JONAS, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born July 10, 1800, in Germany; in 1834, he came to Buffalo, N. Y.; in 1850, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 45 acres of land, improved with a good house, which cost $1,200, and a barn that cost $900. He married Saloma Rench in 1836; she was born in 1816, in Germany; they have ten children — four sons and six daughters; they lost one child in infancy.

B. KLECKLER, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born Nov. 4, 1820, in Baden, Germany; in 1844, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 212 acres of land, well improved, with good, substantial buildings, etc. Married Ocela Sicwalt, in 1844; she was born in France, in 1818; they have eight children — John P., Jacob, Fred, Henry, Michael, Mary, Louisa and Caroline; his son, John P., enlisted in 1862, in the 46th I. V. I., and served to the end of the war. Attends Lutheran Church.

WILLIAM KLECKNER, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Damascus; born Jan. 12, 1824, in Northampton Co., Penn.; in 1840, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 30 acres of land, with a comfortable house and barn. He enlisted in 1864, in Co. E, 146th I. V. I.; served to the end of the war. Married Mrs. Hostetter, in 1874; she was born in Cumberland Co., Penn.; had three children, two living — Mary and Alice; Mrs. K. has one child by a former marriage — Chressie.

ALONZO LUSK, farmer, Sec. 18; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born July 28, 1808, in Hartford Co., Conn.; at about the age of 13 years he came with his parents to Genesee Co., N. Y.; in 1831, he came to Cuyahoga Co., Ohio; in 1840, he came to Stephenson Co., Ill.; in the spring of 1850, he went back to Ohio, and in the fall returned here, where he has lived since; he owns 70 acres of land. Married Fidelia Stowel, in 1833; she was born in 1814, in New York; died in 1873; had eleven children, ten living — Charles, Frank, Mary, La Fayette, Emma, Edward and Edwin are twins, Lyman, Ida and Ella; lost Caroline in 1861, aged 23 years; Frank enlisted in 1861, and served to the end of the war.

G. W. LUTTS, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Lena; born July 4, 1826, in Lycoming Co., Penn.; in 1847, he came to Michigan; in 1849, he came to Stephenson Co., Ill.; in 1852, he went to California; in 1855, he returned to Stephenson Co.; in the spring of 1860, he went to Missouri; returned to this county the following year, where he has since lived; he owns 70 acres of land, with a good stone house and other improvements. Married Miss C. A. Galaher, in 1857; she was born in Indiana Co., Penn.; have four children — Catharine, William, Cora and George; lost Sarah in infancy. Republican in politics; attends M. E. Church.

NORMAN PHILLIPS, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Damascus; born Oct. 15, 1801, in Plainfield, N. Y.; in 1837, he came to Stephenson Co., and entered about 500 acres of land, and now owns about 420 acres; he has been Justice of the Peace, Township Superintendent, Assessor and School Director. His son, Parley A., enlisted February, 1865, in Co. G., 92d I. V. I., and served to the end of the war; was at the battle of Raleigh, N. C.; James M. enlisted in 1862, Co. G., 92d I. V. I.; served to the end of the war. Married Phebe A. Martin, Sept. 1, 1833; she was born July 16, 1808, in Martindale, N. Y.; died Oct. 29, 1843; have three children— Parley A., James M. and Ambrose S.; second marriage to Miss Desiah Hathaway, Sept. 1844; she was born in 1805, in Otsego Co., N. Y.; died in 1855; have one daughter — Mary.

JOHN PRICE, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born Sept. 10, 1815, in Centre Co., Penn.; in 1846 he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; he first bought 1 acre of land, and added to this 9 acres as soon as he could pay for it; he kept adding as his means would admit, and now owns 138 acres, well improved; he has a good house and barn, and other out-buildings. He married Sarah Bobb in 1838; she was born in 1818, in Union Co., Penn.; they have six children — Jeremiah, Catharine, James C., Elizabeth, Jonathan and William H.

JAMES PRICE, groceries and confectionery, and Postmaster, McConnell's Grove; born Feb. 4, 1832, in Mifflin Co., Penn.; in 1865 he came to Waddams Township; in 1876 he commenced his present business. He was appointed Postmaster in 1877; he has been Township Clerk five years. He married Miss Lydia Smith in 1856; she was born in Snyder Co., Penn.; they have five children — Sarah A., Adam A., Emma J., Martha E., Carrie S.; lost Henry H. in 1865, aged 5 years.

MICHAEL RIDLEBAUGH, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born Jan. 30, 1811, in Germany; in 1839 he came to Union Co., Penn.; in 1851 he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 51 acres of land. Married Elizabeth Arney in 1841; she was born in Union Co., Penn., Jan. 10, 1818; had five children, four living — Robert, Henry, Melinda and Amanda.

LEVI ROBEY, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. McConnell's Grove; he was born Oct. 22, 1807, in Scioto, Washington Township, Scioto Co., Ohio; Nov. 21, 1834, he came to Stephenson Co., and settled where he now lives; he is probably the earliest settler in the county living; he entered about half a section of land, and now owns 114 acres. He was the first Justice of the Peace in this county; was commissioned by Gov. Duncan previous to Jo Daviess and Stephenson Counties being divided; he was one of the commissioners appointed by the court to lay off” the townships in Stephenson Co.; he has served seven terms as County Supervisor, and was the first elected in Waddams Township; he has held about all the other minor offices in the township. He married Miss Almira Waite, Dec. 26, 1833; she was born in Cortland Co., N. Y., July 18, 1813; they have five children: William A., Louisa E., Cyrus A., Mary M. and Levi W.; Cyrus A. enlisted in 1862, in Co. D, 93d I. V. L; was wounded at the battle of Altoona, Ga., Nov. 6, 1864; is a Democrat in politics.

JACOB C. RUNKLE, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born Feb. 16, 1810, in Centre Co., Penn.; in 1857 he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 80 acres of land. He married Caroline Fye, in 1857; she was born in Centre Co., Penn.; they have seven children, four sons and three daughters; Democrat in politics; Presbyterian in religion.

DR. D. W. SCOTT, physician and surgeon, McConnell's Grove; born Nov. 21, 1833, in Geauga Co., Ohio; at about the age of 4 years, he came with his parents to Buena Vista, Ill.; in about 1858, he commenced the study of medicine; graduated in 1870, at the Eclectic Medical College, Cincinnati; in 1865, he commenced practicing in Green Co., Wis.; in 1870, he removed to Buena Vista, where he continued practicing till 1879, when he came to McConnell's Grove. Married Miss Urania Trotter in 1863; she was born in Stephenson Co.; they have two children — Minnie and Myron.

SANFORD S. SHERMAN, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born Aug. 8, 1830, in Essex Co., N. Y.; in 1849, he came to Knox Co., Ill.; in 1860, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 220 acres of land, with a good house, barn, and an orchard of about 200 trees, and other improvements. He married Miss Emma Lock in 1859; she was born in Essex Co., N. Y.; they have six children — Emma, Edrick, Lillie, John, Rosa and Raymond; lost three children in infancy. He and his daughters, Emma and Lillie, are members of the church of the United Brethren; Mrs. S. is a member of the M. E. Church.

WILLIAM SHIPPEE, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born Dec. 7, 1816, in Bergen Co., N. J.; in 1839, he came to Clearfield Co., Penn; in 1852, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 128 acres of land; he has been eight years Justice of the Peace. He was married March 30, 1856, to Mary, daughter of Samuel Bechtold; she was born in Clark Co., Ohio; she came to Stephenson Co. when a child, with her parents; they have eleven children — four sons and seven daughters; he has two children by a former marriage — John and Ira.

ROBERT SISSON, farmer. Sec. 23; P. O. Lena; born March 28, 1814, in Cambridgeshire, England; in 1843, he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since resided; he owns 225 acres of land. His brother, William, was born in June, 1812, and has been a resident of this county the past thirty-nine years; he entered this land from the Government, and has since lived here. He married Miss Mary A. Foreman in 1843; she was born in 1824, in Cambridgeshire, England; they have eleven children — William, Robert, Mary Ann, Ruth, Rebecca, Susan, Jane, Christopher, John P., Moses and Joshua; his son William enlisted, in 1862, in Co. G, 92d I. V. I., and served to the end of the war; his eyesight is very much injured from exposure when in the service.

A. F. STAMM, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born Feb. 7, 1840, in Centre Co., Penn.; in 1855, he came with his parents to Michigan; in 1856, they came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 93 acres of land, which he has improved; in 1877, he built a very substantial barn, 32x50, which cost about $1,000. He married Miss Leah Stamm in November, 1866; she was born in Centre Co., Penn.; his father died April 13, 1871, in his 63d year.

J. M. STAMM, general merchandise, McConnell's Grove; born May 27, 1852, in Huntington Co., Penn.; when he was 3 years of age he came with his parents to Waddams Township: he was engaged in farming till 1874, when he was employed as clerk for McNutt & Shippy; continued with this firm till 1877, when he commenced his present business; he has been Township Clerk. He married Elizabeth Masters, July, 1879; she was born in Maryland.

ANDREW ST. JOHN, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Buena Vista; born Sept, 11, 1807, in St. Clair Co., Ill.; in 1825 he came with his parents to Sangamon Co.; in 1827 he went to Galena and engaged in mining; in 1830 he returned to Sangamon Co.; in 1836 he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; he owns 228 acres of land. He married Catharine Chilton, April 23, 1830; she was born in Madison Co., Ill., Feb. 27, 1811; died May 24, 1880; they had six children, four living— William A., Armenda F. (now Mrs. Bobb), Jane S. (now Mrs. Soladay), and Sarah (now Mrs. Sheckler); Thomas enlisted August, 1862; died at Camp Douglas, Chicago, October, 1862; lost Mary, aged 17 years.

JEREMIAH SWART, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Lena; he was born March 21, 1849, in Waddams Township; his father, Isaac D. G. Swart, was born May, 1812, in New York; about 1844 he came to this locality; he died Sept. 14, 1878; owns 253 acres of land. He was married, in 1848, to Mrs. Orpha Allen; she was born in Canada, in 1822; they have three children — Jeremiah, Amelia and Susan; she has three children by a former marriage — Torrence, Polly and Roxie.

HENRY WOHLFORD, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Orangeville; born Dec. 9, 1811, in Center Co., Penn.; in 1842 he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; he learned the tanner's trade in Pennsylvania, and worked at this business till he came to this county; he owns 136 acres of land, which he entered and improved. He married Catharine Worneldorf, in 1835; she was born in 1815; they have ten children — four sons and six daughters.

All sales go to help support this website.

Remarkable Stories, Volume 1
by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a Licensed Massage Therapist and Life Coach. An amateur historian, parts of these stories and many more appear on his website, www.robertbike.com.

Buy now! Only 99 cents to download in .pdf format!

Want a paperback? List price $14.99, now only $11.99!

 

FLORENCE TOWNSHIP

JOHN Q. ADAMS
, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Florence Station; born July 12, 1831, in Orleans Co., Vt.; in March, 1851, he came to Stephenson Co.; he followed the carpenter's trade about two years; he then went to California; returned in 1858; has since been engaged in farming; he owns 240 acres of land; has been Township Superintendent during 1873-74, and has held about all the township offices; his brothers, Newell H., Abel P., James C. and Orin J., served in the late war. Married Julia Van Brocklin in 1858; she was born in Lewis Co., N. Y.; have eight children — Morris, Hattie, Oscar C. A., Eva A., Lincoln, Florence J., Clara and William A. Republican in politics.

JOHN ASPINWALL, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Freeport; born July 21, 1817, in Saratoga Co., N. Y.; in 1817, he removed with his parents to Chautauqua Co., N. Y.; in 1845, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 225 acres of land, part he entered; he owns a substantial stone house, three barns and other improvements. Married Lucy Shumway, March 1, 1835; she was born in Jefferson Co., N. Y., May, 1813; have seven children — Henry, John, Sterne, Homer, Milo (now a dentist and a resident of Chicago), Arvilla and Lucy A.; Junius died Oct. 21, 1874, aged 20 years. Republican in politics.

MRS. PATRICK BARRON, Sec. 32; P. O. Shannon; her husband, Mr. Barron, was born November, 1829, in Ireland; in 1849, he came with his father to Stephenson Co.; he died, January, 1876. He married Margaret Molton, Jan. 17, 1859; he was born in Ireland, May 20, 1839; have five children —William, John, Emily, Kate and Clara; she owns 370 acres of land.

MICHAEL. BASTIAN, farmer, Sec 33; Florence Station; born in Alsace, France, May 27, 1827; in 1858, he came to Stephenson Co.; he first bought 80 acres, which he improved, then he added to this 70 acres; now owns 150 acres; he first built a frame house, which was burned; he now owns a good brick house, which cost about $1,600, and barn, 36x56, cost $900, and other good improvements. Married Miss Katie Mallo, in 1858; she was born in Alsace; they had five children, four living — Katie, Michael, John and Ellen; lost Mary in infancy.

ANDREW BLACK, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Freeport; born March 1, 1834, in Ireland; in 1852, he came to Vermont; in 1854, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 160 acres of land; has been School-Director. Married Ellen May, March 11, 1858; she was born in Vermont; had seven children, four living — Harvey W., Eddie N.; William Irvin, and Ettie A., whom they adopted.

JOHN BURCKHARDT, farmer; P. O. Florence Station; born Nov. 14, 1844, in Baden; when he was 4 years old, he came, with his parents, to Silver Creek Township; he enlisted, December, 1863, in Co. C, 46th I. V. I.; served two years; in 1866, he came to his present farm, consisting of 160 acres of land; this farm he has improved with a good brick house, cost about $2,300; a barn, 40x72, cost $1,800, and other improvements. Married Albertina Waetzke in 1866; she was born in Germany; they have eight children — William H., Anna M., Alfred J., Charles F., Henry, Elizabeth A., Margaret A., and an infant not named.

ABRAHAM DIEHL, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Florence Station; born March 24, 1835, in Albany, N. Y.; in 1837, he came, with his parents, to Hancock Co., Ohio; here he worked at the carpenter's trade about ten years; he enlisted in 1861 in Co. E., 49th O. V. I., and served-three years; participated in the battles of Shiloh & Stone River, Perryville, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, capture of Atlanta, and others; in 1870 he came to Ogle Co.; in 1872 he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 80 acres of land. Married Elizabeth Leonard in 1864; she was born in Gallia Co., Ohio; they have four children — Stephen A., Ida R., Anna Belle C. and Charles E. United Brethren in religion; Republican in politics.

T. L. EARLY, farmer, Sec 19; P. Freeport; born April 23, 1813, in Whitley Co., Ky.; in 1837, he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; he owns 125 acres of land, part he entered. Married Sarah Faris in 1844; she was born in Knox Co., Ky., in 1830; they have three children— John F., William H. and Mary E. Republican in politics.

ELI ELLIS, farmer, Sec 19; P. O. Freeport; born April 2, 1839, in Green Co., N. Y.; in 1844, he came with his parents to Stephenson Co.; he owns 131 acres of land, which was entered by his father. Has been School Director, Commissioner of Highway, Township Superintendent, Collector, and has held about all the township offices. He enlisted in 1864, Co. A, 46th I. V. I.; served to the end of the war; participated in the battles of Spanish Fort, Blakely and others. His father died in March, 1878, aged 61 years. Married Lucy Mabie, March 1866; she was born in New York; they have one child — Henry C. Republican in politics.

AUGUST FRONING, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Freeport; he was born in 1830 in Prussia; in 1857, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 280 acres of land; is Township Treasurer. Married Margaret Bowhen in 1854; she was born in Prussia; they have seven children — John, Katie, Henry, Herman, Lizzie, August and Douglas.

GEORGE HAMM, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Florence Station; born Dec. 24, 1831, in Alsace, Germany; in 1851, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 143 acres of land; has been twelve years School Director His brother Valentine enlisted in 1864; served about eight months; was discharged on account of sickness. Married Elizabeth Garman in 1860; she was born in Lebanon Co., Pa.; they have ten children — five sons and five daughters.

AUGUST HOEFER, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Florence Station; born Nov. 8, 1838, io Prussia; in 1856, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 120 acres of land. He is Township Clerk and School Director. Married Miss Mena Petermeier in 1866; she was born in Prussia.

JOHN HOLLER, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Freeport; born June 15, 1842, in Erie Co., N. Y.; in 1859, he came with his parents to Stephenson Co.; he owns 200 acres of land. Has been School Director the past six years. Married Mary Mowrer in 1869; she was born in Canada; have four children — John, George, Charles and William.

JACOB HOFFMANN, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Florence Station; born April 23, 1826, in Baden; in 1853, he came to Stephenson Co.; in 1864, he came to his present farm; he owns 140 acres of land. He married Barbara Heilman, in 1853; she was born in Baden; they have seven children — five living — Lizzie, Mary, John, Louis and Katie.

CHRISTOFER MAYER, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Freeport;_ born Sept. 4, 1823, in Wurtemberg, Germany; in 1845 he came to Ogle Co., Ill.; in 1854 he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 205 acres of land. Married Margaret Baecher in 1849; she was born in Germany in January, 1823; they have eight children — Louisa, Amelia, Mary, Rebecca, Samuel, Rosa, Louis and Laura.

JOSEPH MEYER, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Freeport; born March 1, 1822, in Germany; in 1852 he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 160 acres of land. Married Kate Alert in 1855; she was born in Germany; they have three children — John, Joseph and Lizzie.

GEORGE A. MOORE, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Freeport; born Jan. 2, 1817, in Berks Co., Pa.; when about 10 years old, he came, with his parents, to Lycoming Co.; in 1850 he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; he owns 160 acres of land. Married Christina Cole in 1839; she was born in 1820, in Berks Co., Pa.; they have eleven children — Mary, Catharine, Delia J., George W., David, William W., Isaac, Franklin, Elias, Charles H. and Ira Lincoln; George W. enlisted in 1862 in the 46th I. V. I., and served to the end of the war. Free Methodist in religion; Republican in politics.

SIMON PETERMEIER, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Florence Station; born Jan. 12, 1846, in Germany; in 1860, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 240 acres of land; his brother Fred enlisted in 1862, 92d I. V. I., served three years. Married Amelia Schroadermier, March, 1871; she was born in Stephenson Co.; they have four children — Limon, Edward, Lydia and Henry.

JACOB PFIEL, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Freeport; born Sept. 18, 1827, in Germany; in 1843, he came to Milwaukee; first worked on a farm, then worked at the carpenter trade about two years; in 1851, he removed to Washington Co., there started a store; in about eighteen months he sold out his store and bought 100 acres of land and built a brewery; he carried on this business about five years; he then sold out the brewery and continued farming till 1868, when he sold his farm and removed to Stephenson Co.; he now owns 185 acres of land. Married Angeline Everly, in 1852; she was born in Ohio; they have six children — Henry, Elizabeth, Frances, Mena, Edward and Jacob William. Democrat in politics.

J. H. PIERCE, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Freeport; born Sept. 13, 1830, in Clarion Co., Pa.; in about 1842, he came to Trumbull Co., Ohio; here he was apprenticed to learn the carriage trade; worked at this business about seven years; in 1854, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 240 acres of land, well improved, with three good barns and other improvements. He is Superintendent of the township, has held this office four years. Married Miss Mary J. McKee, in 1862; she was born in Crawford Co., Penn.

EDWIN SCOVILL, farmer, Sec. 18; P. O. Freeport; born Sept. 22, 1846, in Florence Township; his father came to this county in about 1837, and died December, 1876, aged 59 years; he owns 202 acres of land. He has been Township Treasurer. He married Julia Roberts, Jan. 4, 1872; she was born in Ogle Co.; they have three children — Phebe, James and Elnora.

NATHAN SHEETZ, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Freeport; born June 21, 1811, in Berks Co., Penn.; May 28, 1837, he came to Stephenson Co.; he remained here till March 17, 1850, when he went to California; he left California Nov. 25, 1850, sailing by the way of Cape Horn; arrived here March 14, 1851, where he has since lived; he owns 165 acres of land, part entered. He married Sophia Hiser, in 1834; she was born in Union Co., Penn., in 1812; died in 1836; had three children, one living — William. His second marriage, to Catharine Martin, occurred in 1844; she was born in 1819, in Germany; died July 22, 1872;they had seven children, six living — George W., Sarah E., Robert V., Harris, Cyrus L. and Daniel M. His third marriage was to Mrs. Sturner, on June 17, 1875; she was born in Virginia; Democrat in politics.

GILES TURNEAURE, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Freeport; born June 18, 1829, in Genesee Co., N. Y.; in 1833 he came with his parents to Crawford Co., Penn.; in 1843 they came to Boone Co., Ill.; in 1850 they removed to Stephenson Co.; he owns 80 acres of land; is Justice of the Peace; his brothers, Jacob M., George B. and William H., served in the late war. He married Sophronia C. May, Jan. 10, 1855;. she was born in Vermont; they have three children — Effie S., Florence and Fred E. Baptist in religion; Republican in politics.

CONRAD VAN BROCKLIN, Sec. 17; P. O. Freeport; he was born Feb. 21, 1802, in Montgomery Co., N. Y.; he died Nov. 3, 1877; in the fall of 1835 he came to Kendall Co., Ill.; the following spring he removed to Stephenson Co., where he remained till the time of his death; he had been School Treasurer about twenty years, and had held about all the township offices; they own 380 acres of land, which he entered. He married Harriet Searl, Jan. 1, 1832; she was born in South Hampton, Mass., Dec. 13, 1803; they had eight children, six living — Julia, Phebe C, Lucy A., Sarah M., James M. and Henry O.; Marcellus died Nov. 12, 1832, aged 2 months; William A. died Oct. 2, 1873, aged 36 years.

WILHELM WILHELMS, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Florence Station; born in 1840, in Germany; in 185tJ he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 240 acres of land; has been School Director. Married Henrica De Groot in 1865; she was born in Germany; they have five children — Christopher, Henry, Oltman, Christian and William.

DARIUS WINTERS, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Freeport; born Feb. 20, 1838, in Kingston, Delaware Co., Ohio; in 1847, he came with his parents to Winnebago Co., Ill.; in 1850, they removed to their present farm; he owns 98 acres of land; his father died in 1879, aged 76 years. Married Mary J. Cronkrite in 1868; she was born in Saratoga Co., N. Y.; have one child, Hattie E.; he enlisted in 1862, Co. A, 46th I. V. I.; served to the end of the war; participated in the following engagements: Siege of Vicksburg (here he was taken prisoner — afterward paroled), Spanish Fort, Blakeley, Mobile and others.

DR. CHARLES B. WRIGHT, physician and surgeon, Sec. 17; P. O. Freeport; born July 4, 1820, in Green Co., N. Y.; at about the age of 21, he commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Huyck, at Stevensville, Albany Co., N. Y.; graduated at the Albany Medical College in 1849; in 1855, he came to Stephenson Co. In 1863, he was elected County Judge, to fill a vacancy; on the expiration of this term, he was re-elected, and held this position four years; he was commissioned Surgeon, in 1861, in Fremont Body Guard; held this position till the removal of Fremont; he he has been Postmaster at Loran, and held other minor offices. Married Miss Augusta M. Shepard, daughter of Dr. Shepard, in 1840; she was born in Green Co., N. Y.; they have one daughter, Angelia A., now Mrs. William A. Van Brocklin. Republican in politics.

All sales go to help support this website.

Remarkable Stories, Volume 1
by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a Licensed Massage Therapist and Life Coach. An amateur historian, parts of these stories and many more appear on his website, www.robertbike.com.

Buy now! Only 99 cents to download in .pdf format!

Want a paperback? List price $14.99, now only $11.99!

 

SILVER CREEK TOWNSHIP

MICHAEL BANGASSER, farmer, and proprietor Stephenson County Creamery, Sec. 17; P. O. Freeport; born April 2, 1819, in Alsace, France; in 1835, he came to Buffalo, N. Y., worked at the ship-carpenter's trade there about three years; in 18J0, came to Chicago, thence to Ogle Co.; in 1843, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 232 acres of land; he entered 40 acres; the balance of this land cost from $20 to $30 per acre; he owns the only creamery in this county, and his entire time is devoted to this business; his sons manage the farm; he has been School Director about eighteen years. Married Mary Stable, May 16, 1843; she was born in Alsace; they have eight children — Cornelia, Elizabeth, Frank, Mathias, Kate, Michael, Fred and Ellen.

JOHN BARDEL, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Freeport; born Aug. 19, 1816, in Alsace, France; in 1834. he came to Canada, and at that time he was in debt $15; he then commenced working on a farm, and in 1839, he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; he now owns about 500 acres of land and a store on Stephenson street, No. 81, and this large property he has accumulated since coming here. Married Philipena Gross in 1850; she was born in Prussia in 1824; they have three children, two living — Phillip and Margaret J., now Mrs. Kakelhoffer; lost John in 1872, aged 22 years.

CHRISTOPHER BENNETT, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Baileyville; born Jan. 28, 1819, in Cornwall, England; when a boy he commenced working in the copper mines, and continued in this business till 1842, when he came to Galena, Ill.; there he engaged in mining; about 1845, he came to Stephenson Co., and entered his land, which he owns, now consisting of 237 acres; in about 1850, he went to California; returned the following year, where he has lived since. Married Mary Emmons in 1852; she was born in Ohio; they had fourteen children, eleven living, five sons and six daughters.

FRED BROCKMAIER, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Baileyville; born Nov. 19, 1824, in Germany; in 1848, he came, with, his parents, to Ogle Co.; in 1867 he came to his present locality; he has been one of the most successful, and is now the largest farmer in this township; he owns 1,078 acres of land in this township, also 18 acres in Ogle Co.; his farm is well provided with good and substantial buildings; his house cost about $3,000, his barn $3,500, and granary about $1,000; this large property he has accumulated since coming here. Married Angeline Borchers in 1854: she was born in Germany in 1833; they have six children — Fred L., Deborah, Henry W., John F., Elizabeth and Angeline.

WILLIAM BROKHAUSEN, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Freeport; born July 8, 1825, in Germany; his father being a weaver, he learned this trade and worked at it about three years; in 1848, he came to Chicago; when he landed here he was not worth a dollar; he then went to Elgin and worked on a farm; in 1851 he returned to Chicago and commenced to learn the distilling business; he followed this about sixteen years; he then came to Stephenson Co., and has since been engaged in farming; he now owns about 500 acres of land, with large improvements. Married Hermena Korf, in 1854; she was born in 1831, in Germauy; they have ten children — Flora, Dora, Edward, Fred, Louisa, Mena, Emma, Charles, Benjamin and George.

J. J. BURCKHARDT, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Freeport; born April 14, 1846, in Baden; in 1847, he came, with his parents, to Silver Creek Township, where he has since lived; he owns 145 acres of land. Married Bertha Watcke, in 1873; she was born in Wisconsin.

HENRY C. BROWN, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Freeport; born Nov. 22, 1827, in Joliet, Ill.; in the spring of 1836, he came, with his parents, to his present locality; he is the earliest settler in this township; he owns 95 acres of land, entered by his mother. He married Lavina Gregory, in 1849; she was born in Nashville, Tenn.; they have eight children — Cordelia, Jesse, Elizabeth, Charles, George, Frank. William and Nellie.

A. H. COLBY, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Freeport; born Sept. 3, 1842, in Rochester, N. Y.; when a child, he came, with his parents, to Ashtabula Co., Ohio; in 1850 they came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 80 acres of land, valued at $5,000, deeded to him by his father, with these remarks: “You have always been honest, upright and faithful in all your dealings with me, and have never told me a falsehood or deceived me in any manner whatever, and, as a mark of appreciation, I deed you this property.” He has been eight years Director and Clerk of the School Board, and is Justice of the Peace. He enlisted in 1862 in Co. F, 92d I. V. I., and served to the end of the war; a part of this time he was Clerk in the Provost Marshal's office at Chicago. Married Miss Ella Kendall, in 1877; she was born in Harlem Township; they have one son; he has also a son by a former marriage — Emery B.

GEORGE B. DIDDENS, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Freeport; born Dec. 26, 1855, in Silver Creek Township; his father died in 1865, aged 61 years; his mother lives with her son on this farm; she was born in 1813. He is School Director. He owns 160 acres of land.

LLOYD G. DRAKE, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Freeport; born Bee. 19, 1818, in Tioga Co., N. Y.; in 1857, he came to Belvidere, Ill.; April, 1859, he removed to Stephenson Co.; Mrs. D. owns 186 acres of land. He married Mrs. Stebbins in 1859; she was born in Madison Co., N. Y., April 10, 1819; came to Stephenson Co. in 1840; she has three children by a former marriage — Charles J., Anna A., now Mrs. Freeman, and Frances R., now Mrs. Shirk.

HENRY DUBBERT, farmer, See. 33; P. O. Baileyville; born March 27, 1826, in Germany; in 1848, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 160 acres of land, well improved, has a very fine house, cost about $2,000, and other improvements, he also owns 92 acres in Ogle Co.; he has been School Director the past fifteen years. Married Mena Rennaberg, March 2, 1855; she was born in Germany; they have ten children — four sons and six daughters.

WILLIAM EATON, farmer, Sec. 18; P. O. Freeport; born June 29, 1806, in Otsego Co., N. Y.; in 1841 he came to Carroll Co., and about ten years later he came to his present farm; he owns 80 acres land. Married Emiline Wilcox, in 1828; she was born in Chenango Co., N. Y.. in 1808; died in 1851; have four children — Nelson, W. H., Melissa and Clara. His present wife was formerly Mrs. Wheat; she has three children by a former marriage.

HENRY EDER, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Freeport; born Jan. 22, 1844, in Baden; in 1847, he came with his parents to Silver Creek Township; he now owns 136 acres land, with the homestead; he enlisted in 64th Co. B, 8th I. V. I.; served to the end of the war. Married Margaret Richter, in 1867; she was born in Germany, in 1844; died in 1877; have two children — John and Jacob. Second marriage to Christina Schlampp, Jan. 1, 1879; she was born in Baden; they have one child — William.

ANDREW FIEST, farmer, Sec. 18; P. O. Freeport; born Dec. 2, 1825, in Germany; in 1853, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 322 acres of land. He married Magdeline Hooup in 1860; she was born in Germany; they have seven children — Josephine, Sophia, William, Mary, Joseph, John and Theressa.

JOHN FOSHA, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Baileyville; born Jan. 12, 1833, in Germany; in 1835, he came to Maryland with his parents, in 1838, to Virginia, and in 1847, to Ogle Co.; in 1860, he came to his present farm, consisting of 320 acres, and 40 acres in Ogle Co., also 638 acres in Kansas. He married Minna Schuenman in 1855; she was born in Hanover; they have eight children — four sons and four daughters.

JOHANN FULS, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Freeport; born Jan. 14, 1800, in Germany; in 1853, he came to Stephenson Co.; he and his sons own 320 acres of land. He married Fannie Albers in 1826; she was born in May, 1801, in Germany; they have five children — Sleffentje, Dirk, Tjke, Albert and Swantje.

S. M. GRIER, farmer, Sec. 18; P. O. Freeport; born Aug. 6, 1817, in Lycoming Co., Penn.; in 1865, he came to his present farm, consisting of 253 acres of land. He married Miss F. O. Stewart in 1840; she was born June, 1815, in Lycoming Co., Penn.; they have five children-Stewart, Alexander and James (twins), Mary A. and William; John H. enlisted in the 5th Penn. Beserve, and was killed at Gaines Hill, June, 1863. A daughter, Mrs. Mabley, died in 1879, aged 24 years.

JACOB HERRMANN, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. Freeport; born June 13, 1827, in Baden; in 1852, he came to Stephenson Co.; he first worked for the railroad company at $1 per day; he now owns 260 acres of land, with a good brick house and barn and other improvements. He married Miss M. Both, in 1859; she was born in Baden; they had three children, one living — Charles.

JOHN J. HEWITT, banker, residence Sec. 6; Freeport; born Feb. 15, 1828, in Franklin Co. Penn.; at about the age ofl 5 years he came West; in about 1854, he settled in Ogle Co., where he resided till 1877, when he came to his present residence; he is proprietor and owner of the Farmers and Traders Bank, Foreston, Ogle Co.; he also owns the largest elevator there, and has been engaged there in merchandising about twenty-five years. He owns about 1,500 acres improved land in Carroll, Ogle and Stephenson Counties, also about 6,000 acres in Iowa. Married Susan M. Emerick in 1858; she was born in 1831, in Franklin Co. Penn.; died in 1862; have two children — Grace, now Mrs. Bosensteil, and Theodore; lost Benjamin E. in 1879, aged 21 years. Second marriage, to Martha E. Hutchinson, Dec. 1872; she was born in Penn.; have two children — Beulah and Ethel. Republican in politics.

JACOB HOEBEL, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Freeport; born Sept. 29, 1821, in Germany. In about 1844 he came, with his father, to Logansport, Ind.; thence to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived. He worked for his father about fifteen years; and since this time he has accumulated his present property, consisting of 160 acres of land, improved, with a good house, built in 1879, cost about $1,500: his barn cost about $600, and other good improvements; has been School Director. Married Elizabeth Weiogart in 1847; she was born in Germany in 1828 they have six children — John, Jacob, Katharine, George, Louis and Mary.

M. W. HOLLINGSWORTH, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Freeport; born Feb. 7, 1817, in Hartford, Md.; there he learned the carpenter's trade; worked at it about twenty years; in 1836 he came to Galena; thence to Savannah; in 1839 he came to Carroll Co., where he made and improved four farms; in 1865, he came to his present farm. He owns 191 acres of land; has been School Director, Township Superintendent, and Commissioner, in Carroll Co. Married Ophelia Foote in 1840; she was born in Chittenden Co., Vt.; have five children — Mary, Hiram, Ellen, Charles and Alice.

ALEX JOHNSTON, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Freeport; born Dec. 8, 1836, near Glasgow, Scotland; when a child he came, with his parents, to Berks Co., Penn.; was employed by Atkins Bros, as traveling agent and prospecting, opening mines, etc.; he held this position till 1878, when he came to his present farm, consisting of 73 acres of land. Married Emma Ramsey in 1868; she was born in Lancaster Co., Penn.; they have three children — James T., Ivie and Elsie.

JOSEPH KACHELHOFFER, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Freeport; born Nov. 19, 1846, in Buffalo N. Y.; in 1852 he came, with his parents, to Stephenson Co.; his father died July 2, 1880; he had been one of the most successful business men in this township, acquiring a property, which he owned at the time of his death, of 828 acres of improved land in this township, also 400 acres in Iowa; on coming to this county he first engaged in the brewing business, and carried on a wagon and blacksmith shop; this he sold out, and engaged in farming. His mother died in 1876, aged 60 years and 4 months. He married Mary M. Able in 1875; she was born in Buffalo N. Y., in 1851; they have four children — John W., Emma R., Charles J. and Edward L.

C. M. KNAPP, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Baileyville; born Aug. 9, 1812, in Luzerne Co., Pa.; in 1857, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 170 acres of land. Married Amy Cole in 1835; she was born in Bradford Co., Pa.. Oct. 2, 1807; they had three children, two living — Samuel H. and Laura (now Mrs. Carpenter). Charles M. enlisted in 1862, in the 92d I. V. I.; died, Jan., 1864, from a wound received when riding a horse. Samuel H. enlisted in 1863, in the 61st I. V. I.; was discharged on account of sickness.

F. P. KOEHLER, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Freeport; born May 18, 1817, in Bavaria; he followed butchering till 1833, when he came to Seneca Co., Ohio, and continued the butcher business in Tiffin, Ohio; in 1837, he came to Ft. Wayne, Ind.; in 1839, to Joliet, Ill.; in 1841, he came to Freeport and commenced the livery and butcher business; carried on this till 1849; he then opened a hotel, run it till 1853, then returned to butchering; continued in this business till 1863, when he came to his present farm; he owns 130 acres of land, also property in Freeport. Married Margaret Boyer in 1844; she was born in 1826, in Bavaria; they have eight children — Fred, Jacob B., Herman L., Louisa, Hannah, Albert D., William H. and Edward H.; lost three children in infancy.

HENRY KRUSE, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Baileyville; born March 9, 1827, in Ostsfriesland, Germany; in 1853, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 280 acres of land, improved, with a fine brick house, built in 1876, cost, S3, 200, and other fine improvements. Married Miss Tjakemiua Collmann in 1855; she was born in Ostsfriesland, Germany, in 1831; they have six children — Elina, Sarah D., Tebbo, William, Emma and Nettie.

BERNHARD LAMM, farmer, Sec. 18; P. O. Freeport; born July 28, 1835, in Baden, Germany; in 1854, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 100 acres of land; he learned the trade of wagon-making, and has worked at his business about twenty years; has been Township Assessor. Married Theresa Lamm in 1871; she was born in Stephenson Co.; they have four children — Verika, Julia, Helena and Ida.

JOSEPH LAMM, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Freeport; bom May 12, 1835, in Erie Co., Buffalo, N. Y.; in about 1837, he came with his parents to Stephenson Co.; soon after coining, his father purchased several yoke of oxen and engaged in teaming; he hauled grain from Dubuque, Galena and Freeport, to Chicago, bringing merchandise in return; he and his brother Godfrey assisted their father at this business; their usual load was about 100 bushels, driving from five to six yoke of oxen; the time occupied would be from ten days to three weeks; his father died December, 1879, aged 77 years; he owns 160 acres of land, well-improved, also a steam thrashing machine, which cost about $1, 400, the first in the township, his business being farming and thrashing. He married Louisa Dilly in 1857; she was born in Germany; have six children — George, John Theresa, Amelia, Augusta and Albert.

AARON LONG, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Freeport; born July 10, 1845, in Dauphin Co., Penn.; in 1849, he came with his parents, to Stephenson Co.; he owns 120 acres of land; has been School Director. His father died Sept. 21, 1874, aged 56 years. Married Miss F. Kuenneth, Jan. 1, 1871; she was born in Germany; they have four children — A. E., Mary A., Frances R. and Emma C.

NATHANIEL LONG, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Freeport; born Jan. 12, 1849, in Dauphin Co., Penn.; when an infant, he came with his parents to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived. His father died Sept. 18, 1874, aged 57 years; they own 180 acres of land. Married Mary A. Ambrewster, March 30, 1880; she was born in Canada.

J. S. REISINGER, farmer, Superintendent of County Poor Farm, Sec. 7; P. O. Freeport; born Feb. 20, 1836, in Trumbull Co., Ohio; in 1855, he came West, with his parents, and has since lived in Carroll, Ogle and Stephenson Cos. He was elected to his present position in 1876. Married Rebecca Hulse, in 1858; she was born in Trumbull Co., Ohio; they had seven children; four are living — Clara A., Lizzie E., Sarah A. and Lydia A. Republican in politics.

JACOB RICE, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Freeport; born March 23, 1819, in Indiana Co., Penn.; in 1845, he came to Galena, thence to Wisconsin; in 1851, he came to Freeport, where he has lived till 1876, when he removed to his present farm; he learned the carpenter's trade, and has worked at it about forty years; he owns 40 acres of land. Married Mary Walton in 1853; she was born in Ohio; they have four children — Ida, Adella, John and Theressa; he has one son by a former marriage — Charles E.

CHARLES SCHOETTLE, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Freeport; born Oct. 6, 1807 in Baden, Germany; June, 1833, he came to New York City and carried on the tailoring trade there about ten years; he then removed to Rensselaer Co., N. Y.; carried on tailoring till 1852, when he came to Freeport; here he carried on this business till 1854, when he came to his present farm; he owns 170 acres of land, well improved. Married Catharine Butz, October, 1833; she was born in Baden, March, 1813; they have eight children — Catharine, Mary A., Emeline, Charles, Josephine, Frank A., Antoinette and Theo.

S. J. STEBBINS, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Freeport; born Sept. 21, 1813, in Lebanon, Madison Co, N. Y.; in 1836, he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; he is one of the oldest settlers in this township; he owns 354 acres of land, which he entered; he has held about all the township offices. Married Jane Stearns, in 1838; she was born in St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., July 22, 1817; they had seven children, four living — Abbie, Adelbert, Homer F. and Warren; Joel died Sept. 28, 1863, aged 23 years; Emma J. died Oct. 7, 1863, aged 15 years, and James H. died in September, 1876, aged 21 years.

NICHOLAS STEFFEN, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Freeport; born March 10, 1836, in Prussia; in 1840. he came with his parents to Chicago; his father started a store here; he assisted in the store till about the age of 14, when he commenced to learn the printer's trade; he worked at it about three years; in 1853, he came to Freeport and commenced manufacturing cigars; this he continued till 1872, when he came to this locality; he works 220 acres of land, owned by his father-in-law's estate. Married Magdalena Kachelhoffer, in 1859; she was born in Buffalo, N. Y.; they have ten children — Nicholas M., Augustus, Eleanor, Emma, Matilda, Charles, Rosa, Edward, Clara and Cecelia.

GEORGE STENZHORN, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Freeport; born April 2, 1831, in Germany; in 1850 he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 150 acres of land, well improved; has been School Director. Married Rosa Lippman in 1854; she was born in 1837, in Germany; they have five children — George, Peter, Rosena, Kate and Elizabeth; Margaret died in 1872, aged 17 years; Henry died in 1876, aged 9 years.

MENE VANLOH, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Baileyville; born March, 1829, in Germany; in 1855 he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 295 acres of land. Married Catherine Bohen, in 1855; she was horn in Germany; they have six children—Lizzie, Jennie, John, George, Katie and Tillie.

CAPT. WILLIAM YOUNG, [illustration], farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Freeport; born Feb. 9, 1820, in Union Co. Penn.; in 1839 he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; on coming to this county he entered about 400 acres; he now owns about 600 acres of land. He raised a company and was commissioned Captain in 1862, in Co. G, 46th T. V. I.; was wounded at the battle of Shiloh, for which he receives a pension; he was elected County Treasurer in 1863, held this office one term; he has also been Supervisor of Lancaster Township. Married Miss Ann Reitzell, in 1857; she was born in Lancaster Co., Penn.; they have six children — James H., John C, Jonathan R., Sarah, Elizabeth and Mary. Mr. Young is a Republican in politics.

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Remarkable Stories, Volume 1
by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a Licensed Massage Therapist and Life Coach. An amateur historian, parts of these stories and many more appear on his website, www.robertbike.com.

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HARLEM TOWNSHIP

CHARLES W. BARBER, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Freeport; Charles and Robert, with the rest of James W. Barber's family, live on the old estate, which their father bought of Joseph Green, in 1843; the family number ten — Charles W., born Oct. 22, 1823; Sarah B., born Oct. 29, 1825; Thomas, born June 12, 1827; Robert, born Sept. 13, 1829; Mary, born Nov. 20, 1831; Hannah, born Feb. 7, 1834; Amelia, born June 29, 1836; Eleanor, born May 19, 1839; Benjamin, born June 3, 1841, and Susan, born Oct. 13, 1843; the last was born in this county, the others in Pennsylvania; Charles W., the eldest, and Robert now own the farm, consisting of 320 acres, valued at $50 an acre. They were convinced, a short time after taking the farm in hand, that there was more money in stock than small grain, so sold off their inferior breeds, and now have the broad acres of the paternal estate feeding Clydesdale horses and full-blood short-horns. The two boys and Mary, Hannah and Ellen are at home now; Sarah B. married O. P. McCool, and lives on an adjoining farm. The boys are Republicans, and have held both township and school offices.

HENRY S. BARBER, farmer and lumberman, Sec. 13; P. O. Freeport; born in Union Co., Penn., in Dec. 27, 1818; left Pennsylvania April 18, 1837, with a party whose names were Dr. Van Valzeh, Joseph Green, son of Gen. Green, Carpenter Miller, Henry S. Barber, John Fisher, Jr., John Glover, Jr., Nathan and Israel Sheets; they were seven weeks coming out; their route was through to Pittsburg, then south through Washington Co., crossing the Ohio at Wheeling, took the National Road and passed Zanesville and Columbus, Ohio, Richmond, Ind., Indianapolis, crossed the Wabash at Covington, and saw the first prairie, then passed through Danville and came to Peoria, on the Illinois River, then to Dixon, Buffalo Grove, Crane's Grove, just six miles south of Freeport; in Freeport the only cabin they saw belonged to William Baker; they then made their own road, eighteen miles to Rock Grove, passed two old cabins belonging to Dr. Van Valzeh and the Widow Wilcoxen, arrived at Rock Grove on May 30, 1837. Henry S. Barber remained eighteen months, and then went back to Pennsylvania, and in 1839, brought fourteen teams with him. There were Joseph Mercer's, Benjamin Chambers', Peter D. Fisher's, George Fisher's James McElhaney's, Grandfather Sheets', Charles W. Cummings', Robert Barber's, beside John Fisher, Jr.. Harry Klapp and James Chambers and wife. Henry S. then set to work improving the farm at Rock Grove; lived there till 1850; went to Monroe, Wis., and was in town seven years; then put up a saw-mill run by steam, seven miles west of Monroe, and kept that seven years; sold out and then moved into this county to Rock Run; was there from 1863 to 1868, then moved to this farm on Sec 13; owns now 160 acres, value $60 per acre. Has been Justice of the Peace and Supervisor; is a Republican. He was married in 1842, to Miss Mary Fisher, of Union Co., Penn.; they have six children; two married; Lewis and Frank are now dead, and Ashley, Lizzie C. and Charles F. are alive. Henry S.'s father, Robert Barber, with Dr. Van Valzeh, Gen. Green, and Judge Schnable, came to see and bought claims in 1836; one of these claims embraces the mill site of the present Cedar Creek Mills, which the Doctor built during the summer of 1837, and run that winter; he then sold half-interest to his brother-in-law, Joseph Green, and they bought Sec. 13, Township 2 north, and Range 7 west, of William Robey. Green took the east half, and the Doctor the west, and in 1841, built the house where Henry S. Barber now lives; the Doctor moved East in 1842, and died in Lewistown, Mifflin Co., Penn., in the year 1870, May 6. He was the second practicing physician in Stephenson Co.; the Doctor's sons are all physician, Howard, Robert and John, and David is in the regular army.

GEORGE J. BENTLEY, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Freeport; born in Winslow, Stephenson Co., Ill., Feb. 26, 1858; moved to his present home in 1859, with his father, where he has been since, and is now farming the old place of 380 acres, valued at $55 per acre. George's father, C. N. Bentley, was born July 24, 1827, in the State of Massachusetts; he moved to New York in 1829, to Chautauqua Co., and left there in 1853, and came to this county, settling near Shannon, soon after moving to Winslow; about this time he took a trip to Des Moines, Iowa; when he came back, in 1859, he had a yoke of oxen and one horse; from 1858 to 1859 the family had a very hard time of it, but after settling here, where they at present live, he has prospered, and acquired this valuable property. He is a Democrat. In 1845, he married Miss Electa Smith, of New York, who is three years his senior; the old family consists of eight children — Lewis D., Jennie L., Alvey, and one died before it was christened, George J., Lidia, Charles and Viola, of whom only three are living. Lewis D. enlisted and served three years in Co. D, 46th I. V. I.,; came home in 1865, and in June was thrown from a horse and killed. Jennie is married to H. B. Price, and lives also on the old farm. George J., who now has charge of the farm, was married Feb. 26, 1879, to Miss Lily K. Barton, of Jo Daviess Co., Ill. He is in politics a Democrat; his father, Cecil N., has held several public offices, Commissioner of the Highways for nine years, School Director and School Trustee.

E. BENNETT, farmer and manufacturer, Sec. 18; P. O. Elroy; born in Somerset Co., England, May 26, 1824; until 18 years of age he farmed and worked in woolen mills; in 1842 he sailed for America; on reaching New York he engaged at his trade, and in farming; he at different times worked in Onandaga, Oneida and Madison; worked in the woolen factory at Baldwinsville until coming West; after arriving in Illinois he worked rented places till he was able to buy; he then bought the farm on which he now lives, embracing 122 broad acres under fine cultivation, valued at $50 an acre. In politics he is a Republican. Married Miss Livinia Phelps, of New York, in January, 1852. They had five children — Emma, Charles, Mary, Clara and Hattie, all at home; his wife died in 1871.

LUDWIG BROEND, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Freeport; was born in Germany, April 12, 1827, and worked on the farm in the old country until 25 years of age; he then left for America in 1852, and without any further delay came to Stephenson Co., Ill., and has lived here since, a period of twenty-eight years. The farm he owns at present consists of 160 acres of highly improved and carefully tilled soil, 40 acres of which he has cleared of timber himself; the probable value today, about $50 an acre; since settling in Stephenson Co. he has held some school offices. Is a Democrat in politics, and belongs to the Presbyterian Church. On the 4th of October, 1855, he married Miss Mary Frubel, a native of Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany; they have six children — Lui, Kate, Henry, Mary, Frederick, and one not christened.

HENRY BURKARD, farmer and wagon-maker, Sec. 14; P. O. Freeport; born in Baden, Germany, 2d July, 1837; at the age of 10, his father and family came to America; without delay they moved on to the West, and on the 4th of July camped near Yellow Creek Brewery, and on the 5th of July, 1847, settled on the farm which his father bought of the Government; as soon he was old enough he learned the wagon-maker's trade, and opened a shop of his own, which he run eight years; he went up to Minnesota, but soon returned, when he went to Missouri, then to Kansas, and soon came back to Missouri again, into Platte Co.; went to making wagon trains consisting of twenty-eight wagons to the train, bought by parties going to Pike's Peak; the war of the rebellion stopped him, and, after going to Tennessee, he returned to Stephenson Co.; this trip lasted from 1859 to 1861. After his father's death he took the farm; he now owns 80 acres, valued at $40 per acre; he has been Collector and Assessor; has held school offices. Is now a Democrat, and belongs to the Catholic Church. Mr. Burkard married Miss Magdalena Jaeger in 1861; they were married at her home; she and her parents are natives of Germany; Mr. and Mrs. Burkard had six children — John A., Frank L., Margaret K., Eva M., Joseph H. and Anna L.; the last one has been dead two years.

THOMPSON W. COCKRELL, farmer, and proprietor of Scioto Flouring Mills, Sec. 11; P. O. Freeport; born in Ohio, Sciota Co., Sept. 11, 1823; he was a farmer in his native State, and started for the West on July 1, 1841; stayed one winter in Jersey Co., Ill., then came here, and, beside the mill property, owns 450 acres of land, valued at $40 an acre; he has held township and school offices. Is a Republican, having cast his first vote for James K. Polk. Mr. Cockrell has never married. His father, a native of Virginia, had a family of nine children — T. Moses, George, Mary (now married to Mr. Bodkin), Scynthia, Thompson, Harriet and Patsie Jones; beside these, two stayed in Ohio — Susan and Lina. Mr. Cockrell came into full possession of the flouring mills in 1855; the Scioto Flouring Mills are 40x50 feet on the ground, three and a half stories high, and have three runs of stone — one for feed and two for custom-work; the water-power is an Eclipse turbine wheel, ten-horse power, thirty inches in diameter, with a capacity of grinding eight bushels an hour; the mill was built by Rezin Wilcoxon, William Irvin and Samuel Sutherland; building commenced in 1850, and it started on the 1st of January, 1852; in 1853, Mr. Irvin sold his interest to Samuel Sutherland; Rezin Wilcoxon dying near the close of 1853, Mr. Cockrell purchased his interest in the flouring mill in the year 1854, and in 1855 Samuel Sutherland sold his interest to Mr. Cockrell, and he has full possession of the mill property up to the present date; there is a saw-mill run by the same power; it was built in 1837 by Levi Rezin and Thompson Wilcoxon, and was running in August of the same year; it is 20x50 feet, with one up-and-down saw, capable of turning out 2,000 feet a day of hardwood lumber; Levi sold his interest in 1841 to his brother Rezin, and, on the division of his estate among the heirs, the ?aw-mill was left to Thermuthis, who has possession now.

THOMAS EWING, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Freeport; born in Washing- Co., Penn., near Pittsburg, Feb. 5, 1818; stayed at home till 18 years of age, then went to Holmes Co., Ohio; in 1836 he engaged in the mercantile and grain business; he started for Freeport in Nov., 1848, where he stayed, giving his attention to mercantile pursuits; in 1860, he went on to a farm, near Shannon, Carroll Co., Ill.; he was there four years; sold out and bought a farm here, one and a half miles north, called the Waddle farm, but, liking this farm better, bought it of Hiram Bright, and is now working it; the farm contains 142 acres, valued at $60 per acre; he has held township and school offices. Is a Republican, and has been ever since the party was organized. Mr. Ewing joined the Presbyterian Church when 18 years old, in Washington Co., Penn., and in May, 1840, married Miss Sarah Haughey, Steubenville, Jefferson Co., Ohio; they have had six children— Julia A., William T., John A., Sarah E., Mary O. and Flo Ewing. Mr. EwiDg's father is of Irish extraction, and came to Chester Co., Penn.,when 7 years of age; here he grew to manhood, and was married to Miss Sarah Mathews, who was a native of Chester. His mother is now dead, but his father is a hale, hearty old man of 90 years of age.

CHRISTIAN FETZER, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Damascus; born in Wurtemberg, Germany, Feb. 20, 1836; emigrated to America in 1848; stayed in Chicago one year, and came to Freeport, Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1837; he helped his father, who was a mason by trade, for two years, then moved on the farm, where his father died in 1878; Christian now owns 88J acres, valued at $45 an acre; he has held township and school offices. Is a Democrat, and belongs to the Lutheran Reformed Church. In May, 1869, he married Miss Elizabeth Weitzel, of Pennsylvania; they have three children — Mary, Delia and Frederick; Mr. Fetzer enlisted in the 46th I. V. I. in 1862, and was mustered out in 1865; he participated in the battles of Jackson, Miss., Ft. Blakeley, and a number of lively skirmishes; there were eighty-five killed of his regiment at Jackson; he came through without a scratch.

C. H. FURRY, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Freeport; born near Catawissa, Columbia Co., Penn., Oct. 8, 1824; is a farmer of the old Pennsylvania type; is now living on the Emanuel Witter place, which embraces a beautiful and fertile piece of land of 160 acres; he has just ceased serving his district as their popular and efficient School Director. As a public man, he has always been of Republican principles. In June, 1851, he married Miss Barbara Stroup, of Pennsylvania; this union was blessed with six children — Alfred, William, Mary, Ann Alida, Joseph, Franklin L. and Clinton D.

CHARLES A. HART, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Freeport; born near Egermon, Mass., Jan. 9, 1835; left home in 1842 for Ohio; his father's family numbered eight, of whom only his brother L. H. and himself, are in Illinois; they were named Sarah, Newton, Julia, Solomon, Lorenzo, Mary J., Charles A. and one now dead; they stayed in Ohio until 1854, when he came to this county; stayed in Freeport, working by the month until 1865, when he married Miss Amanda M. Doebler, on the 22d of September; they have three children — U. Rosetta, N. DeWitt and Clifton D. Mr. Hart is a Democrat, and has held township and school offices; he belongs to the United Brethren Church, at Elroy; he owns about 100 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre.

PHILIP HERRBRUCK, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Damascus; born in Bavaria, Germany, May 9, 1818; he was a farmer in the Fatherland, and served one year and six months in the army; left there for this country Nov. 18, 1847, at the age of 29 years; he stopped in New York, then went to Pennsylvania, and stayed till about 1859; he was in Lehigh, Northampton and Monroe Cos., farming there; came here, and settled down in 1859; owns 174 acres in Sees. 4, 5 and 8, probable value $35 per acre. He is a Democrat, and belongs to the German Reformed Church. Mr. Herrbruck, in 1850, married Miss Maria Decker; this was during his stay in Bethlehem, Northampton Co., Penn.; she is a native of Germany, and had come to this country two years before he did; they had nine children; the first one died without a name; the others were Ottilea, Louisa, Henry, Susanna, Adeline, Andrew, Louis and Kate.

HENRY HILL, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Freeport; born in Mecklenburg Schwerin, Germany, the 21st of June, 1827; emigrated to America in 1866, in January; stayed in New York seven years, and .came to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1873, where he has been since busily improving his farm, consisting of 80 acres, which he values at about $50 per acre. In politics he is a Democrat, and is a member of the Lutheran Church, in Freeport. He married Miss Sophia Peck, in December of the year 1873, and their family now consists of four children — John, Fred, William and Sophia.

JOSEPH HUTMACHER, farmer and carpenter, Sees. 8 and 17; P. O. Freeport; born at Chestnut Hill, Monroe Co., Penn., 28th of Noyember, 1830; stayed at home and farmed and worked in father's saw-mill until 26 years of age. He married in 1853, when 22; his wife died in 1866, January, four years after coming to Illinois. He arrived in Stephenson Co. April 22,1856: lived in township of Erin first, then on an old farm west of his present home, on what is now Adam Hutmacher's farm, of 40 acres; he sold out there and bought his present farm of 160 acres, valued at $45 per acre. He is a Democrat in politics and German Reform iu religion. Has held the office of Collector of Taxes, been Assessor for six years, and is Supervisor now, which office he has held for four years, and also School Treasurer, for six years; his first appointment was March 9, 1864. Mr. Hutmacher married his second wife June 22, 1862; they were married in this township, in the old house on the Adam Hutmacher place; his wife's maiden name was Mary Ann Whiteside, of Northamton Co., Penn.; they have had twelve children — William, Mahlon, Alfred, Adam, Helena, Thomas, James, Eliza, Alta, Isabel, Tidas, Julia. His pareuts are now living, at the advanced age of 75 and 76 years, in Pennsylvania, and his wife's mother lives in Waddams.

ABRAHAM JERMAN, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Freeport; born in Northampton Co., Penn., March 24, 1813; he left his native county in 1831, at the age of 18, and after stopping awhile in Mountour Co., came to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1862; he is farming his 72 acres, which he bought on coming here, valued at about $55 an acre. He has held school offices, and in politics he is a Republican; belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church. He married first, in 1836, and again in 1847; his present wife was formerly Miss Barbara Howland; they have had but one child — Ellen E.

CHRISTIAN KIESTER, farmer, P. O. Freeport; born in Union Co., Penn., 30th of March, 1837; he stayed at his childhood's home until he was 7 years of age, and in 1844, in the spring, struck out for the West, and came to Stephenson Co., Ill., where he bought a farm of 160 acres, in Sec. 32, his present home; the improvements he has made on the land make the probable value $50 per acre; when the war broke out he enlisted, in 1861, in Co. E., 45th I. V. I., commonly called the Leadmine Regiment; he participated in the battles of Shiloh, Raymond, Champion Hills, siege of Vicksburg, and several skirmishes; was disabled, and then went to Rock Island on guard duty; finally mustered out at Washington, Sept. 22, 1864. In Oct. 1864, he married Miss Maria Fox, of York Co., Penn.; no children.

GEORGE KOHL Sr., farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Freeport; born in Pike Co., Penn., Sept. 20, 1813; stayed at home until he was 18 years of age, and went to Lycoming Co., in 1831; engaged in farming during his stay of nineteen years there, when he moved to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1850, in the month of May; he has been engaged since in farming a large farm, which he owns, of 310 acres, located on Sees. 27, 28 and 30, and valued at about $40 per acre. During his eventful life he has held both township and school offices. He is a Republican, and belongs to the Presbyterian Church. He married Miss Mary Will, at her home in Lycoming Co., Penn., in 1836, on the 18th of September. Children of his family, nine altogether, were Daniel, Benjamin, George W., Susanna, Nancy, Mary, Joseph, Nicolas and Samuel, now dead.

GEORGE W. KOHL, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Freeport; born in Pennsylvania, July 12, 1847; came to Stephenson Co., Ill., with his father, in 1850, at the age of 3 years; he has occupied his present farm ever since settlement, having 200 acres, which he values at $40 per acre. His politics are Republican. In April, 1870, he married Miss Louisa Herbruck; they have two children, named Harvey and Mary. George, like his father, has held both township and school offices. He also enlisted in the 142d I. V. L, Co. E., and served three months.

AARON KOSTENBADEN, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Freeport; born in Columbia Co., Penn., March 22, 1817; left there in 1823, and went to Union Co., where he stayed till 23 years of age; went, in 1840, to Hancock Co., Ohio; from there to Seneca Co., where he worked at cabinet-work, and has made all his own furniture; is now making his sons'. He stayed in Seneca Co. until coming here; he was a single man when he arrived in Stephenson Co., Ill., November of 1845; he then returned to his native State, in 1846, and, in 1847, returned to Illinois, and, in the fall, married Miss Margaret Newcomb, of Pennsylvania; the marriage took place four miles from the city of Freeport, at her home, now called the Reasoner farm; after 17 years of married life, his wife died, in May, 1864; he has since been a widower. He owns 334 acres, valued at $60 per acre; near his house, he has one of the best stone-quarries in the State, if properly opened; curious to say, he has been on the farm without intermission for twenty-six years, except a visit to Cedarville of three years. His politics are Republican; Fremont was his first candidate. He belongs to the German Reform Church. It is a curious fact, that his father had a family of ten boys, all alive, and the oldest is now 70. Of his present neighbors, Murdaugh came before he did two years, and Flausburg one year. He had eight children by his marriage — Samuel, Susanna, Lizzie, Henry, Jacob, Reuben, Daniel and Solomon. Samuel, his oldest, in October, 1875, married Miss Mary Ann Crow; he is a carpenter and farmer; built his own house (and owns 40 acres in Sec. 16); Samuel and his wife are at John Smallwood's house; she is a native of this State; they have two children named Laura Mabel and Aaron.

LEVI LAW, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Cedarville; born in Lebanon Co., Penn.. Dec. 13, 1824; came to Stephenson Co. in 1856; from 18 years of age he has followed milling; when he came here he run the Scioto Flouring Mills for eight years; then, his health failing, he bought this farm, in 1865, and moved into the house in 1866; owns 70 acres, valued at $50 per acre; with the help of his boys has carved his fair acres from the dark forest; the people of the township made him Road Commissioner; he has also held school offices. In politics a Republican, and belongs to the Lutheran Reform Church. In 1846, he married Miss Rebecca Dierweicher, of Pennsylvania; they had six children — William J., now in Iowa; Amanda A., Roland M., John H., Jerome F. and Aaron A., now in Iowa, married, and one child. Mr. Law had two brothers in the army; Henry S. was taken prisoner on Missionary Ridge and starved to death in Andersonville; John, with his family, now lives in Cedarville, Buckeye Township.

MARTIN LAWLESS, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Damascus; born in Ireland County of Dublin, in 1822, Feb. 3, within seven miles of the city of Dublin; sailed from Ireland for New York, in 1848, and went to work for Harvey Otis, of Kingston, Ulster Co.; stayed with him five years, then went to Freeport, where he stayed until he went to work Col. Putnam's farm near the city, where he was for six years, then for five more on Elias Perkins' place; he moved from there to his present home, about the year 1865; his farm embraces 75 broad acres, valued at $15. He has held township and school offices. In politics a Democrat, and belongs to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1847, on the 3d of October, he married Miss Mary DeLap, of Ireland; they have six children living — John, Hubert, Martin, William, George and Charles; George is a teacher; in the summer he works the farm, and in winter teaches school.

OLIVER P. McCOOL, Sec. 24; P. O. Freeport; born in Union Co., Penn., Aug. 29, 1820; he came to Stephenson Co., in 1840, with his father, Joseph McCool; they took a boat at Pittsburg, Penn., and lauded at a place named Keithsburg, consisting of two or three cabins; it has since been the county seat; during the summer they were there, Dr. Van Valzeh. who was running for the Legislature, came down there and induced them to go to Stephenson Co., where they arrived in October, 1840; Lancaster Township was their first location; then moved on to Sec. 13, Harlem; were there from 1840 to 1843, when they settled on the land where they now live. Joseph
McCool was a public man, and served as Sheriff of Stephenson Co., and died in 1844, Feb. 14, while in office; his wife is now living with Oliver P., on the old place, at the ripe old age of 87 years; their family consisted of nine children; eldest son now lives in Freeport; Eliza Ann, now wife of Robert Bell, lives in Freeport; three daughters — Jane, Lucretia and Margaret — are in Fayette Co., Iowa; Mary Foster is a widow and lives in Madison, Wis.; Henrietta is dead, and James, the youngest, is now an engineer on the railroad; Oliver P. has a farm now of 110 acres, valued at $60 an acre; he has been a public man all his life; first served in Lancaster Township, when the present part of Harlem, where he lives, belonged to that township; has been Overseer of Highways, Trustee, two terms Board of Supervisors; his second term was served in 1867; in 1873, was County Treasurer, and again in 1875. He married Miss S. B. Barber, of Union Co., Penn., May 2, 1854; their family numbers eight children, one is dead — Susan B., lives with the Barber family; James B., Nellie, Emily B., Joseph, Henrietta and Charles B., all at home. Mr. McCool is a Democrat, and used to belongto the M. E. Church. Mr. McCool's father was born in Rockridge Co. Va., in the immediate vicinity of the great Natural Bridge, May 25, 1794; when a boy be removed to Bowling Green, Warren Co., Ky., and grew up to manhood there; by this time he had traveled some, and had seen the effects of slavery; he made up his mind never to make his home in a slave country; when a young man, he went to Union Co. Penn., and married there, March 18, 1818, to Miss Eleanor Nevins, who was born in Union Co., Penn., Oct 29, 1793; Mr. McCool died Feb. 14, 1844; Mrs. McCool is still living with her son, at the age of 87 years.

EDWARD MARTIN, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Freeport; born in England, Jan. 10, 1827; came to America with his father in the spring of 1849, and traveled with the family to Chicago by team, and on to Stephenson Co., Ill.: at Albert Hall's tavern, got out before daybreak and went on to the old Tisdale Tavern, or what was known as Pleasant Hill, and got his breakfast, then went on to Waddams Grove, and went to work; here he earned his first dollar, and from this start has gone on until he bought himself a farm in 1854, of 40 acres, valued at $50 per acre; after getting through with his work at Waddams Grove, he wanted to find his father and mother, whom he had left at Hall's Tavern some time before; in going back there he found them on the spot where his house now stands. He is a Republican in politics, voted for Fremont, has held the office of Tax Collecter, Overseer of Highways, also school offices. Sept. 1, 1854, he married Miss Polly Clay, of Ohio; was married near Waddams; they had eleven children — Delilah, Sophia, Mary E., Harriet, John F., Margaret, William, Ellie F., Kate, Huldah Ann and Edward.

JOHN MARTIN, Sr., farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Freeport; born in Sussex, Co., England, May 6, 1802; did not leave his native country until 1849; was farming land owned by his father, and when he died, a legacy of £1,000 was left John, who then farmed for himself, but with such poor success that at the age of 47 he found he had lost all, so started for America; he landed in New York in 1849; came West and bought 40 acres, on which he lives, now farmed by his son, John Martin, Jr.; it is valued at $50 per acre. He is a Republican, and belongs to the Episcopal Church. Mr. Martin, in 1823, in July, married Miss Mary Ann Fedard, of England; they were married in Whiteside, Kent Co.; have had nine children — Harriet, Edward, John, Elizabeth, Stephen, Thomas, Henry, Mary Ann and James.

WILLIAM MEADS, farmer; P. O. Cedarville; born in Maryland, July 19, 1817; he lived there until 1879, engaged in the shoe trade, milling, and farming with his father; the old family numbered six boys, of whom four are living — James Meads, now in Iowa; William, the subject of this sketch; Nathan, in Pennsylvania, and Aquilla. Mr. Meads, on the 21st of January, 1839, married Miss Ann Gibson, of Pennsylvania; their family were — Franklin, deceased; William; Amos, deceased; Mary Ann, now Mrs. Akins; Benjamin, living in Freeport; Leah, in Pennsylvania, and Nathaniel. Mr. Meads now lives quietly on his town property. In politics he is a Democrat, and belongs to the Evangelical Church of Cedarville.

GEORGE MERNITZ, farmer and blacksmith, Sec. 36; P. O. Freeport; born in Germany, Sept. 10, 1837; he emigrated to America with his parents in 1852, and settled in Stephenson Co. in 1861, where he has given his attention to farming and overseeing his blacksmith shop, which he erected when he first came; be owns 8 acres of land, valued at $150 an acre, with his city property. In politics, he is a Republican. He married in 1868, Miss Susan Sanspzer, of Illinois; they have two children — Willie and Albert.

THOMAS METZ, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Freeport; born Nov. 12, 1834, in Northampton Co., Penn., and came to Stephenson Co. with his father in 1838; he formerly lived on the David Walkee farm, where they lived for sixteen years, and have been on this place for twenty-five years; he owns 16 acres of timber and 55 acres of improved land; the probable value is $45 an acre. His politics are Democratic. Mr. Metz was married in the spring of 1867, in March, to Miss Eliza Merrill, of New York; they have five children — Flora, George, Fred, Verne and Mary.

LEWIS MEYERS, wagonmaker, Sec. 18; P. O. Eleroy; born in Germany, April 25, 1827; came to this country in 1853, when 20 years of age; from New York he went to Bradford Co., Penn., and moved West to Stephenson Co. in 1855, and worked fur Mr. Kreitte in Freeport, for one and a half years; he then moved to Loran, and worked at his trade ten years there, and finally went to Eleroy, where he carried on wagon-making for six years, and in 1873 moved on to his present location; but it was not until the spring of 1878 that he moved his shop down; he owns now 80 acres, which he farms, valued at $55 an acre. In 1855, he married Miss Matilda Trich; they have seven children — Mary (now Mrs. L. Grilman), William H., Liddie L., Tillie E., L. Frank, Charles E. and Clyde G. Mr. Meyers enlisted in the 15th I. V. I., Co. H r and was mustered out in Springfield in 1804. Conrad is here on the farm; his sister, Charlotte (now Mrs. Flickinger), and William, living in Jefferson Township. Lewis is a Republican; also belongs to the Evangelical Church, of which he is a class-leader, and Rev. Charles Feler, minister.

E. R. MULNIX, farmer and school teacher, Sec. 15; P. O. Freeport; born in Delaware Co., N. Y., Aug. 23, 1820; lived at home until 1855; farmed and studied from 1848 to 1855; he taught, clerked and finally went West; during his first visit he stayed on the very spot where his house is now built; he then went on to Iowa, farming and teaching in the winter for some thirteen years; didn't like it in Fayette Co., Iowa, so he sold out and came back, and settled on this place in 1809, and has been here since. He owns what used to be three farms — the Jim Smallwood farm, the Henry Smallwood farm and the piece his house stands on, called the Sheller farm. The farm now contains 220 acres, valued at $60 per acre. While in Iowa, Fayette Co., on March 27, 1850, he married Miss Desdemona Dunham, of Mercer Co., Penn.; they have had six children — Mahlon D., Stella, Romana D., Corintha A., Sarah D. and Lola D. Mr. Mulnix, in politics, is a Republican, or what he terms an equal-rights man, and a member of the Christian Church, or what he calls a Union man. His references are Matt., 10th c, 18th v., and John, 17th c, which prove that the union of the church is what is desired, and so he is a Union man in religion.

O. B.MUNN, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Freeport; born in St. Lawrence Co., N. Y.j March 10, 1817; living in his native county until he attained his 24th year; then coming directly to Stephenson Co. in the year 1841, Sept. 20, and has been engaged farming since; owns at present 100 acres, valued at $75 per acre. Politics, Republican; religion, united with the Presbyterian Church in 1842. Has held township and school offices. Married in 1845, Miss Ellen W. Vandyke, of Pennsylvania; six children in all — Joseph O., Charles H., Edgar W., Mary Ellen, Mary Emma and Carrie. Parents of Mr. Munn native Americans; grandfather Munn was with Ethan Allan at the capture of Ft. Ticonderoga.

JOSEPH R. MURDOUGH, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Damascus. Joseph's father, James Murdough, came to Stephenson Co. in 1839; lived first in Buckeye and then in Lancaster Township, and then settled on Sec. 8 in 1840, living in a log house until 1857, when he built a grout house, which is now occupied by C. A. Hart; in 1805, he moved on to the present homestead in Sec. 9. In 1841, he married Miss Margaret McGee, of Ireland; their family consisted of ten children — one son died in the army, Joseph R., Margaret A., Sarah J., Thomas S., Mary R., Hannah W., Elizabeth D., Mary C., Ebenezer D.; Joseph is taking care of the farm; Margaret is now Mrs. William Laird, of Nebraska; Mary C. is with them; Elizabeth, now Mrs. William Waddams, lives in Waddams, the rest are dead; Joseph R. was born Sept. 8, 1843, and in 1803 started West; teamed and mined in Montana, Colorado, Dakota, Idaho and Utah, and came back in 1800; he then went to Nebraska, Pawnee Co.; kept bachelor's ranche till 1879, and got back home 19th of April. He married Miss Sophia Beke, of Pennsylvania, 10th of May, 1880, by Squire Jaeger. Has held township and school offices, and is a Democrat.

FRANK PICKARD, farmer, Sees. 18 and 7; P. O. Eleroy; born in Stephenson Co., Ill., Dec. 10, 1850; his ancestors were old settlers in the West; grandfather, Smith W. Pickard, born in Ovid, Seneca Co., N. Y., Sept. 24, 1795; was a soldier in 1812; moved to Stephenson Co. in 1838; left his son, Jonas L. Pickard, and went back to Wisconsin and went to farming; in 1813, was a licensed preacher of M. E. Church; as was his wish, he died in church, Oct. 18, 1873; Jonas L., the father of Frank, was born Nov. 25, 1817, in Cayuga Co., N. Y.; learned wool-carding as a trade; came out West with his father in 1838, and settled at Waddams; bought this, the homestead, in 1842; the patent was signed by James K. Polk; he died Jan. 25, 1875, leaving a family of six children — Willard Scott, born Feb. 10, 1845; Marion Winfield, born Jan. 28, 1848; Lorenzo Finley, born April 5, 1849; Emily, born March 30, 1852; Frank Fremont, born Dec. 10, 1856; Delta, born July 4, 1860; Frank F. now farms the estate, containing 83 acres, valued at $50 an acre. He is a Republican, and belongs to the Evangelical Association. Married Miss Susan Herrbruck, June 2, 1877, of Pennsylvania; had one child, named Delta Inez, who died when 22 months of age.

WILLIAM F. PRESTON, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Freeport; was born in Gallipolis, Ohio, June 19, 1819, and while there was farming and also learned the cabinet trade; he went to Butler Co., Ohio, in 1838, and ran a grist mill, but, it not paying, he sold out and came West to this county, where his brother was then working the farm where Mr. Preston now lives, which he had taken as a claim; his father was living here at that time — fall of 1838 — having been surveying for the Government in the State of Michigan from 1816 to 1819; he was a very popular man and a good surveyor, and at one time it was thought that he could have laid out the site of the city of Freeport on the land now occupied by his farm; he died at the advanced age of 92 years. Mr. Preston, after coming to this county, settled dowu to farming, which he followed until 1848, when he went to California, getting there 7th of October, 1848, having then driven oxen from Butler Co., Ohio, to the Pacific, and walking all the way, with the exception of about 250 miles; having made a stake in California, set sail in a steamer for the Isthmus of Panama; he walked from Panama across the Isthmus to the River Chagres, and by boat down to the city of the same name; from thence to Havana, and then to New Orleans, up the Mississippi to Galena, and by stage home to his farm, getting there in 1851; and, in 1856, put up a saw-mill, and run till January, 1869, then turned his mill into a corn-crib, and has been farming since; owns 140 acres, value $60 per acre. He has been Overseer of Highways and Township Clerk for a number of years; is now holding last-named office; is a Democrat, and belongs to the United Brethren Church in Harlem Centre, which he helped to build and organize in 1869. In 1860 he married, and again, to his present wife, in August 25, 1874, Miss Amy S. Brigham, of Pennsylvania; he has three sons, named William, Tecumseh and Rupert.

R. C. SCHOFIELD, Sec. 36; P. O. Freeport; born in Chautauqua Co., N. Y., April 1, 1812; came to Stephenson Co., Ill., Oct. 21, 1844; has been engaged in farming all his life to present time; owns — acres of land, which he lives on, besides three dwellings in the city of Freeport. Politics, Democrat from Andrew Jackson's time; religion, Baptist. Married, in 1830, Miss Mary Sterns, of Vermont; have five children living — Margaret E., Silas C, Elizabeth C, Milton E. and Julia O.; and two deceased, Mary A. and Aurelia Ann. Mr. Schofield is uncle to Gen. Schofield, of West Point at present.

GEORGE F. SCHOENE, farmer, Sees. 5 and 8; P. O. Damascus; born in Baden, Germany, 17th of May, 1838; left for America in 1846; landed in New York, and went to Hamburg, Erie Co.; carried on the dairy business ten years, when he took the Western fever, sold out and went to Peoi'ia, Ill., where he was taken sick, and remained from August to next April; his mother and family had followed him west, going into Iowa; hearing that he was sick, his brother went down and took him to Dubuque, Iowa; from there they came to Freeport; from there went to a place on Sec. 11 and worked for T. Cockrell ten years; he then bought his present farm, located on Sees. 5 and 8, of 120 acres, valued at $50 per acre. He has held township and school offices, is a Democrat, and has been a member of the Lutheran Church. On Nov. 7, 1865, he married Miss Louisa Yerk, of Pennsylvania; they had four children, two living — Emily, born in 1874; and Mary, 1877; two deceased; adopted one boy.

A. J. SEYLER, of the firm of Eel & Seyler, Cedarville, manufacturers of the Eel & Seyler Middlings Purifier, patented 1876 and 1877; this firm was established in 1865, as a mill-wrighting business, and was about to be dissolved, but A. J. Seyler conceived the idea of inventing a purifier; in the fall of 1874 he commenced the machine which has now proved such a success, that, by perfecting from time to time in John H. Addams' flouring mills, it is now supplanting other machines in the mills throughout the county. They have two in Goddard's mill, in Freeport.

GEORGE SEYLER, tailor, Cedarville; born in Centre Co., Penn., Sept. 26, 1815; learned his trade when 14 years of age, and has been at it for fifty years; has made clothes for Grandfather Clingman; he left Pennsylvania in 1846, and came up to where Cedarville is now, nothing but woods then, and but few neighbors; he thought he must starve, but soon had a good trade, and built himself a cabin on what was then the Ilgen part of town site, it being owned by Ilgen, John H. Addams and Montellius; he lived in the log cabin until 1850, then built a brick dwelling, where he lived for two years and then sold; Mr. Sill now lives there; he then built this house and has lived here since. In 1839, he married Miss Mary Potts, of Pennsylvania; they have six children — Amelia, William M., both deceased; George A., lives in Cedarville, Martha A., Andrew J. and Elizabeth, now Mrs. Shaffer. George's father, Peter Seyler, had twelve children in his family; seven now alive, only two, however, in Illinois.

JOSEPH SMITH, farmer and tailor, Sec. 3; P. O. Cedarville; born in Baden, Germany, May 14, 1827; came to America in 1847, when 20 years of age, and stayed in Buffalo, N. Y., till 1853, working at tailoring; he then went to Chicago, Ill., where he worked at his trade and kept saloon for three years, and in 1856, moved to Cedarville, where his father and mother lived then, but they are now dead; he worked at his trade up to 1866, when he bought the farm he now lives on, which consists of 76 acres, valued at $40 an acre. He is a Democrat, and belongs to the Catholic Church. In 1860, July 26, he married Miss Mary Swartz, a native of Darmstadt, Germany; she has been dead six years; they had four children — Francis, John, Mary and Kate; all at home but Francis, who lives at Mr. Levi Law's.

FREDERICK SPANGLER, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Freeport; born in Stephenson Co., Ill., April 23, 1853; from boyhood he has farmed, and the farm he lives on now has always been his home, though before he was married he roved through the adjoining States: finally, thinking there was no place like home, settled on the old farm, which embraces 70 acres in Sees. 26 and 27, valued at $45 an acre. In politics is a Democrat, and belongs to the Catholic Church. In Dec. 23, 1877, he married Miss Maggie Kinniger, of this State; their family now consists of two children — Joseph M. and Frederick J.

JOHN STEFFEN, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Freeport; born in Prussia, March 23, 1835; started for America Oct. 16, 1860, and came right to Stephenson Co.; he now owns 40 acres of land, valued at $55 an acre. He fanned until 1865, and then went into the army; was private in 38th, I. V. I., Co. A; was taken sick with small-pox, and got a furlough of three months; was with his regiment in North Carolina, and went through several lively skirmishes; was mustered out in 1866, at Victoria, Texas. He then came home, after leaving the army, but went back to Kentucky, and there he married Miss Margaret Lenewemper, of Kentucky, who was born in his own country; they were married Sept. 11, 1867; he then gardened at Covington, Ky., for four years, sold out and came here, and has worked the old farm since; their family consists of five children — John, Annie, Rosa, Mary and Emma.

HENRY W. STOCKS, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Eleroy; born in England Jan. 11, 1841; came to America in 1842 with his father, David Stocks, who was a molder in the old country; worked at it in Pennsylvania, and helped start Williams Foundry in Freeport; after landing in New York, they went to Pennsylvania and lived about seven years; they then came to Stephenson Co. and stayed with Martin Murphy; bought this farm and moved on it in 1850; two years after this, when eleven years old, he began to plough, and has been a farmer since; he owns 100 acres, now valued at $40 an acre. In politics, he is a Republican. In 1860, Sept. 2, he married Miss Matilda Reber; they have three children — Rosa A., Charles H. and Cora J. Mr. Stocks enlisted, in February, 1864, in Co. A, 92d I. V. I., and was mustered out in July, 1865; he was in all the engagements from Chattanooga to Atlanta, and with Sherman on his “March to the Sea.” Henry W. also hunts and traps in the winetr; in 1873, he went through Iowa, Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas and Missouri, and got back home in 1874; he has a claim he bought, in 1873, in Kansas.

JOHN W. STOCKS, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Eleroy; born in Holdersburg, Blair Co., Penn., Dec. 22, 1843; his father and family, during his youth, were living at different times in Holdersburg and in Martinsburg, attending to his business — that of molder in the foundry; John W. was going to school at this period of his history. David Stocks bought his farm of three different parties: the first 80 of Badger, the second 80 of Flansburg and a 40 of Justice Coats; and, afterward, two more 80's; they moved to Stephenson Co. in April, 1850, and on to the farm. Mr. Stocks lived in Erin Township for six years, and was School Director while there; is a Republican in principles. Has taught school for six terms, from 1865 to 1866, and then went to school at Mt. Morris in 1866-67, and taught again from 1868 to 1874; he owns 200 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre. In 1871, Feb. 20, he married Miss Susan Wagner, of Northumberland Co., Penn., born Sept. 8, 1849; they have four children — C. May, J. D., M. Ellen and Laura.

JAMES STONEMAN, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Freeport; born June 1, 1842, in the State of Pennsylvania; left home at 8 years of age, and, after spending some two years in Monroe, Wis., came to Stephenson Co., Ill., in April of 1852; he then moved on to his farm of 80 acres, in 1867, and has been busily engaged working it since; its probable value is $25 per acre. He has, though not a married man, held school offices; in politics he is a Republican.

WILLIAM STONEMAN, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Freeport; born in Chenango Co., N. Y., March 18, 1805; moved to Chautauqua Co. in 1828, from there to Wisconsin in 1838, and from Wisconsin to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1844; owns 280 acres, valued at $50 an acre. Politics, Republican from J. Q. Adams' time; he held the office of Assessor of Freeport in 1850. He was married, in 1847. to Miss Melinda Dunham, of Saratoga Co., N. Y.

JOHN H. STOUT, bridge-builder, house-carpenter and farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Damascus; born in Northumberland Co., Penn., Oct. 7, 1818; he can trace his descent from William IV; his grandparents came from Holland to America, locating first in what was then New Amsterdam, and moved to Hopeful, N. J., where his father was born, who learned to be a mechanic; from his father, John H. learned the trade, and worked at it until coming out West; he landed in Chicago May 15, and came to Freeport June 3, 1845, looked up a location and moved his family out; went to work, and, in 1854, was appointed Inspector of Bridges on the I. C. R. R., Northern Division; in the fall of 1855, he came to this farm, expecting to leave in the spring of 1866, but he is there yet; he took a contract for wood of the railroad company, and cut over 1,100 acres and put out 7,000 cords in three months. Mr. Stout owns 100 acres, now valued at $50 an acre. Has held the office of Road Commissioner, and also school offices; is a Democrat, and has been a member of the Baptist Church. In September, 1838, he was married to Miss Catherine Ann Wolf, of Clinton Co., Penn.; they have five children, all married — Mary R., married to James Hubbs; Thomas W., lives in Nebraska; Catherine M., lives in same place, Pawnee Co., Neb.; George B., married Emma Hulroyd, and lives at Corn Grove; Prucilla A., lives in Nebraska. Thomas W. was in the army; belonged to the 92d I. V. I.; one of his sons-in-law was shot in the heel and crippled somewhat.

FREDERIC WATSON, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Freeport; born in Nottinghamshire, England, in 1822; left old England for America when 13 years old; he was in Pennsylvania in the spring of 1843, and took an active part in the campaign of Polk and Clay, and got beat, though not yet old enough to vote; he worked at quarrying stone for old Harvey Bailey, and in the fall of 1845 left Pennsylvania for the West, and the same year pre-empted 80 acres of land in Stephenson Co., Ill.; he owns now 247 acres, worth from $40 to $45 an acre, located on Sees. 26, 27 and 23; he quarried the stone and built the dam in the river at Freeport, also the church building for the United Brethren at Harlem Center, of which he is a member. He has been a Free-Soil man, and also a Popular-Sovereignty man; started with the Whig party; has been an Abolitionist, and is now a Republican. Married in Nottinghamshire, England, in Old Baseford Church, to Miss Eliza Stocks, a native of England; their family consists of fifteen children — Mary, Thomas, William, Haleck, Helen, Fred, Charles, Alice (now deceased), Lizzie, Frank, Burt (also dead), George, Ruth, David and Emma.

MRS. HANNAH L. WILCOXON, widow, Sec. 11; P. O. Freeport; born in Scioto Co., Ohio, July 12, 1817; her maiden name was Hannah L. Wibbs; she was married to Rezin Wilcoxon on her 23d birthday, in 1840; arrived in Stephenson Co. on the 8th of August, same year; William Wilson and family accompanied them; they landed at Peru, and came the rest of the way in wagons; when they got here there were but 12 acres broken, and the saw-mill. Two nieces (daughters of Thomas Wilcoxon, who died in 1824, at New Orleans) were keeping house for Levi before he married Miss Hibbs; the two nieces are living in California — Elizabeth (now Mrs. Sharp) and Harriet (now Mrs. Watrus). At this time Hannah L.'s husband, with his brothers Levi and Thompson, held eighteen 80's in their claim; Mrs. Wilcoxon owns 307 acres, valued at $40 an acre, located on Sees. 3, 10 and 11. Mrs. Rezin Wilcoxon's family numbered six children — Oscar D. (who died in Concord, N. C.; he belonged to the 92d I. V. I, Co. K.), Mary E., Julia N. (now married and living in Ohio), Thermuthis A., George and Rezin ( the last three) and Mary E. live on the home estate.

JOHN WRIGHT, farmer. Sec. 12; P. O. Freeport; born in Union Co., Penn., July 6, 1824; he left there for Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1843, with a party numbering over sixty persons, some of whom are now residing in this county; among others are the Misses Barber, now 80 years of age, and Mrs. Vandyke, over 90 years of age; one of her daughters is now Mrs. O. B. Munn. His party arrived at Freeport on July 4, 1843, and stopped at the main hotel, which stood where the pop factory stands now; here they were met by his brother, Pascal Wright, who had entered land some time before, and paid $1.25 per acre, somewhere about 1838 or 183:3; John went out to this farm, and has been here since; he now owns 185 acres, valued at $55 per acre. He has been Road Commissioner, and has held school offices; is a Republican, and was before the party was organized. He belongs to the Cedarville Presbyterian Church, which was built in 1876; he was Treasurer of the Building Committee; the church was dedicated on Oct. 29, 1876; the first regular minister was L. H. Mitchell. Mr. John Wright married twice; his firsl wife's name was Margaret Ewing — married her in November, 1851; and the second wife, Mary B. Heise, of Columbia, Lancaster Co., Penn.: he married while on a visit to Pennsylvania in 1862, on the 3d of January; he has four children — Emily L., Oliver P., Maggie H., and one dead.

WILLIAM WRIGHT, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Freeport; born in Union Co., Penn., on the 27th Sept., 1820; started with his father, Samuel Wright, and family, from Pennsylvania, in 1843, with a party consisting of fifty-four persons, as follows: John Barber's family, consisting of ten persons; Samuel B. Barber's family, consisting of five persons; James W. Barber's family, consisting of ten persons; John Vandyke and sons' family, consisting of eleven persons; Samuel Wright's family, consisting of five persons; Jacob Gable's family, consisting of six persons; and Robert Badger's family, consisting of seven persons; this party started on the 28th of May and arrived on the 4th of July, 1843, being five and a half weeks on the way; their route took them through Mercer Co.; they crossed the Alleghany River at Franklin, passed up through Warren, Ohio, to Cleveland, and from Lower Sandusky crossed into Adrian, Mich.; in crossing the Maumee, Mrs. Badger had a fit from fright, and died next day; the party passed Janesville, Mich., and Hillsdale to South Bend, Ind., to Michigan City, across the Calumette to Chicago, through Rockford, where the party divided. William Wright's party reached Stephenson Co.; he then settled on his brother Pascal's claim, of which he now owns 104 acres. He has held Town Clerk's office, and is a Republican in politics. He was married in July to Miss E. J. Runner, of Pennsylvania; they have one child — J. Merrill Wright.

WILLIAM L. WRIGHT, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Freeport; born on the farm where he now lives, in the year 1851, Nov. 28; he has worked the estate with his father, Pascal L. Wright, and, since his death, which occurred in 1872, William has farmed it himself; he now owns 195 acres, valued at $50 per acre. In politics he is a Republican, and attends the Presbyterian Church. In 1875, March 11, he married Miss Laura Buckley, of Freeport, Stephenson Co., the ceremony being performed in Shannow, Carroll Co.; they have one child, born Dec. 21, 1878, named John Howard Wright. William's father was one of the party which came out in 1838, the others being Robert Chambers, J. B. Barber, Robert Barber, James Chambers and Jesse Weifcle. Pascal L. was born in Columbia, Lancaster Co., Pa., in 1813, and purchased this claim on the south half of Sec. 12, of William Robey; his family consisted of J. Lawson Wright, a graduate of Normal Ill., and now teaching; a daughter, the oldest married to John Winters, and now in the next county; Jane H. is living with her, while Anna C. is attending school in Oregon, Ogle Co. Ill. Pascal's brothers William and John live on farms adjoining.

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Remarkable Stories, Volume 1
by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a Licensed Massage Therapist and Life Coach. An amateur historian, parts of these stories and many more appear on his website, www.robertbike.com.

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LORAN TOWNSHIP

MRS. ELIZABETH APKER, Sec. 10; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in Lycoming Co., Penn., May 3, 1822; was married to John Apker, Jan. 21, 1845; her maiden name was Elizabeth Farley. Mr. A. was born in York State July 30, 1823; his father moved to Lycoming Co. when he was quite young. Mr. and Mrs. A. moved from Pennsylvania to this county in 1847. Mrs. Apker has a family of eleven children; they are — Louisa, born Jan. 7, 1846; Mary, June 6, 1848; Lottie, Sept. 14, 1849; Henry C, Jan. 22, 1851; Samuel R., Oct. 15, 1852; Mahlon, Aug. 10, 1854; Hattie J., Sept. 24, 1856; David L., June 17, 1858; Alice E., Feb. 19, 1861; Jennie R., July 8, 1863; John, Oct. 27, 1865. Louisa is married to Solomon Kamrar, of Clinton Co., Iowa; Mary is married to Thomas Schaffer, of Freeport; Henry is married, and in Chicago. Mr. A. died of sickness contracted in the army, at Mobile, Ala., in 1865; he enlisted February 8, and died the 8th of May. Mrs. A. owns 86 acres of land. Mr. A. is buried in Mobile Cemetery.

REUBEN BABB, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Freeport; born in Berks Co., Penn., in 1810; he came to this county in 1840, from Lycoming Co., Penn. He was married to Miss Eliza Stall in 1837; she was born in Northumberland Co., Penn., in 1815. Mr. and Mrs. Babb have five children living; they are John, born Feb. 28, 1840; Jane, July 10, 1847; Solomon, Nov. 25, 1851; Aaron, July 26, 1855, and Ephraim, Feb. 5, 1858; those dead are Amanda and Sophia, buried in the Lutheran Cemetery, Loran Township. Mr. Babb has 240 acres of land; he has the family record of the Babb family for many years back, in Germany. Mr. B. was one of the first board appointed by the State Superintendent of Education, to take charge of the schools for this township, which board held office until 1851; he has been in office almost ever since the township organization, until 1872; he was one of the first Road Commissioners for the township, and is one of the oldest settlers living in the township.

H. M. BARNES, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in Oneida Co., N. Y., in 1813, and moved to this county in 1854. Married Miss Louisa Byington, Jan. 28, 1838; she was born in Herkimer Co., N. Y., in 1813; they were married in Camden, Oneida Co., N. Y. Mr. and Mrs. B. have six children; the oldest, George H., died aged 22 years, in the army, and was buried at Savannah, Tenn.; he belonged to the 7th I. V. C.; Harriet, died Oct. 10, 1842, and is buried in Eatonsville Cemetery, Herkimer Co., N. Y.; Adelbert, married, and living in Red Oak, Montgomery Co., Iowa; Jared B., married, and living in the same county; Hattie L., married to Charles F. Scott, of Loran Township; Whiting S., married, and living at home.

JACOB BEHRINGER, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1830; came to this country in 1853, and to this county in April, 1854. Was married to Miss Katharine Karr. in this county, in 1856; she was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1834; Mr. and Mrs. B. have eleven children, seven living and four dead; those living, are Maggie, born in 1861; Lydia, 1863; Emma, 1865; Mary, 1867; Samuel, 1869; David, 1871, and Hannah, in 1873; John is buried in the Dunkard Cemetery, Kent Township, and Susan and two others are buried in the German Cemetery, Loran Township. Mr. B. owns a farm of 105 acres, and has followed farming since he came to this country.

IRA S. BYINGTON, farmer, Sees. 25 and 36; P. O. Freeport; born in Oneida Co., York State, June 9, 1813; came to this county in 1853. Was married to Miss Harriet Barnes May 7, 1835; she was born in Oneida Co., N. Y., April 18, 1815. Mr. and Mrs. Byington have four children living, and three dead; they are Elenora A., born March 14, 1837; Alvin, April 18. 1839; Flora, Oct. 14, 1840; Flora P., March 18, 1844; Harriet Jennie, Jan. 9, 1850; Clara E., April 6, 1853; and Clark I., Dec. 12, 1858; Flora died July 12, 1842— buried in Yorkville Cemetery. Kalamazoo Co., Micb.; Alvin, Oct. 1, 1860, and Elenora A., Nov. 29, 1876, and are buried in the Presbyterian Cemetery, Ridott Township, this county. Mr. B. has been Justice of the Peace nine years, which office he now holds; he has been Commissioner of Highways six years; he has 160 acres of land. Flora P. is now Mrs. Askey, of Montgomery Co., Iowa; Harriet Jennie is Mrs. Robert Hayes, of East Dubuque, Ill.; Clara E. is Mrs. J. Peck, living at home.

JOHN C. DITZLER, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in Northumberland Co., Penn., April 18, 1836; came to this county in 1848. Was married to Miss Sophia Babb in 1863; she was born in this county in 1842; died May 16, 1873, and is buried in the Lutheran Cemetery, Loran Township. Mr. Ditzler was married again to Miss Ida Harrenstein Feb. 26, 1874; she was born in Germany, in 1849; Mr. Ditzler has three children by his first wife — Laura, born April 2, 1865; Cyrus, born April 8, 1867, and Lillie, born Sept. 5, 1870; and three by his second wife — Charles B., born Oct. 20, 1876; John, born March 6, 1878, and George, born Dec. 20, 1879. Mr. Ditzler has 180 acres of land in this township; he has served as School Director and Trustee for three years, and as Township Collector for one year.

MATHIAS J. DITZLER, carpenter and farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Freeport; born in Wurtemberg, Germany, Jan. 28, 1812; came to Pennsylvania about 1815. Was married to Miss Rachel Babb Jan. 18, 1837; she was born in Berks Co., Penn., Oct. 26, 1815.; Mr. and Mrs. Ditzler moved to this county in 1840; they have a family of ten children living and one dead; they are Thomas A., born Oct. 25, 1838; John M., born Dec. 28, 1840; Samuel B., born Jan. 4, 1843; Jacob B., born Oct. 3, 1844; Mary S., born Nov. 11, 1846; Eliza A., born Feb 2, 1849; Hiram, born April 11,1851; Margaret S., born Aug 16, 1853; Amos M., born Sept. 7, 1855; Sarah Jane, born Dec. 28, 1857; Catharine E., born June 15, 1859; Samuel B., died of sickness contracted in the army at Benton Barricks, Mo.; he belonged to Co. I, 13th I. V. I.; is buried in the Lutheran Cemetery, Loran Township; Mrs. Ditzler died Sept. 19, 1863, and is buried in the Lutheran Cemetery; Mr. Ditzler now lives with his son-in-law, J. A. Gheen, who married his fourth daughter, Sarah J., Sept. 29, 1879; he was born in Clinton Co., Penn., May 19, 1856; Mr. Gheen owns 40 acres of land.

ANDREW K. EBY, farmer, Sections 8 and 9; P. O. Yellow Creek; owns 120 acres of land; born in Ogle Co., Ill., Oct. 16, 1850; came to this county in 1853. Was married to Miss Mary E. DeVore, March 17, 1872; she was born in Bedford Co., Penn., March 3, 1851; Mr. and Mrs. Eby have one child — Olive J., born Feb. 3, 1864. Mr. Eby's father and mother were both born in Pennsylvania, and came to this State in 1846; they had a family of nine children, one girl living and one dead, and seven boys; Mr. Eby's father first came to Ogle Co., where he remained four years, then came to this county; in 1870, he and the family, except Andrew, removed to Cedar Co., Neb. Mrs. Eby's father and mother were born in Bedford Co., Penn., and came to this county in 1853. where Mr. DeVore followed farming until his death, in 1872, Feb. 22; he is buried in the German Baptist Cemetery, Loran Township; Mrs. DeVore still survives him; Mr. and Mrs. DeVore had a family of six boys and three girls — two boys dead, one buried with the father, and the other died of sickness in the army at Vicksburg, Miss.; he is buried there.

JAMES C. GRAHAM, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in CeDter Co., Penn., Jan. 25, 1845; came to this State in 1856, and to this county in 1858. He was married to Miss Emma Goodnow Sept. 28, 1876; she was born in Waukesha Co., Wis., Oct. 6, 1855; Mr. and Mrs. Graham have two children — Lyman Woods, born July 2, 1877; George Warren, born Jan. 12. 1879. Mr. Graham's father's family consisted of Mathew, the father, born in Pennsylvania, Feb. 14, 1797; Martha Jane Shannon, the mother, born Dec. 14, 1800; married Jan. 24, 1822; Henry, born Dec. 20, 1823; John, born Oct. 14, 1825; Matthew Woods, born Oct. 16, 1827; George Junkin, born Aug. 4, 1829; Martha Ann, born May 22, 1831; Elizabeth, born April 15, 1834; Jane, born Feb 4, 1836; Samuel S., born Feb. 12, 1838; David F., born April 19, 1840; Ephraim W., born May 31, 1842; James O, born Jan. 25, 1845; those dead are, George J., Mar..h 11, 1853; Martha Ann, July 11, 1853; Elizabeth, Feb. 14, 1848; John S., July 28, 1863; are buried in Bellefonte Cemetery, Center Co., Penn.; David F. was killed at Ft. Donelson, Feb. 15
1862; he belonged to Co. A, 11th I. V. I. The father died Oct. 19, 1872, the mother, March 30, 1875; Ephraim W. died Aug. 31, 1873; Samuel died Jan 31, 1880; are all buried in Freeport Cemetery.

WILLIAM H. HAHN, farmer, Sec 9; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in Northampton Co., Penn., March 22, 1856; came to this county in 1869. Was married to Miss Margaret S. Ditzler, Jan. 5, 1879; she was born Aug. 16, 1853. Mr. H.'s father was born in Pennsylvania, March 11, 1821; came here in 1869; his mother was born Feb. 22, 1822 in Pennsylvania, both living. He has one brother buried in St. Peter's Cemetery. Northampton Co., Penn., and three sisters living, Mary J., Lucy A. and Sarah M.

SAMUEL HART, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in Juniata Co. Penn., May 20, 1825, came to this county in 1857. Was married to Miss Josephine Michler in 1860, she was born in Lancaster Co., Penn., in 1837; Mr. and Mrs. Hart have a family of two children — Parmelia, born Feb. 15, 1862, and George, born Oct. 19, 1860. Mr. Hart followed the pursuit of teaching for several years, both in this State and Ohio, being compelled to quit it on account of bronchial affections; since which time he has followed farming very successfully. Is at present one of the Board of Commissioners of Highways for Loran Township.

JOHN R. HAYES, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Freeport, born in Bellefonte, Center Co., Penn., Feb. 24, 1839; came to this county 1844. Was married to Jane Graham Feb. 20, 1868; she„was born in Northumberland Co., Penn., Feb. 4, 1836; Mr. and Mrs. Hayes have five children living, and one, an infant, buried in Freeport Cemetery; those living are John Graham, born April 30, 1870; Martha Jane, July 15, 1872; Mathew Graham, Nov. 26, 1874; Samuel Hutchinson, May 7, 1876, and Mary Ellen, Jan. 20. 1880. Mr. Hayes enlisted in Co. A, 11th I. V. I., April 16, 1861; discharged, July 31, 1861; re-enlisted on the same day for three years, in the same company; was wounded at Shiloh April 6, 1862, remained in the hospital till Oct. 24, of the same year, when he was discharged from the service; Mr. Hayes again enlisted as veteran in Co. A of the 11th I. V. I., Feb. 6, 1864, was transferred to Co. K, of the 46th I. V. I., and honorably discharged Jan. 20, 1866. He is strongly Republican in politics. Has 168 acres of land.

LEWIS HOUSEL, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in Union Co., Penn., Oct. 23, 1850; came to this county and State in 1851. Was married to Miss Catherine Finkenbinder Sept. 6, 1876; Mrs. Housel was born in Kent Township, this county, April 9, 1857; Mr. and Mrs. Housel have one child, William Henry, born May 26, 1877. Mr. Housel owns 90 acres of land, valued at $4,500.

FREDERICK KIELSMEIR, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Freeport; owns 85 acres of land; born in Germany, Doc. 23, 1840; came to this country in 1867; was married to Miss Louisa llartmeir, Sept. 12, 1869; she was born in Germany, May 27, 1840. The family are Louisa, born Aug. 19, 1870; Freddie, April 24, 1872; Henry, May, 9, 1874; Lydia, March 24, 1876; Minnie, Dec. 29, 1877, and Wilhelm; Nov. 27, 1879. Mr. K. lived in Ogle Co., Ill., eight years, and five years in this county; is a member of the Evangelical Church.

IRA KINMAN, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in Union Co., Penn., Nov. 25, 1825; settled in Jo Daviess Co., in 1856; removed from thereto Kent Township, in 1857, and to Freeport, in 1858, where he followed mechanical and inventive business, for eight years; since which time he has followed farming in Loran Township. He was married to Miss Mary A. Yohn April 26, 1852; Mrs. K. was born in Union Co., Penn., Sept. 24, 1832. Mr. and Mrs. K. have ten children living, and two dead; those living, are — Emma, born Oct. 16, 1853; John, Dec. 20, 1854; Julia A., Oct. 14, 1856; Dora, June 12, 1858; Mary, June 1, 1859; Maggie, Oct. 27,1860; George, Nov. 24, 1861; Sarah, Aug. 17, 1866; Daniel, Sept. 3, 1869; Minnetta, May 3, 1877, and Maretta and Ira, who are buried in Freeport Cemetery. Mr. K. is the inventor of ' Kinman's Patent Measuriug Faucet,” also a Patent Gate fastening, and other very useful articles; has been School Trustee for six years; owns 159 acres of land. Maretta was born June 5, 1863, died Aug. 13, 1863; Ira, was born April 13, 1872, died Oct. 24, 1872.

DR. G. S. KLECKNER, Postmaster, and dealer in dry goods, groceries and notions, Yellow Creek; born in Union Co., Penn., in 1835; came to Stephenson Co. in 1860. Married Miss Susan B. Peters, of Milan, Erie Co., Ohio, in 1867; she was born in Union Co., Penn., in 1847. Mr. and Mrs. K. have two children — Malburn M., aged 9 years, and Edith C, aged 22 months. Mr. Klecknor served in the army, in Co. D, 93d I. V. I., as 2d Lieutenant, from 1862 to 1863; as Captain of the company from 1863 to 1865; honorably discharged. Has served for five years consecutively as Supervisor of Loran Township, which office he now holds; is President of Loran Township Mutual Insurance Company.,

CHARLES KLOEPPING, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Freeport; was born in Germany Sept. 7, 1822; came to this country May 6, 1854. Was married to Miss Caroline Vimmar in 1854; she was born in Germany, in 1824; they have a family of five children living, and one buried in Freeport Cemetery; those living are — Emma, born July 13, 1855; Mary, Nov. 16, 1856; Caroline, Dec. 13, 1860; Lizzie, Dec. 4, 1862; Charles, July 2, 1864. Mr. K. was three years School Director, and owns 205 acres of land; Emma is now Mrs. Kampmier, and Caroline is Mrs. Charles Kuhlemier.

D. C. LAMB, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in Vigo Co., Ind., Sept. 16, 1836; came to this county and State in 1842. Was married to Miss Julia A. Calhoun, March 22, 1860; she was born in Bedford Co., Penn., May 6, 1844. Mr. and Mrs. Lamb have seven children living and three dead; those living are Emma C, born May 5, 1861; Jessie A., born July 16, 1862; Dora C, born Feb. 10, 1864; John W., born Oct. 3, 1866; Leslie L., boin March 24, 1869; Hardie C., born Feb. 20, 1873; two infants born Aug. 12, 1875; Daisy E., born Oct. 12, 1876; Emery S., born Oct, 27, 1879; Hardie C, died Sept. 12, 1877, and the two infants died Aug. 12, 1875; they are buried in the Evangelical Church Cemetery, Loran Township. Mr. L. owns 264] acres of land. He enlisted Nov. 21, 1863; mustered out Aug. 31, 1865; served under Gen. Reynolds, of the trans- Mississippi Department, in Arkansas, Co. I, 13th I. V. C.

WILLIAM LAHRE, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in Union Co., Penn., Aug. 22, 1830; came to this county in 1845. Was married to Miss Matilda Thomas in 1854; she was born ill Sandusky, Ohio, Oct. 7, 1833; Mr and Mrs. Lahre have ei^ht children living and one dead; those living are Sarah M.. born Jan. 7, 1855; Esther Louisa, boin Oct. 28, 1856; James M., born April 4, 1860; William K., born March 4, 1863; Isaac E., born July 5, 1865; Alice A., born Oct. 25, 1867; Harvey A., born July 12, 1870; Josephine, born June 14, 1875, and Emma L., born Aug. 22, 1858; died Jan. 22, 1859; is buried in Phillips Cemetery. Jefferson Township. Mr. L. was the first Tax Collector for Jefferson Township, which office he held for six years; was Commissioner of Highways for Loran Township for three years, and Assessor for eight years, which office he now holds; has 185 acres of land. Mr. Lahre's father came to this county in 1845; was born in Lehigh Co., Penn., in 1807; his mother was born in 1808; they have a family of six children living, besides William, viz., Elias, born Sept. 10, 1849; John, born Sept. 30, 1837; Isaac, born Oct. 31, 1846; Sarah, born April 4, 1844; Matilda, born June 15, 1829, and Susan, born Feb. 28, 1833, and five dead — Abram, David, Henry E., Mary and James.

IRA LOWRY, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Freeport; born in Centre Co., Penn., April 5, 1839; came to this county in 1846; engaged in farming and teaching school; went to Iowa in 1867; returned in 1869; followed his profession until 1869, when he settled down to farming. He was married to Miss Sarah Heitter Nov. 26, 1865; she was born in Pennsylvania Feb. 22, 1833; Mr. and Mrs. Lowry have one child — Anna C, born April 21, 1871. He has 80 acres of land, valued at $3,200.

AMOS W. McCREARY (deceased); born in Adams Co., Penn., 1808; moved to Wisconsin 1839; came to this county in 1844. Was married to Miss Mary Babb Jan. 1, 1845; she was born in Northumberland Co., Penn.; moved from Lycoming Co., Penn., July 17, 1840, to this county. Mr. and Mrs. McCreary have one child, Samuel B., born Nov. 10, 1845. Mr. McCreary died in 1846; is buried in the Lutheran Cemetery, Loran Township. Mrs. McCreary's father and mother were both born in the same year, 1784, and both died in the same year, 1861; they moved from Pennsylvania in 1840; they were among the earliest settlers of the county; they are both buried in the Lutheran Cemetery, Loran Township. Mrs. McCreary owns 180 acres of land.

PHILLIP MILLER, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Freeport; born in Freeport April 16, 1857; attended school until 1871, when be commenced farming; has had two narrow chances of losing his life, once by a blow from a singletree, which slipped from its place, and struck him; and second, by foul air inhaled upon going down into a well. He deserves great credit for his endurance and pluck.

IRA MITCHELL, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in Vigo Co., Ind., Aug. 27, 1836; came to this county September, 1839. Was married to Miss Amanda K. Bell Dec. 25, 1865; she was born in Maryland in 1842. Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell have three children living — Charles B, born Sept. 9, 1869; Angelia and Angelina, Aug. 29, 1873; and one buried in the Methodist Church Cemetery, Florence Township. Mr. Mitchell enlisted in Co. B, 71st I. V. I., July 11, 1862; mustered out Oct. 29, 1862. Mr. Mitchell is among the oldest settlers of the township; was Postmaster for eight years at Waterman's Mills.

LEVI W. SHEFFEY, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in Chester Co., Penn., May 29, 1828; moved to Lycoming Co. and lived there four years; came to this county in 1855. Was married to Miss Catharine Bruner in 1854; she was born in Northumberland Co., Penn., 1824. Mr. and Mrs. Sheffey have one child, Mary Agnes, buried in Freeport Cemetery in 1856, aged 6 months; two living — William Lawrence, born Aug. 8, 1859; and Susan Emma, July 29, 1862. Mr. Sheffey enlisted in Co. K, 46th I. V. I., Jan 27, 1865; mustered out at Baton Rouge Jan. 20, 1866; received his final discharge at Springfield, HI., February, 1866. Owns 118 acres of land.

JACOB S. STUDEBAKER, Sec. 17; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in Bedford Co., Penn., 1814; came to Stephenson Co. 15th November, 1856. Was married to Miss Maria Wirtz Oct. 16, 1836; she was born in Bedford Co., Penn., April 13, 1819; died Jan. 22, 1872, and is buried in Yellow Creek Cemetery. Their children are as follows: John, born July 22, 1837; Mary, Dec. 10, 1838; Samuel, July 6, 1840; Henry, March 19, 1872; George E., April 22, 1844: Catharine, March 6, 1846; Simon, Nov. 1, 1847; Hannah, Feb. 1, 1849; Levi, Dec. 27, 1850; Ann Maria, Oct. 14, 1852; infant, April 23, 1854; Ellen, Dec. 22, 1855; Sarah, May 27, 1858; Jacob, June 10, 1862; John, infant and Ann Maria are buried in Miiligan's Cove, Bedford Co., Penn.; John died Aug. 25, 1838; Ann Maria, April 18, 1853; and the infant, April 26, 1854; Mary died May 23, 1866, and is buried in Keokuk, Iowa; Henry, Oct 12, 1864, buried in Arkansas; Sarah and Jacob are buried in Yellow Creek Cemetery; Sarah died April 1, 1874; Jacob, Aug. 13, 1863. Mr. Studebaker was married to Mrs. Catharine Finkenbinder Oct. 26, 1872; Mrs. Finkenbinder was married to William Finkenbinder Aug. 16, 1843, in Summit Co., Ohio; she was born in Hanover, Northampton Co., Penn., June 16, 1824. Mr. and Mrs. F. moved to this county in 1849; Mr. F. was born Dec. 4, 1819, in Frankfort, Cumberland Co., Penn.; their children are Mary, born Nov. 23, 1844; George, Aug. 1, 1846; Fianna, June 22, 1848; David, July 31, 1850; Michael, Dec. 21, 1852; William, Feb. 2, 1855; Catharine, April 9, 1857; Emma, Jan. 2, 1859; Henry. Sept. 1, 1860; Adda, Sept. 2, 1864; Elk Zeborah, Sept. 11, 1866; Henry died Nov. 9, 1867; Fianna, Dec. 9, 1867; and the father, William, died Jan. 4, 1869. Mr. and Mrs. F. came to this county with a capital of 6 cents, but by industry, coupled with an upright character, succeeded in aci/umulating 500 acres of valuable land in the course of twenty years.

JOHN THOMAS, farmer; P. O. Yellow Creek; son of Levi and Elizabeth Thomas; born in this county April 18, 1861. His father was born in Pennsylvania Aug. 27, 1825, and came to this county in 1847; his mother was born in Pennsylvania March 1, 1836; he has ten brothers and sisters; they are Mary E., born Jan. 7, 1853; Jacob L., Feb. 20. 1855; Eliza Jane, July 22, 1856: George F., March 30, 1858; William H., Dec. 20, 1859; Samuel, May 16, 1862; Anna Catharine, Sept. 16, 1864; Matilda, Sept. 8, 1866; Charles, Jan. 27, 1868; and Adam, July 12, 1872. Mr. Thomas died Dec. 3, 1873, and is buried in Hamilton Co., Nebraska.

HARVEY M. TIMMS, Sec. 15; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in Kent Township, Stephenson Co., Ill., May 26, 1837. Married Miss Martha Davis, Jan. 1, 1866; she was born in Lee Co., Ill., Nov. 17, 1845. Mr. and Mrs. Titnrns have four children — Eugene D. and Edna D., aged 12 years; Emma, 7 years; and Gertrude May, 3 years. Mr. Timms enlisted in Co. A, 92d I. V. I., the 5th of August, 1862, appointed to 1st Lieutenant upon the organization of company, promoted to captaincy Dec. 25, 1862, served as such until June, 1865, when the company and regiment were mustered out; Mr. T. was retained to the command of recruits and assigned to the 65th I. V. I., Co. I, and in July was promoted to Major, which office he held until the regiment was mustered out; Mr. T. was in action in the battles of Franklin, Tenn.; Shelbyville, Mission Ridge, Resaca, Kilpatrick's raid, Lovejoy Station, Jonesboro, Triune, Tenn., Chickamauga, Tunnel Hill, Altoona, Sherman's march to the sea, Aiken, S. C, Bentonville, Savannah, Averysboro, Johnston's surrender, siege of Atlanta, Powder Springs.

FREDERICK WAGNER, mechanic and farmer, Sec. 22; P.O. Yellow Creek; born in Sondershausen, Germany, Nov. 10, 1844; came to Freeport, Sept. 22, 1862, and worked at the mechanical business until 1871, when he moved on the farm where he now lives; has 80 acres of land. Was married to Miss Martha Kruydl, June 29, 1868; she was born in Philadelphia, Penn., June 19, 1847; Mr. and Mrs. Wagner have four children living; they are Elizabeth, born April 1,1869; John, April 28, 1870; Minnie, Dec. 29, 1873; Frederick, Oct. 15, 1877. Mr. Wagner is at present School Director of District No. 4, Loran Township.

CHARLES WATERMAN, Sees. 13 and 14; P. O. Waterman's Mills; is a native of Herkimer Co., N. Y., and was born Nov. 14, 1817; after reaching manhood he came West to Illinois; he and his brother, James S. Waterman, the banker of Sycamore, DeKalb Co., laid out that town in 1838; they were among the earliest settlers of DeKalb Co.; he built the mill at Newburg; it was the first mill built north of the Illinois River except one at Aurora. Mr. Waterman was prominent in ridding that section of the country of the notorious band of horse thieves, the “Driscoll Brothers,” who caused so much trouble at that early day. Bill Driscoll had sworn he would kill Mr. W.; soon after, the latter overtook Driscoll on the road on horseback, both were heavily armed; they rode together some miles, Mr. W. watching Driscoll closely, and was ready to shoot him instantly if any attempt was made to attack him; while they were thus on the road, a body of settlers came upon Driscoll; he was taken and hanged within a few hours during the same day. Mr. Waterman came to Stephenson Co. in May, 1840. In 1844, he built a store on Galena street, and engaged in mercantile business; he afterward engaged iu business in Loran Township; established mills here and a large steam distillery. Mr. Waterman was very active and spent a great deal of money to aid the railroads in coming through this county; he and his son have a large stock farm. Mr. Waterman married Miss Eliza Barrett, a native of Vermont; her parents were among the earliest settlers in Winnebago Co. Mr. and Mrs. Waterman have one son — Waldo D., who manages the farm.

WALDO D. WATERMAN, farmer, Secs. 13 and 14; P. O. Freeport; born in this county, April 22, 1856. He was married May 28, 1879, to Miss Emma C. Lamb; she was born in this county. May 5, 1861. Mr. W. owns 280 acres of land.

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Remarkable Stories, Volume 1
by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a Licensed Massage Therapist and Life Coach. An amateur historian, parts of these stories and many more appear on his website, www.robertbike.com.

Buy now! Only 99 cents to download in .pdf format!

Want a paperback? List price $14.99, now only $11.99!

 

JEFFERSON TOWNSHIP

ROBERT BAKER, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Yellow Creek; born Aug. 23, 1815, in Yorkshire, Eng.; in 1830, he came to Canada; here he learned the carpenter trade, and has followed it about forty years; in 1860, he came to Stephenson Co.; they own 240 acres of land. He married Margaret Muir in 1840; she was born in Ireland; they have six children — three sons and three daughters; his son Albert enlisted in 64th, Co. M, 8th I. V. C. served one year.

PHILLIPP BEHRINGER, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Loran; his father and mother were both born in Wurtemberg, Germany, 1824, and he came to this country 1864; they were married in 1847. Mr. B. has five sisters; they are Hannah, now Mrs. Figi, aged 33; Dora, now Mrs. Kiester; aged 31; Christina, now Mrs. Backer, aged 26; Rachel, aged 19, and Katrina, aged 17, all living. Two of the family are buried in Germany, and one in Loran Township. Mr. B. was born in 1852; his father's name is Christian, and his mother's Magdalena Ricker.

E. L. BEST, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Loran; born Dec. 10, 1844, in Clinton Co., Penn.; in 1861, they came to Stephenson Co.; his father died in 1876, aged 63 years; they own 92 acres of land.

ISAAC BOGENREIF, farmer. Sec. 1; P. O. Yellow Creek; born Jan. 19, 1840, in Union Co., Penn.; in 1844, he came with his parents to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived. He owns 200 acres of land. He enlisted in February, 1865. in Co. E, 7th I. V. C, and served to the end of the war. Has been School Commissioner; he is also Justice of the Peace, and has held this office for the past eight years. Married Catharine Wingert in 1862; she was born in Union Co., Penn.; they have nine children — three sons and six daughters.

JOHN S. BOOP, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Yellow Creek; born Dec. 28, 1842, in Union Co., Penn.; in 1858, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 109 acres of land. Enlisted in 1865, in Co. C, 7th Ill. V. C, and served to the end of the war. Married Sarah C. Bottarf, in 1866; she was born in Stephenson Co.; they have three children — Laura M., Mary E. and Frank S.; lost Willie in infancy.

CHARLES FLICKLINGER, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Loran; born Dec. 14, 1818, in Union Co., Penn.; in 1843, he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; he owns 175 acres of land; when in Pennsylvania, he learned the tanning trade, and worked at this business till coming West. He married Mrs. Sank, March 23, 1855; she was born in Germany; have two children — Aaron C. and Lydia A.; she has two children by a former marriage — Louisa and Charlotte.

S. A. FREY, Postmaster and general merchandise, Loran; born Jan. 6, 1836, in Juniata Co., Penn.; in 1850, he came with his parents to Stephenson Co.; in 1864, he opened a grocery at Yellow Creek, continued this two years; he then removed to Loran and commenced his present business; he was appointed Postmaster in 1867; he has been School Treasurer the past ten years; has been eight years Township Supervisor, and ten years Justice of the Peace. Married Aim M. Higley, in 1858; she was born in New York; have four children — Flora L, now Mrs. Dr. Knoll, Lillie E., George D. and Daisey.

SAMUEL HAYES, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Yellow Creek; born Dec. 15, 1804, in Northumberland Co., Penn.; in 1844, he removed to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; he owns 183 acres of land; he learned the tanner's trade in Pennsylvania, and followed it there about twelve years. He married Mary Hutchinson in 1836; she was born in 1806, in Columbia Co., Penn.; they have six children — five sons and one daughter; his sons, John, Russell, Samuel and Robert, served in the late war.

PETER KERCH, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Loran; born March 1, 1817, in Germany; in 1846, he came to New York City; in 1848, he removed to Pittsburgh, Penn.; in 1855, he came to his present farm; he owns 187j acres of land. He married Mena Oman in 1843; she was born in Germauy; they have six children — Jacob, John, Albert, Kate, Mary and Anna.

JOHN KOCH, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in Wurtemberg, Germany, Aug. 13, 1843; came to this county in 1854. He was married to Miss Katharine Flickinger in 1869; she was born in Stephenson Co. June 24, 1850; Mr. and Mrs. Koch have six children — John William, born Dec. 1, 1869; Mary Ann, May 12,1871; Charles, Aug. 24, 1873; Edward, July 23, 1875; Samuel, June, 1876; Peter, March 17, 1879. Samuel died Sept. 10, 1878, and Peter died March 25, 1879; they are buried in the Loran Cemetery of the German Reformed Church. Mr. Koch enlisted, Feb. 22, 1865, in Co. H, 15th I. V. I., and was mustered out at Leavenworth, Kan., Sept. 30, 1865. He has been School Director for three terms, Constable for three years and Commissioner of Highways three years; he owns 114 acres of land.

DR. W. F. KNOLL, physician and surgeon, Loran; born Aug. 24, 1851, in Jefferson Township; at about the age of 25, he commenced studying medicine with Dr. R. F. Hayes, of Freeport, and graduated in the class of 1878-79, at the Chicago Homoeopathic College; he then came to Loran and commenced practicing. He married Miss Flora I. Frey Oct. 5, 1879; she was born in Kent Township.

JACOB OFFENHISER, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Loran; born Sept. 27, 1848, in Wurtemberg, Germany; in 1869, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 120 acres of land. He married Anna Kerch in 1874; she was born in Freeport; they have two children — Nathan E. and Ira Austin.

SIMON SCHESTER, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Loran; born Oct. 19, 1819, in Germany; in 1848, he came to New York City, thence to Chicago, and, in the fall of this year, he went to Beardstown, Ill.; remained here till 1866, when he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 80 acres of land. He married Carolina Swetman in 1860; she was born in Germany; they have four children — one son and three daughters.

SIMON F. TOLLMEIER, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Loran; born May 18, 1839, in Germany; in 1857, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 224 acres of land, with improvements equal to, if not the best, in the township; he is a Director of the Mutual Fire Insurance Co. of Loran. He married Caroline Gearke in 1871; she was born in Jefferson Township; they have three children — Eddie, Louisa and Lydia; he has four children by a former marriage — Mary, Fred, and Rachel and Maggie, twins.

All sales go to help support this website.

Remarkable Stories, Volume 1
by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a Licensed Massage Therapist and Life Coach. An amateur historian, parts of these stories and many more appear on his website, www.robertbike.com.

Buy now! Only 99 cents to download in .pdf format!

Want a paperback? List price $14.99, now only $11.99!

 

ERIN TOWNSHIP

GEORGE M. ALVORD, telegraph operator, express agent and station agent, Eleroy; born in Tonica, Ill., Sept. 29, 1857; his father fell in the capture of Fort Donelson; his mother now resides at Minonk, Woodford Co., Ill., her present name being Morris, having married Mr. L. R. Morris; the Alvord family consisted of three boys — Leroy, a farmer; George M., here in Eleroy, and Charles, also a farmer; George M.went to school in Winona in 1863, and from there went to Minonk, Ill., and at' ended public school until 1874; he then acted as clerk in the Minonk Post Office to the time he went to commercial college in 1875, at Peoria; on leaving there he entered his uncle's grocery, and in 1876 was engaged and sent to the Centennial by several Chicago houses as general advertising agent; he returned and attended normal school in Indiana; having learned telegraphy in 1873 with the Western Union Telegraph Co., he, in 1878, was employed by the I. C. R. R., and is now occupying the above-named positions. In politics, George M. is a Democrat.

G. D. BABBITT, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Eleroy; born in Goshen, Hampshire Co., Mass., Aug. 20, 1799; his father was born in Maine, and belonged to the Presbyterian ministry; the family moved to Otsego Co., N. Y., when Mr. Babbit was 3 years old; his father engaged in farming, together with his brother; his father and mother died the same year, in 1836. G. D. Babbit, left Otsego Co. and went to Susquehanna Co. in 1820, where he learned his trade — tinning — of Mr. Gibson; went to Pike, Allegheny Co., and here, in the year 1825, married Liddie Johnson, of Vermont; had a family of five children — Joshua, Isaac, Abbie J., Harvey C. and Calvin W.; he farmed in Centerville five years; went to Lewiston, Niagara Co.; he then crossed into Canada; came down to Detroit, Mich., farmed five years in Branch Co.. Mich.; went then to Ogle Co., Ill.; from there to Sugar River, Winnebago Co., and came here in 1840, and squatted on Sec. 13, on a farm of 96 acres. Politics, Republican. Married to his second wife, Miss Mary Ann Flynn, in September, 1869; his son, Calvin W., belonged to the 92d I. V. I.; came home in 1865 all right.

A. BACON, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Eleroy; born in Hamilton, Oswego Co., N. Y., Sept. 6, 1812; his father, Nastiel Bacon, died when 65, years of age, having had a family of nine children — Frederick, 76 years of age, died in Ripon, Wis.; Hudson, aged 72, died in Green Bay, Wis.; Peter, aged 75, is living in Indiana; Eunice B., aged 73, died in Ripon, Wis.; Caroline S., aged 72, lives at Union Grove, Wis.; Sally died is Michigan; Polly died iu New York. A. Bacon, the subject of this sketch, lives here on the farm, aged 68; James died at Palmyra, N. Y.; Lucius died "aged 23. A. Bacon lived at home until 1829, engaged in farming; he then walked into Cattaraugus Co. and bought a farm of 80 acres; stayed ten years and cleared fifty acres; about this time, in September, 1 83 1, he married Miss Dorcas L. Stebbins, of New York; they had three children — Philo S., Lucinda and Mary; his wife died in Kenosha in 1840; he had contracted the rheumatism, and was obliged to sell his farm, and for eight years he could not walk, and has never entirely recovered; after selling, he went home to Hannibal and stayed there, an invalid; getting better, he took a claim of 160 acres, but was not able to work, so got 60 acres, and finally sold it; came here in March. 1S46. and settled on Sec. 13; owns now 104 acres, valued at $50 per acre; he worked tlyve years; his lameness not letting him work, he went to making window-sash; at this he made money, and when the railroad came through, he bossed the hands and made good wages; in 1855, he went into the mercantile business, buying out George Andrews, of Eleroy; first year made $1,000 clear; after carrying on the business nine years, sold on account of bad health and retired. Mr. Bacon is a Democrat, and served as Justice of the Peace fourteen years. Supervisor nine years in succession, and Assessor one year. In 1841, he married Elizabeth Clark; they had two children — Lansing, in Dakota now, and Frederick, a traveling man.

CHARLES BOEKE, farmer and carpenter, Sec. 15; P. O. Eleroy; born in Germany June 27, 1826; came to this country in 1854, and lived with his brother in Waddams Township, Stephenson Co., Ill.; his father's family consisted of eight children — Louisa and Herman, both decease 1; George, Charles, Francis, now dead; William was killed in the army; Wilhemina lives in Wisconsin, and Caroline (now Mrs. Brigna); after living at Waddams ten years, Charles moved to his present home in 1864; ho owns 90 acres of land, valued at 850 an acre. In politics he is a Democrat, and belongs to the Lutheran Church, at Lena. In September, 1364, he married Miss Wilhelmina Meiser, of Germany; they had five children — Charles is the only one alive. He married again in 1864, and his second wife's family consisted of Henry, Mina, Louisa, Frederick, Sophia, Charles, Paulina, Herman and William.

MRS. MARY E. BOEKE, widow, Sec. 3; P. O. Lena; Francis Boeke, her husband, was born in Germany, June 27, 1827; served as a soldier in the fatherland for five years; came from Chicago here in 1850, and engaged in making brick. Pec. 26, 1860, he married Mary E. Hammond, now his widow; he bought this home for his family, where they now live. Mr. Boeke enlisted in 1863, in the 14th, I. V. I. Co. I, as Lieutenant, and on May 25, 1864, was promoted to captaincy; he came home in August, 1865, and, his health being shattered, he died Dec. 31, 1874, leaving her a life pension and the property of 10 acres of land and a fine residence. Mrs. Boeke has six children — John F., now in Kansas, Visente A., Edna E., Willie D., George A. and Lotta E.

NATHANIEL J. CHURCHILL, Eleroy; born in Wasco, Cayuga Co., N. Y., March 3, 1823; here during the early years of his life he went to school, and later learned carriage painting; at this trade he worked as he traveled from place to place; he served his apprenticeship with Hall & Porter, Skaneateles; went to Auburn and worked under instructions at ornamental work; he traveled through Genoa, Kelicksville, Truxton, Cortland Co., De Ruyter, De Granville, to Grneva, then to Havana, Ithaca, Towano, Bradford, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh to Boston, New York City and Newark, then to Moravia, Cayugo Co., where he attended school in 1842; went to Wisconsin but came back and attended school in 1844, then went away again, to Pike Lake. Washington Co., where he bought 160 acres of land, and in September, 1844, he married Miss Ascenette Denure, of Canada; by this marriage she had four children, only two now alive; soon after he sold out and moved into Stephenson Co., Ill., and settled on the old Helms farm, Sec. 19; in 1852, he sold this farm to Alfred Dan and went to railroading; then started for St. Louis and on to the Sioux Biver, through Nebraska to the Ishabotany and back again, locating a mile south of Beloit, in Winnebago Co., Ill.; he was engaged on the I. C. B. B. till 1855, and after this returned to his trade, for awhile working for Clapp & Co., in Freeport; he then was engaged by Leightheart, Meigs & Philips, as foreman of the railroad constructing corps; about this time he purchased his present home in Eleroy; in the year 1857, went back to his trade again till 1861, where hft was engaged on the Freeport & Savannah B. R, and worked up till 1866. Dec. 5, 1865, he married a second time, to a Miss Johanna A. Alberts, of Utrecht, Holland, and has a family of four children — Frank H., Nathan J., Henry A. and Erl. Mr. Churchill is a Bepublican and has served as Justice of the Peace since 1871, in the town of Erin; two of his sons were soldiers in the Union army; George enrolled in the 92d I. V. I., Co. A, and Scott enlisted when only 15 years of age.

DR. F. A. DARLING, Eleroy; born in Spafford. Onondaga Co., N. Y., April 10, 1832; received his preparatory reading under Dr. Kneeland, of Livingston Co.; when through there he attended lectures in Geneva, N. Y., and in 1856 received his certificate of Geneva College, David Hall, President; after leaving there he went to Michigan, and right on to Eleroy, where he stayed, and has since established himself in a very fine practice; no orher physician but Dr. Shepherd having been here; the Dr. farms some, and in 1864 enlisted as 1st Lieutenant in the 142d I. V. I.; he came home and went out again as Captain in the 147th I. V. I., and finally came back in 1866; he has held township offices, and is a Bepublican. In 1862, he married Miss C. J. Putnam, of Warren, Jo Daviess Co., Ill.; they have one boy — D. J. W.; his mother, now 79 years of age, is living with him.

CONRAD FAUTZMEIER, farmer and mason. Sec. 27; P. O. Eleroy: born in Germany Jan. 10, 1817; he left his native land in 1854, for the shores of America, where he landed, and proceeded at once to Freeport; before this time he had learned the trade of stonemason; finding here plenty of work, settled down, and by economy and perseverance amassed enough to purchase his farm on Sec. 27, of A. Vansloter, embracing 120 acres; this was in 1873. He had, in 1847, married Miss Catharine Slater; his first family was Christian, Sophia, Conrad, Mary, Anna, Lidia, George, Frederick. In 1865, he married again, Miss Charlotte Picking; this family consisted of three — Caroline, Charles and Mina.

ADAM FINKBINDER, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Eleroy; born in Germany in August 1850, and is one of a family of twelve children — Jacob, Rose and Dorothea, in Germany; Adam and Mary here on the farm; Gotleib, Agnes and Caroline, at Hickory Grove; Richlain, Christopher and George in Kansas, and Lena, now Mrs. Mathias. When Adam was in the old country, he was engaged in various occupations, is an A 1 hand in the flax factory; he now farms 80 acres of fine land; his father is now 66 years of age, and his mother 65; her name was Rosina A. Bernhardt. Adam is a Republican in politics.

CONRAD FYE, farmer and carpenter, Eleroy; born in Bedford Co., Penn., on Aug. 2, 1800; his father moved to Cambria Co., in 1805, and there during the winter lost all their animals; but they persevered and made a home there in the woods. In 1824, March 24, he married Miss Temperance Plummer; they had two children — Susanna and Jacob; he helped clear his father's timber land, with the promise of 100 acres, but, being taken ill, giving up hopes of recovering, his father reclaimed his son Conrad's farm, who on recovering his health moved to Stephenson Co., in 1846, and rented a farm of Tom Gatliff, for two years, and bought 160 acres on Sec. 1, Loran Township; lived there 27 years, then moved to his present home in Eleroy. He married Miss Sarah Rumbarger, of Pennsylvania, Feb. 13, 1834; their children were, Elizabeth, now Mrs. Rees; John, deceased; Josiah, in Nebraska; Benjamin, Daniel, David, Lewis, Sarah, Jeremiah, Jerome. He is a Republican, and belongs to the United Brethren in Christ Church, Eleroy.

VALENTINE GILMAN, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Eleroy: born in Union Co., Penn., Aug. 7, 1829; his father, Daniel Gilman, brought his family to Stephenson Co. in 1840; they were Elizabeth, Phoebe (now Mrs. Strong), Jacob (deceased), Catharine (now Mrs. Rosenstiel); Valentine, the subject of this sketch, living on the old homestead, where some of the old buildings still stand; Andrew, living in Eleroy; Ellen, in Kent; Esther, a widow, in Lanark. Daniel died in 1857, and his wife in 1853; they were natives of Pennsylvania. Valentine, at the age of 22, went on to an 80 acre farm of his own, and in 1855, March 15, married Miss Elmira Ruthrauff, of Pennsylvania; the ceremony took place in Eleroy; they have a family of seven children — Alta V., now Mrs. F. Jones; Emma I., married Rev. Rowel Harwood. M. E. minister in Orangeville. Mr. Gilman is a Republican, and belongs to the M. E. Church at Lena. He now owns 210 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre. Mrs. Gilman's mother is now living with her at the advanced age of 73.

CHARLES GOSSMANN, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Eleroy; born in 1840; came to America in 1842, with his father's family of three children — Charles, Louisa, and Hermena; his father was married again to Wilhemina Henke, and his second family was Henry, William, Matilda, Paulina, Edward, Anna and Amelia; his second marriage was in 1847; he is now living, aged 66. This family was one of the first to leave for America from that part of Germany, and, on arriving in Stephenson Co., settled on a rented place near Bobbtown, afterward on Sec. 12, Erin, and finally bought on Sec. 1. Charles farmed until 1862, when he enlisted in the 92d I. V. I., Co. A; he came out of the army with impaired health. In 1866, he married Miss Louisa Miller, of Germany; they had one child — Alfred. He was married again in 1870, Feb. 14, to Miss Mary Lesemann, and had a family of five — Josephine, Alvine, Flora, Daniel and Menetta. Mr. Charles Gossmann has been Commissioner and Assessor. He is a Republican, and belongs to the United Evangelical Church of Erin; he bought his farm on Sec. 11, of 102 acres, in 1872, and has not had a failure of a single crop.

L. M. GRIGSBY, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Lena; born in Kentucky April 20, 1820. Aaron, his father, was born in Virginia, came to Kentucky, and finally moved into Indiana, from there to Edgar Co., Ill., in 1829; then to Iroquois in 1835; he left and came to Stephenson Co. in the spring of 1836; of the family, there was William, killed at Prairie Grove, Ark.; Matilda, deceased; Lewis M., living on the homestead; Nancy, now Mrs. DeGraff; Jeremiah, and Aaron, Jr., now in Kansas. Lewis M. struck out fur himself when 18 years old, and in 1839 or 1840, plowed where part of the city of Freeport now stands. In coming to the county in 1836, he met with an accident; one of the wagon-wheels run over his leg; if not for this, he could have jumped over the only house in Freeport, it was so small. There was Mr. Denyos and another family by the name of Bloss, accompanied them to Freeport; those parties went over the river, while the Grigsbys passed upon this side; saw Preston's cabin, and Martin's, and settled on a school section, and had to move when his father took one on Sec. 36, in Waddams. on which he died in 1860. In 1840, Lewis M. rafted lumber down the river, and had, in' 1835, brought a boat down with 100,000 pounds of lead on board, from Hamilton's diggings, in Wisconsin. In 1843, he married Miss Harriet Pickard, who died in 1849, leaving one child, Sarah J., now in Kansas; he remained in Waddams until 1846, and then moved to Sec. 1, Erie; he owns 260 acres; he ha3 been Justice of the Peace, and held other township offices. He is a Republican; was Abolition in 1841, on the principle that slavery should be confined within certain limits. He belongs to the M. E. Church. In 1852, March 10, he married Miss Livina M. Chaddock, of Genesee Co., N. Y; the children are Frank, Harriet M., William S. and Lewis A. Frank is married and now in Waddams; Hattie married, and is now at Mt. Morris.

HOFF BROTHERS, merchants, Eleroy; their father has been engaged in mercantile pursuits since coming with his family to Stephenson Co., Ill., and John and Charles have grown right up in the business, and since coming to the county in 1856, have been successful; the store in Buena Vista has just been closed, and William H HofFhas now retired from active life; his family consists of four — John, Lewis J ., William H., Jr., and Charles M. John, the oldest, and Charles represent the house now in Eleroy, which is the leading store of that busy and flourishing village. The Hoff Brothers carry a stock of $5,500, all new and of latest patterns, and, although just starting, are doing a paying business, with increasing sales every day, and their trade spreading out through a section of the finest agricultural country in the county. John Hoff is married and has one child

HENRY HOLLIS, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Eleroy; born in England June 6. 1811, now 67 years old; when he was 32 years of age he came to the United States, having labored up to that time with his father; he is one of a family of twelve children, and the only one now alive. Mr. Hollis bought the farm which he now owns, in 1846, and consists of 120 acres, on Sees. 34 and 35; being a man without a family, he got a partner named Richard Clark, who stayed with him some seven or eight years, but went West in 1872 and married, and in 1879 he died; his widow now lives in Miami, Kan. Mr. Hollis is a Democrat.

REV. M. J. HORGAN; P. O. Lena; now presiding over the Dublin Circuit; he was born in Ireland, in 1850, and came to America in 1851; while a boy, attended school in Rockford, Ill.; commenced studying for the ministry in 1864; attended college in Indiana, and after three years in Chicago, went to the Suspation Seminary of Baltimore, and then was ordained in 1876; he was assigned to his present mission in 1879; this church building was erected in 1849; it is a stone structure 60x30 feet on the ground, and 20 feet high; it is nicely finished, and furnished with an organ, and has a seating capacity of 300; the membership now numbers sixty families. This organization of the Dublin Church is the oldest in the county. In 1841, a log church was erected by some twenty persons, and the first priest was Father Devlin; the congregation growing, a second building under Father John Cavanaugh was erected in 1846, but, not proving sufficient for their growing settlement, the present building was commenced under Father McLaughlin, and was finished under Father McO'Gara, costing in the neighborhood of $4,000. Mr. Doyle gave 2 acres on which the church buildings stand.

D. H. IDE, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Eleroy; born in Ripley Co., Ind., Aug. 23, 1844; he went to Onondaga Co. and worked for Mr. Anthony, and went to school winters; worked for one man from 14 to 22 years of age; left Onandaga Co. in 1866 with Mr. Anthony, and came West to Stephenson Co.; worked till 1867 with him; in 1868, Mr. Anthony died. Mr. Ide then worked the place for two years, and then went into the mercantile business, which he carried on for three months, and then moved on to his present farm in November, 1871; he owns a fine residence and 26 acres of land; raises stock and grain, which he markets in Eleroy. He is a Republican and has been Township Clerk, and held school offices. In November, 1871, he married Mrs. Anthony; their family is Ruhama, Ferry and four children — Jennie, Abbie, Willie and Emma; of his fathers family two sisters live in Michigan, two brothers and one sister live- in the East.

H. S. JONES and Elizabeth G. Jones settled in Eleroy, Stephenson Co., in June, 1846; he was the first Postmaster, appointed in 1847, and gave the place its name; bought a stock of goods in 1846, and continued the hotel and mercantile business eighteen years; he built a large stone hotel in 1848. Hiram S. Jones was born in Vermont Dec. 24, 1804; Elizabeth G. Jones was born in Tompkins Co., N. Y., March 31, 1826; they were both raised in New York, and came from there to Illinois. H. S. Jones' father's name was John Jones; Elizabeth G. Jones' father's name was Isaac Evans. Mr. and Mrs. Jones had six children, all born at Eleroy; the eldest, Edwin Eugene, is now living at Lena, Ill.; the next that is living is Florin, L., a merchant at Freeport; the third, a daughter, Mrs. Carrie B. Hoff, whose husband is a merchant at Eleroy; the other three are dead. H. S. Jones moved to Lena in 1864, and practiced law there until his death, in April, 1865.

HERMANN KLAAS, farmer and carpenter, Sec. 15; P. O. Eleroy; born in Germany on Sept. 27, 1836; came to America in 1859; his brother, who is now in Kansas, came over in 1857, and when Hermann arrived here he at once went to his brother's farm, with whom he stayed ten years; he has a brother (William) on the same section; Hermann bought, in 1862, about 22 acres to begin with, and now has 102 acres, valued at $50jan acre, on Sees. 10 and 15. He belongs to the Evangelical Synod, and married, in 1862, Miss Rech, of Germany; they have six children — Henry, Hermann, Lewis, Mina, Clara and Paul.

CARD LEVICA, farmer and stone-mason, Sec. 15; P. O. Eleroy; born in Lippe-Detmold, Germany, Jan. 14, 1830; came to Stephenson Co. in November, 1854; came to Freeport and worked for a man named Hincklemeyer; was taken sick, and intended going home in the spring, but is here yet; in 1855, he went to work on Gilman's House, and when he had $300 bought his first 20 acres; he now owns, in Sees. 10 and 15, about 200 acres, valued at $50 an acre, which he now farms, having given up his trade. In 1856, he married Miss Frederica Tegles, of Germany, and they have a family of five children — Mina (born April 6, 1861), Louisa (born 9th of July, 1862), Card H. (born Nov. 3, 1864), William (born March 20, 1868), and Henry (born March 26, 1871).

JOHN MANLOVE, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Eleroy; born in Montgomery Co., England, fifteen miles from Saulsbury, May 24, 1820; left his native land in 1841 and went to Canada, where he was engaged in cutting wood for limekilns for two or three years, near Moulton; in 1845, he came down to Chicago, which was a small place then, and then to Stephenson Co.; at this time the country here was infested with horse-thieves, and the farm that he now owns he bought of Thomas Hotchkiss, who, at that time, was connected with the gang, and Mr. Manlove was obliged to keep a shotgun ready to protect his rights; his first house was of logs, and built entirely of oak; the one he now lives in was put up in 1848; he owns 3S0 acres, valued at $40 an acre, on Sec. 34. He is a Democrat, and in May, 1841, married Miss Mary Pritchard; they have four children — John W. (now in Lincoln, Neb.), Edward (at home, Pathmaster), Thomas (deceased) and Mary A. (at home). Mr. Manlove has a brother (Thomas) now living in merry England.

LUDWIG NEMIER, farmer, Sec 10; P. O. Lena; born in Germany in 1823; served as a soldier in the old country for one and one-half years, and was engaged as a farmer before coming here; left Germany in 1855, when 32 years of age, and came to Stephenson Co. and bought this farm of 120 acres on Sec. 10, valued at $50 an acre. In 1858, married Miss Wilhemina Hoffmeister, of Rock Grove; they have five children — Frederick (deceased), Henry, Anna, Pauline, Charles (deceased), Mina and John.

DR. E. H. PLASCH, Eleroy; born in Germany 23d of June, 1832; he lived in his native country until 1854, when revolutionary struggles drove him to America; while at home he was engaged in the study of medicine, living in Goethinggen, Hanover, and attending the university of that place; on coming to this country he went almost immediately to Wisconsin, where he practiced medicine for ten years, and, having cultivated a fine ear for music, gave instruction in that art. In 1867, moved to Jo Daviess Co., where he taught and practiced until comiDg to this county, and located in Eleroy; he is now engaged solely with bis practice, and is increasing in favor. In 1858, April 21, married Miss Georgeanna Wurm, of Germany; they have eight children — Anna, Jennie, Oscar, Ida, Herman, Emil, Lillie, Delia; Anna is married to Mr. Joseph Lersch.

WILLIAM RADERS, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Yellow Creek; born in Prussia, Germany, March 10, 1854; came to America when 14 years of age with his father, August Raders. who was born in 1818, and had a family of eleven children — Mary, Charlie, August, Louise, Tracy, Joseph, Lizzie,William (the subject of this sketch ), Pauline (deceased), Mina, Tillie. William farms 182 acres, valued at $35 per acre. He married, in 1878, Miss Sophia Rees, of Illinois, and has one child; he is a Democrat and belongs to the Catholic Church. August was a soldier and served in France when that nation and Prussia adjusted their difficulties.

ABEL J. REES, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Lena; his father was born in Pennsylvania in 1802, and died on the farm here in Erin in 1855; he visited La Salle Co. as early as 1835; in 1836, he came to Stephenson Co. and brought his family out in 1837; they were Daniel J., now in Kansas; Abel J., here on the farm; Lucinda, now Mrs. Kaufman; George W., in St. Paul; John, now in Kent, and Martha Jane, deceased; the family settled at Rock Run, and Abel's father worked at the cooper's trade; sold his quarter-section there and came here in 1847; he bought of J. D. Hinckley; in 1855, Abel took the farm and now owns 160 acres on Sec. 10. Mr. Rees was born in Pennsylvania, Sept. 12, 1834; received an education at district schools; has held township and school offices; is a Republican. In 1864, he married Miss Phcebe Denurr, of Canada, and has four children — U. Grant, George E., Flora M., Abel M. and one deceased; he had three brothers in the service — Daniel J. belonged to the 15th I. V.; George E., to the 92d I. V. I., Co. G; John, to the 146th I. V. I.

JOHN M. REES, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Eleroy; born in Pennsylvania, Nov. 13, 1834; came to Stephenson Co. in 1850, with his father, Simeon Rees, and family of seven children — Catherine A., deceased; John M., here; James M.,a minister of Freeport; Enos S., also a preacher out in Kansas; W. H. Ludwick, deceased; Abbot G., farming on Sec. 36; Joshua F., deceased, and Eleanor L, now Mrs. Lemon, of Monticello, Iowa. The family lived in Loran, and then moved on an 80-acre piece which was the first part of what is now called the Rees estate, consisting of 227 acre3; his father had this all purchased by 1857, and in 1863, he died; Abbot G. now holds part
of the old estate together with W. H. Ludwick's widow, he having died in 1870. John M. moved to his present home in 1861; he owns 160 acres on Sec. 24; has held township and school offices; is now serving as Road Commissioner; is a Democrat. In 1858, he married Miss Elizabeth Fye, of Pennsylvania; they have seven children — Eleanor; Charles W., deceased; Daniel F., James M., Herbert V., William H. and Sydney J. Mr. Rees belongs to the Lutheran Church, called Babb's, in charge of Rev. Peter Gheen; their Sunday school numbers 60 members, of which Mr. Rees is the Superintendent; the church building is 45x60, and 65 feet high to top of steeple; it was erected in 1861.

HENRY ROSENSTEIL, fanner, Sec. 12; P. O. Lena; born in Germany Aug. 22, 1827; his father's family was Louisa, now Mrs. Gossman; Charles Christian, Henry and Frederick; Charles was in Stephenson Co., in 1840, and the rest of the family came in 1842 and settled on Sec. 12, northwest half, and entered nine forties; of this, Henry owns 160 acres, valued at $50 per acre. In fall of 1848, he married Miss Jane Picard, of New York, and has seven children — Lorenzo, now living on part of the old farm; Loran, deceased; Lewis, now in Kansas; Harlow, at home; Herman, Josephine and Charles O., now at home. Mr. H. Rosensteil is a Republican; belongs to the M. E. Church of Lena. His brother Fred lives on east half of Sec. 12; John has been here since 1840, and is in the sugar-factory south of the city of Freeport.

J. V. SNOW, P. O. Freeport; grain and stock dealer at Eleroy; was born in Loran, Mass., June, 1837; the family moved to Stephenson Co. in November, 1837, when he was but 5 months old; his father kept Silver Creek House, just east of Freeport, in 1840, and farmed; had 640 acres on Sec. 1; in 1859, being tired of farming, he rented the farm and moved into Freeport, where he died, in 1866; his wife, J. V. Snow's mother, died previously, in the year 1856, on the farm; his father lived on his income till death; the old family consisted of nine children — Malvina, married to Mr. Taylor, now living in Freeport; Oscar, died on the farm, in 1859; Marion, now in Freeport; Nicholas Mortimer, died 7 years of age in Freeport; two died without names; then Charles, who now lives in Freeport, engaged as a traveling man, and Ellen, who was married to Mr. Babcock, and died in 1854. Mr. Snow, in early life, commenced by learning his a b c's of his brother-in-law, Mr. Taylor, who also taught his brother Charles and sister Ellen; he attended school when 8 years old, and lived at home with his father and farmed until he was 22 years of age, when the farm was rented to Green and Edmund*, and the family came to Freeport. J. V. Snow at this period of his life engaged in the lightning-rod business, and, in June, 1879, went into his present occupation, buying grain and stock at Eleroy,which has developed by his energy into as busy a grain point as any in the county. Mr. Snow is a Republican, and, in April, 1865, married Miss Julia E. Hitchcock, of Glen's Falls, N. Y.

JOHN STOUT, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Eleroy; born near Reading, Berks Co., Penn., Sept. 23, 1805; he worked on the farm and went to school; in 1818, moved to Union Co.; at 18 years of age learned tanning, but afterward went to distilling; his health then failing, he returned to school and then clerked until 1832, when he married Miss Sarah Kryder, of Pennsylvania; in June, the 15th, he engaged in tanning until 1848, having run a tannery of his own fourteen years; he came West and bought land of James Murphy; he still holds his farm of 200 acres, valued at $50 an acre; has held the office of Justice, Clerk, Assessor and Commissioner; is a Democrat and has belonged to church since 16 years of age; now attends the Lutheran. His family consists of three sons — R. G. is now on the old homestead farming, and is Supervisor of Erin; H. E. is now in Iowa, and Robert C. is a pharmacist and now teaching school. Of his father's family, there were Susan, Jacob, David, Samuel, Catherine and John, being the elder.

FRANK R. TOWER, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Lena; born Aug. 4, 1845, on the homestead; Frank's father, Reuben Tower, was born in Massachusetts in 1796; came to Stephenson Co., in 1844 with his family, and took up a claim of 160 acres on Sec. 2; his children were Marcus, now in Warren; Amasa, in Richland,' Wis.; Cornelia, deceased; Angeline, deceased; Catherine, now Mrs. Brewster; Mary, deceased; Frank R., Sarah N. and Dorothea D. Frank R., on Dec. 12, 1859, married Miss Mary L. Bacon, of Wisconsin, and has one child — Rose E., born Sept. 29, 1870; he has held township and school offices. Is a Republican; owns 40 acres of the homestead; his father, Capt. Reuben Tower, died April 3, 1880, at home; during his eventful life he had lived in Vermont in 1815, in Norwalk, Ohio, 1818, in La Porte, Ind., 1824, in McHenry Co., Ill., in 1843, and, among other things, ground twenty bushels of buckwheat in a coffee-mill; in 1867, he joined the Baptist Church of Lena, and was a stanch Republican.

MRS. CATHERINE WEISEN; P. O. Eleroy; born in Ireland; in 1836; came to Stephenson Co. in 1856; she here met and married Mr. Kennedy, in August, and then moved out to his farm on Sec. 22; he was a good scholar, having taught in Cork College, in Ireland, and being Notary Public, also, School District Treasurer; her maiden name was Catherine Monogue, of Calvin, County Kilkenny; she now owns 160 acres, valued at $50 an acre. The Kennedy family consisted of four children — James, at home; John, near Savannah; Catherine, now Mrs. F. Maha, and Mary Ann. In 1867 she married again, Mr. J. Weisen; they were married on the farm; by the second marriage she had one child, named Joseph E.; Mr. Weisen was born in Germany, and worked in this country on his father's place till his father's death, when he fell heir to some 20 acres; by trade he was a blacksmith.

JOHN WINTERS, blacksmith, Eleroy; born in Lebanon Co., Penn., Dec. 29, 1834; came to Stephenson Co. in 1847, with his father's family, and stayed in Oneco for two years, then moved on to Sec. 35, Erin, where his father, Christopher Winters, died Feb. 28, 1878; his mother is now 78 years of age. The old family consisted of some fourteen or fifteen children; his brother Cyrus now lives on the old homestead, which he now owns; and John, who was 13 years of age on coming to the county, farmed until 1855, then learned the trade of blacksmith, and had his shop ou Sec. 35, from 1859 to 1863; then came here in Eleroy, and has by his skill and strict attention to business established himself. On Sept. 24, 1857, he married Miss Cornelia Johnson, of Ohio, and has seven children — John A., Flora P., Ida B., Christopher, Archie, Gertrude and Maude. Mr. Winters was a soldier in the war of the rebellion; he belonged to the 42d I. V. I., Co. G; five of his brothers were serving during the entire war.

E. H. WOODBRIDGE, Eleroy; born in St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., Nov. 11, 1821; he stayed with the family till 1835; and, having learned the carpenter's trade at 14 years of age, went to Ohio, and worked at his trade in Franklin, Portage Co.; from there he moved to Wisconsin in 1843, and engaged in making brick, teaming and other things; he then moved to Eleroy, in Erin Township, in the month of June, 1847; here he lives on his own property, and when not engaged in farming is serving the public in different offices; he is now Assessor of Erin; has been Township Clerk, Collector and Constable. He is a Democrat; and on Sept. 1, 1844, married Miss Eliza Denure, of New York; they have three children — the eldest is dead — the next is Cora A., and the last child Fannie May.

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Remarkable Stories, Volume 1
by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a Licensed Massage Therapist and Life Coach. An amateur historian, parts of these stories and many more appear on his website, www.robertbike.com.

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ONECO TOWNSHIP

JOHN W. BAUMGARDNER, with Deal & Swartz, Orangeville; born in Stephenson Co., Ill., Nov. 27; he went to Western College, at Western, Lynn Co., Iowa, took a classical course, and graduated in 1878; then he went into business there, but closed out and came to Orangeville, and went in with Deal & Cq., general merchandise, and has been here since. In 1876, Aug. 17, he married Miss Frances Owen, of Pennsylvania, who was born in April, 1854; their child is named Katie C. Mr. Baumgardner is now studying for the United Brethren ministry; his father died in 1855; his mother, Catharine, while a widow living at Buckeye Center, married Martin Bender, who died in 1876, in the fall; she is now living with her sister on the old estate.

D. L. BEAR, farmer, Sec. 33; P. O. Orangeville; born in Lehigh Co., Penn., May 21, 1834; came to Stephenson Co. in 1842, with father, mother, his sister Mary (now Mrs. Shipton), and brothers John G., Willoughby and Peter J. D. L. Bear settled on Sec. 33 in 1863; owns 235 acres. May 6, 1858, he married Miss Susanna Wohlford, of Pennsylvania, who was born in Center Co. March 15, 1836; their family consists of six children — Lucy A., Aaron Willard, Peter D. L., Christ Benjamin, John H. and David E. (twins). Mr. Bear has held township and school offices, belongs to the United Brethren Church, and is a Republican in politics.

WILLOUGHBY BEAR, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Orangeville; born in Union Co., Penn., March 20, 1838; learned the trade of mason and bricklaying; came West to Stephenson Co. in 1841; now lives on the old homestead, where his father died in 1850, and his mother in 1864; he now owns 95 acres of land, valued at $50 an acre. In 1861, he was married to Miss Rebecca Hartman, of Pennsylvania; they have six children — Sarah Jane (now Mrs. A. Fahr), Mary A., Ida L., Howard C, Bertha R. and Wilson G. Mr. Bear has been Road Commissioner, School Trustee, and is a member of the United Brethren Church and Sabbath-School Superintendent. In politics, he is a Republican.

B. P. BELKNAP, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Orangeville; born in Vermont, Dec. 24, 1811. In 1836, he was married to Miss Deborah Beebe, of Vermont; moved to Albany, N. Y., and went into the coal business; in 1839, he started West, and walked from Milwaukee to Monroe, Wis., and then to Gratiot; his wife came in 1841; they stopped with the Brewster family on Sec. 25, then moved on the farm where they now reside, consisting of 140 acres, and, with the exception of six years in Monroe, Wis., have been here since. Mr. Belknap taught the first school in Oneco Township, at Aaron Denio's house, in 1840. The children are Mary (now Mrs. Everett ), Lattig (deceased), Hannah (now Mrs. Mulks), Corwin (who has served in the 46th I. V. I. Co. A), F. C, Edwin C., Lillie M., Edwin (deceased) and Laura (deceased). Mr. Belknap has been Constable, Coroner and Commissioner of Highways.

FRANKLIN BOLENDER, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Orangeville; born in Union (now Snyder) Co., Penn., Jan. 30, 1834; came to Stephenson Co. in 1840 with his father, Michael, who was accompanied by the well-known old settlers Brother John Bolender, Johu Kleckner, Michael Gift and George Mowry. Michael's family were Caroline, Lewis, Frank, Henry, Harrison and Benjamin, living in Pennsylvania. Michael Bolender settled on the farm where he is now living, aged 78, being now entirely blind since 1878; the rest of his family was born in Oneco Township — Michael, Mary, Anna and Amelia. Franklin is now farming part ol the old estate, and owns 80 acres on Sec. 30, since 1875. On Jan. 30, 1868, he was married to Miss Susan Rockey, of Pennsylvania; their children are Charles, Oscar, Edwin, Emma and William (deceased. Mr. Bolender has been Assessor and has held school offices. Religion, Reformed Church; in politics, a Republican.

HARRISON W. BOLENDER, of the firm of Schoch & Bolender, proprietors of Orangeville Creamery; came to the county with his father and family in 1840; the family consisted of Caroline, now Mrs. Reubendoll; Lewis, on Sec. 29, Oneco; Frank, same Section; Henry, on Sec. 30; Harrison W., the subject of this sketch; Mary, now Mrs, Marion; Anna L., now Mrs. Fahr; Amelia, now Mrs. Belknap, on Sec. 30; an infant and Peter, deceased; mother died in June, 1878; Harrison W., was born in Union Co., Penn., Nov. 18, 1839; at the age of 18, he worked with his brother Lewis, as architect and builder; in 1875, went into the wind-mill business, under the name of Swartz & Bolender; gave up, and is now partner of the firm of Schoch & Bolender, Orangeville Creamery. In 1870, he, married Miss Mary Wagner, of Illinois; their children are Anna, Michael (dead), Helen and Stephen. Mr. Bolender was in the 46th I. V. I., Co. A, and was wounded in the arm, shoulder and thigh; he was one of the Trustees and member of the Board of Education; he is a Republican in politics.

AARON BOWER, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Orangeville; born in Union Co., Penn., Feb. 11, 1840; the party that came West consisted of father, Abraham Bower, himself and sister Mary, now Mrs. Naramore. living at Lena; in the spring of 1851, they settled here, on Sec. 35; here he now lives, owns 210 acres of land. In 1863, he married Miss Amelia Hackenberg, of Pennsylvania, has a family of five children — Cora, Eluoa, Cornelia, Isabelle, Otto A. and Melvin Mr. Bower's wife belongs to the M. E. Church.

JOHN BOWER, retired farmer, Orangeville; born in Union Co., Penn., June 30, 1805; visited Stephenson Co. in 1843, and returned for his family; on coming West then, he settled in Oneco, in April, 1816; while in Pennsylvania, he learned the carpenter trade, which he followed until coming West; in the spring of 1816, he located on Sec. 36, and built not four rods from where the Orangeville tavern now stands; he had also bought the water-power, and in 1848, started Bower's grist mill, now called White Hall Mills; he laid out the village of Orangeville, then called Bowerville, and now owns considerable town property, together with the hotel, which his son William runs. In 1826, he married Miss Susanna Riehe, of Pennsylvania, who was born in 1807, and is now living with him; their family are Martin, Mary, now dead; Moses, John, Benjamin. Martet, deceased; William, landlord of Orangeville hotel; Catharine, now Mrs. Hayman. Mr. Bower belongs to the Reform Church.

DR. B. H. BRADSHAW, physician and surgeon, Orangeville; born in Guernsey, Belmont Co., Ohio, Sept. 29, 1834, and came to Freeport in 1855, and in Feb. 20, 1861, graduated in the Rush Medical College, of Chicago. On the breakiDg-out of the war, he enlisted in the 46th I. V. I., Co. G; was detailed as Assistant Surgeon, and then, finally, on the 12th of Sept., 1862, commissioned Surgeon; was mustered out with regiment in 1866; Jan. 31, came to Orangeville and commenced practice in the field formerly held by Dr. W. P. Naramore, and now has a very nice busiuess. In 1868, Jan. 1, he married Miss Mary E. Cadweil, of Illinois; their children are Caroline P. and George T. Dr. B. belongs to the M. E. Church; he is a Republican in politics.

CHARLES A. CADWELL, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Orangeville; was born in Oneco Township, Stephenson Co., Ill., June 24, 1848, on the homestead which his father had claimed in 1839, aud in 1841 took possession; his father died in 1873; his mother, in 1877, leaving seven children — Mary C., Horace, Charles A. (the subject of this sketch), Abbie, Emily, Isaac and Helen; Charles has conducted the estate since 1872. In 1871, was married to Miss Amanda Fahr of Orangeville, Stephenson Co., Ill; their children are Mary E. and a pair of twins, Benjamin and Bertha. Mr. Cadweil has been a teacher; has held school offices; in politics, he is a Republican.

W. H. CLARNO, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Orangeville; born in Tazewell Co., Ill., April 3, 1835. Grandfather, John H. Clarno, came from France to Virginia, where John Hunter Clarno was born, who then moved to Ohio, and married Miss Jane Plimel, of that State, and in 1832 moved to Illinois, and was elected Captain in a company during the Black Hawk war; moving to Stephenson Co., Aug. 16, 1838, he located on Sec. 34, where he entered 280 acres; the family then were father, who died Jan. 12, 1858; mother, who died April 21, 1877, and ten children; Jane, now Mrs. Bailey; Andrew, Francis (deceased), one daughter (deceased); W. H., the subject of this sketch; John M., Hariette, now Mrs. Foans; Joseph, James, M. and Francis are dead. W. H. Clarno now is sole owner of the old estate, having 200 acres. On Nov. 22, 1860, he married Miss Mary C. Kyler, of Pennsylvania; their children are Mary Jane, Sarah E., John H., Oliver P., Anthony J., Aaron A., M. Lewella, Stella V., J. Albert. Mr. Clarno has held township and school offices. Republican in politics.

H. R. DEAL, Orangeville; born in 1851, in Oneco, Stephenson Co., Ill.; after he common experience of youth in the country, he entered the store of his father father as clerk in 1876, and afterward went to Monroe and followed the same occupation; returning in 1877, he went to work for J. Musser in September of that year- where he now clerks. In 1872, he married Miss M. Alifie Ritzman, of Pennsylvania, W. E. and Villian I. are his children. Mr. Deal belongs to the Board of Trustees.

S. E. DEAL, merchant, Orangeville; born Oct. 19, 1825, in Northampton Co., Penn; he lived with his parents in Philadelphia, in 1831; in Lycoming Co., in 1839, and learned the carpenter's trade, and came to Stephenson Co. in the spring of 1848; worked at his trade till his eyesight failed in 1857, when he went to farming; but in 1863 moved to Oneco, and then to Orangeville in 1870; opened a grocery and confectionery in 1874, and since has continued in business until now. He carries a stock of general merchandise worth $6,000. and does a trade of over $20,000 per annum; the firm is known as Deal & Swartz. In 1847, he married Miss Catherine Ray horn, of Pennsylvania, who died Aug. 19, 1874. Was married again to Miss Mary Bumgartner, then Mrs. Bechtol; their children are Henry R., Mary C. (now Fahr). Mr. Deal has belonged to the U. B. for forty years, and has held office most of the time.

J. C. DORN, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Orangeville; born in Cortland Co., N. Y., Feb. 21, 1817; mother died in 1826, father in 1827, leaving him an orphan at the age of 10; lived with his uncle till 1838, and taught school in New York, Mississippi, Illinois and Ohio. He visited Illinois in 1843, and bought a farm on Sec. 35, of 160 acres; went back to Ohio, and Dec. 31, 1844, married Miss Betsy Hayward, of Ohio. He has taught school here in the West, and also music, to the early settlers. Mr. Dorn has been Justice of rhe Peace since 1866; has been School Treasurer and Clerk of Board; the children are Lavina, died when 4 weeks old; Mary, died when 3-1/2 years old; John Quincy, died when 5-1/2 years old; Nancy, John, Charles P. (dentist in Naperville; ) Helen, now Mrs. Wagner, George D. and Amelia A. Presbyterian in religion.

GEORGE ERB, retired farmer, Orangeville; born in Union Co., Penn., Aug. 12, 1808; came to Stephenson Co. in 1854, and went on to a farm on Sec 33, but finally moved into the town of Orangeville. On Feb. 16, 1830, he married Miss Mary Ann Gross, of Pennsylvania; his first family consists of twelve children; this wife died in 1858. Married again, in the fall of 1860, to Miss Julia Ann Woodring; all his first family are dead but two; those living are Sophaiel, Catharine (now Mrs. Smith), Ida May, Amanda E. Henry and Isaac enlisted in Co. G, 93d I. V. I.; Henry was wounded and taken prisoner at Altoona, and died; Isaac was killed at Champion Hill. Mr. Erb is Trustee of the village, and an Elder in the Lutheran Church.

JOHN F. FINK, clerk, with J. Musser, Orangeville; came to Stephenson Co. in 1850, with his father, Joshua, whose family consisted of mother (maiden name Elizabeth Kaufman), children — George (deceased), Charles, Matilda (deceased), Jonas D. VV. (a preacher, in Lisbon. Iowa), Sarah (now Mrs. Moore), John F., Maria (deceased), Thomas J. (a preacher), and Mary E. (now Mrs. C. W. Anthony). John F. was born in Allentown, Lehigh Co., Penn., Dec. 23, 1844, and engaged in the woolen business in 1868. and afterward carried on the insurance business till 1877, and then came to Orangeville as a clerk in J. Musser's establishment. In 1866, he married Miss Mary A. Nagle, of Pennsylvania; they have two childreu — J. W. Ellis (deceased), and Vida Delight, now 7 years old. Mr. Fink has held the offices of Trustee, Clerk and Collector, and is now Clerk of the Board of Education. He is a Republican in politics, and a member of the M. E. Church.

JACOB FISHER, farmer, Sec. 33; P. O. Orangeville; born in Union Co., Penn., Feb. 21, 1806, and stayed in Clinton Co. for eighteen years; then started VY est, stopping in Rock Grove, June 6, 1847; then he moved on to Sec. 28, Oneco Township, in 1848, where he built the house which is now occupied by his son John; he having since moved to Sec. 33, where he now lives; owns 200 acres of farm land. On Feb. 22, 1829, he married Miss Maria Kayhorn, of Pennsylvania; they have one son — John Fisher, born Oct. 29, 1829; has held township offices; belongs to Lutheran Church; politics. Democrat. His father's family consisted of thirteen children; his mother's maiden name was Christina Walmar.

JACOB FYE, farmer, Sec 34; P. O. Orangeville; born in Centre Co., Penn., Feb. 10, 1839; came to Stephenson Co. in the fall of 1839, with his father, David Fye, and family, consisting of eight children — John (living in Nebraska), Sarah (now Mrs. Zettle"), Jacob (the subject of this sketch), Mary (now Mrs. Kohr); beside these, David and Rebecca live in Pennsylvania yet; and one died in 1853, named Katie. On coming West, settled first in Dakota Township; lived there until 1868, when he sold out and moved to this farm of 80 acres, valued at $50 an acre; his father died in 1872; his mother is still living, and will be 83 years old July 9, 1880. On Dec. 22. 1864, he married Miss Sarah Lanker, of Dauphin Co., Penn., and has nine children — Katie H., Edwin P., Samuel W., Minnie L., Levi F., Arthur H.. Alice L., Boydd M. and Bessie E. Mr. Fye belongs to the M. E. Church.

LEWIS GIBLER, Oneco; born in Shenandoah Co., Va., Nov. 1, 1799, moved to Ohio, Ross Co., in 1802, and put up the first mill built in that county; Jacob Philip and John, his brothers, served in the war of 181 '3; father died in 1818, Jan. 10; mother died in 1836. Mr. Gibler, in 1819, married Miss Margaret Van Metre, of Ohio, and, in 1828, came West and worked in the mines, with wife's brother, John J., James and Abraham; he sold out his share and returned to Ohio; went to farming; in 1839, came to Stephenson Co. and settled on Sec. 1. having a farm of 300 acres; moved to Wisconsin and came to the village of Oneco, in 1855; lived in Freeport and settled here again, where his wife died Oct. L'4, 1878; she was the mother of thirteen children, grand mother of sixty, and great-grandmother of forty-four; she was buried in Mt. Pleasant Cemekry; children are Morgan, John, Sarah, Jesse, Mary, Jefferson, dead; Prucilla, Lewis B., Joseph H., William, Margaret and Catherine. Held township and school offices; belongs to Christian Church, and Democrat in politics.

MICHAEL GIFT, retired farmer, Orangeville; born in Union Co., Penn., Jan. 3, 1816; there he learned the trade of blacksmith and worked at the trade three years, and, in 1840, came here to Stephenson Co., in company with his wife's family, her father, John Kleokner, and her mother, with four children; Charles Kleckner, wife and family, and the subject of this sketch, located first in Rock Grove. In 1843, he married Miss Ann E. Kleckner, and moved on to his farm on Sec. 19, Oneco Township; he now owns 300 acres, and, in 1877, in the fall, he moved to Orangeville. His son, William H., lives on Sec. 21; Mary E., now Mrs. Potts, and George T., on Sec. 19, are the children. Mr. Gift has held township and school offices; Republican, Lutheran.

REV. R. A. HARWOOD, Pastor of M. E. Church, Orangeville; born in Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1852, May 16; he attended school at Mt. Morris, in 1875 and 1876, and afterward went to Rock River Seminary, under Principal M. C. Dougherty; he then taught school and farmed till September, 1877, when he concluded to enter the ministry; in September, he was licensed to preach; in 1878, admitted to Conference, and October of same year, took the Orangeville Circuit of McConnell's Grove, Winslow, Oneco, Pleasant Hill and Franklin. In 1876, Dec. 24, he married Miss Emma I. Gilman, of Illinois; they have one child, named Miner, 16 months old; his mother came to the county in 1848, and is now living at Eleroy; his father died in 1834.

LYMAN HULBURT, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born in Easton, Madison Co., N. Y., Feb. 11, 1809; went to Chautauqua Co. in 1819, and came West in 1837, his father having died in 1825; the party consisted of mother, himself and wife, with two children; settled first in Winslow Township, in spring of 1838; located on Sec. 33, Oneco Township, where he owns 120 acres of land. He was married, 1833, in Chautauqua Co., N. Y., to Miss Jane Cross, who was born iu 1816; their children are Delos, Ira, Mary, now Mrs. Diveley: Lyman, who was killed at Chattanooga, a member of the 93d I. V. I., Co. C, and John. Mr. Hulburt belongs to the Christian Church at Mt. Pleasant.

GEORGE KLINE, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Orangeville; born in Union Co.' Penn., Nov. 26, 1831; in his younger days, worked with his father at blacksmithing; in 1856, came West on a visit, and went back to get his wife and two children, and in May 27, 1867, settled on Sec. 28; bought a farm of D. S. Young, containing 82 acres, but afterward became possessor of more land, and now owns 152 acres, valued at $50 an acre. In 1854, was married to Miss Caroline Benfer, of Pennsylvania; have a family of four children — S. Ellen, M. Emma, Laura A., an infant, now deceased, and Jesse M. Mr. Kline is now Road Commissioner, being elected in the spring of 1880; in polities, a Republican. Two of his brothers were soldiers in the war of the rebellion — Eli Kline and L. S. Kline.

CHARLES LESTIKOW, farmer, Sec. 33; P. O. Orangeville; born in Prussia, Germany, June 4, 1835; landed in New York Oct. 3, 1864; came West and settled on this farm on Sec. 33, Oneco Township, in the spring of 1865; owns 95 acres, valued at $45 an acre. In 1864, on Christmas, he married Miss Minnie Hubner, also a native of Germany; they have five children — Rudolph, Emma, Jennie, Charles and Anna. Mr. Lestikow is a member of the M. E. Church, and Republican in politics.

JOHN McDANIEL, merchant, Oneco; born in Ohio, Dec. 10, 1815; came to Stephenson Co. June 12, 1849; settled on Sec. 20, Oneco Township, and farmed till 1880, when he moved to the village of Oneco and opened a grocery store on February 19; he now owns 25 acres in the village and the store and residence. On Nov. 28, 1837, he married Miss Nancy Walton, of Ohio; two children — Melinda J. and Mary E. Belongs to Christian Church.

J. H. MILLER, book keeper with J. Musser, Orangeville; came to Stephenson Co. with his father, Charles S. Miller, and mother, Elizabeth, nee Dersham. J. H. Miller was born in Union Co., Penn., Oct. 23, 1852; came to this county, and, in 1871, took a commercial course at the college at Naperville; then taught school; however, he returned and took a course in penmanship, and taught that art until entering the employ of B. & J. Musser as book-keeper, where he has been to this time. On Nov. 4, 1877, he married Miss Lila C. Bobb, of Illinois. Evangelical in religion.

DANIEL MOORE, retired farmer, Oneco; born in Union Co., Penn., Aug. 2, 1814; learned the mason's trade, and in Pennsylvania constructed a cellar for Mr. Van Valzee, one of the first settlers and physicians of Stephenson Co. Mr. Moore came to the county in 1868, and finally settled on Sec. 25, and owns a farm of 120 acres there now. In 1836, Oct. 16, he married Miss Rachel Rudy, of Dauphin Co., Penn.; they have nine children — Phoebe A., deceased; William R., Catharine D., now Mrs. Kline; Amelia B., now Mrs. P. Strahan; Sarah E., now Mrs. Fred Winter; Mary Jane, now Mrs. Kline; Thomas James, deceased; John H., deceased, and Rachel E., deceased. Himself and wife attend the M. E. Church. His son William was a soldier belonging to the 46th I. V. I., Co. A, of which he was Second Lieutenant; he was wounded at Jackson, Miss.

E. T. MOORE, miller, Orangeville; came to Stephenson Co. in 1848, with his father and family; they stopped in Cedarville, and run the mill for John H. Adams; removed to Freeport, and at one time run the old Lurch mill, which is now destroyed; in 1866, they moved to Orangeville and bought the flouring-mill of Hetty & Legler, which E. T. Moore now runs; the mill is 40x60 feet on the ground, and three and a half stories high, running three pair of buhrs with the Leffler water-wheel, Turbine, capacity 200 bushels a day. The old family is Ann S., now Mrs. Kaufman; Edward T., Oscar C, deceased; Rebecca, now dead; Aaron, deceased; Agnes A., now Mrs. Wade; William H., now dead; John J., now dead; Ellen R., now Mrs. Tucker; and Mary A., deceased. E. T. Moore was born in Northampton Co., Penn., in 1832; has been a miller all his life. In 1859, he married Miss Sarah Fink, of Pennsylvania; he has a family of six children — Anna, Stephen, Tillie, Mary, Arthur and Stella. He has held township offices. Is Evangelical in religion, and a Democrat in politics.

CHARL.ES MUSSER, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Orangeville; born in Center Co., Penn., Dec. 15, 1844; his father, Jonas, died in 1855; Charles was engaged in farming and clerking before coming West to Stephenson Co. in 1858; he clerked for J. M. Smith, of Buena Vista, then for Kennegy & Delhauer, and afterward for J. & B. Musser, of Orangeville. Jan. 4, 1869, he was married to Miss Mary A. Pollock; in 1870, he bought 160 acres of land, his present farm; raises grain and stock; has two children — Thomas O. and Winnefred M. Mr. M. has held school offices, and served in the war in Co. A, 46th I. V. I.

EMANUEL MUSSER, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Orangeville; born in Center Co., Penn., Jan. 13, 1826. In 1855, he was married to Miss Harriet Confer, of Pennsylvania, and farmed for two years in Center Co.; then came West to Stephenson Co., Ill.; in 1857, he bought a farm of 120 acres on the Kleckner place; built a residence in 1875, and cleared 50 acres: he now has 100 acres under the plow. He has held township and school offices; in religion is Lutheran, and in politics a Republican. He has five children — Mary C, Emma A., William A., C. Bo\d and Meda M.

JAMES MUSSER, merchant, Orangeville; born in Centre Co., Penn., 1843; came to Stephenson Co., in 1857, and attended school at Orangeville, afterward at Beloit, where in 1861, he joined a company, which not being accepted, he jnined the 46th I. V. I., Co. A; having served three years, he re-enlisted in December, 1863, and came home in 1865, having served in the war of the rebellion for four years and six months, lacking ten days; he entered the commercial business with his brother on Sept. 10, 1866; the firm, under the name of B. & J. Musser, in one year, did $85,000 worth of business, and employed seven men in different departments; Mr. J. Musser now carries about $14,000 in stock; the firm of B. & J. dissolved in 1876. In 1870, he married Miss Kate E. Zimmerman, of Pennsylvania; they have three children — Herbert A., Mabel E. and Royston; has held township offices. Republican in politics.

MICHAEL MUSSER, real estate broker, Orangeville; born in Gregg Township, Centre Co., Penn., in 1833; came with his parents and family to Stephenson Co. in 1856; lived on the farm, Sec. 2, Buckeye Township. On Jan. 10, 1870, he married Miss Sarah Wohlford, of Illinois, and has two sons — Johu B., born in 1873, and Logan C, born in 1878. Mr. Musser moved to Orangeville aud entered the firm of B. & J. Musser, general merchandise, in 1870, and in 1877 withdrew, and has been engaged in real estate since; he owns now 378 acres in different parts of the township; at one time his four brothers belonged to the 46th I. V. I., Co. A. — John, Benjamin, Charles and James; while Michael looked after the estate at home, the others were serving their country.

WILLIAM J. MUSSER, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Orangeville; born in Centre Co., Penn, Oct. 27, 1852, and in 1876, came to Stephenson Co.; located on Sec. 19, buying the farm of 120 acres of John Confer. In 1877, he married Miss Jennie Wolf, of Pennsylvania, and they have a little girl name! Elsie. Politics, Republican.

REV. B. F. PUGH, Pastor, Lutheran; Orangeville; born in Somerset Co., Penn., Aug. 4, 1847; in 1864, he enlisted in the 5th Penn. V. I., Co. K; mustered out June 30, 1865, at Vienna, Va.; returned, and after working on the farm, entered the school-room; in this vocation he taught in the States of Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, and at other times was employed as clerk at different stores till 1870; in the fall he started for Ceylon's Grove; here he attended the Missionary Institute, in 1871, taking a classical and theological course; graduating on May 29, 1877; was ordained by the Susquehanna Synod, at Bloomsburg, June 27; commenced preaching in Orangeville July 29, 1877. On Sept. 10, 1878, he was married to Miss A. F. Cadwell, in Elmira, N.Y.; they have one child — Claude Stanley, born Nov. 4, 1879. Republican in politics.

WILLIAM M. RAYMOND, stock and grain farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Oneco; born in Canada May 10, 1834; came into Stephenson Co. in 1843, and worked farm work for David L. Humphrey for ten years, and after Mr. Humphrey's death he purchased the farm in the year 1867; owns 154 acres; is now building a fine residence where he helped to build Mr. H's house in 1843. On July 4, 1861, he married Miss Hannah Jane Van Matre, of Illinois, and has a family of four children — Olive, now Mrs. Fenner, Farmer B., Emma, and Willie V., born June 28, 1873. Mr. Raymond has held township and school offices. Politics, Democrat; religion, Christian. He is one of the three farmers — T. J. and W. J. Van Matre and William M. Raymond, stock farmers, having the finest Norman imported horses in Stephenson Co.

JACOB L. RAYHORN, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. McConnell's Grove; born in Stephenson Co., Ill., Sept. 3, 1849; his parents having come West in that year, and settled in Rock Grove, and after farming at Hickory Grove and down on Cedar Creek, they moved to their present home on Sec. 32 in 1863; Jacob now farms all the estate, his father having retired from active labor. In the spring of 1877, he married Miss Agnes Garret; their child is named Clinton Lumas. Mr. Rayhorn is now a Trustee of the U. B. Church, and School Director.

G. F. RIEM, retired farmer, Orangeville; came West with his father in 1845; located on Sec. 36, Stephenson Co., Oneco Township, where he now lives on his farm of 119 acres. The old family consists of Martin (deceased); Eliza, now Mrs. Potts; Sarah, now Mrs. Trotter; James (deceased); George Franklin at home; mother died in 1879. G. F. Riein was born in Union Co., Penn., Feb. 26, 1843: has been farming with his father since. On Dec. 21, 1870, he married Miss Clara E. Cross, of Illinois; they have three children — Mary, Esther, George D. and Emma Jane. Mr. Riem has held office of Township Clerk for eight years, and is a Democrat. The Orangeville school buildings are on part of his farm, and he sold one acre for $400.

THOMAS H. ROTE, blacksmith, Orangeville; born in Aaronsburg, Center Co., Penn., July 3, 1861; attended commercial school at Iron City College; in 1873, he came West and established himself in Orangeville in 1876; he has held public offices, and is now Clerk of the village. In 1876, he married Miss Laura Emily Cadwell, of Illinois. His father's family were Simon Rote and Susan; parent's children — Archibald, Daniel, John C, Sarah E., now Mrs. Fisher; Mary (deceased), Joanna (deceased), Thomas H. G., Alice P. (deceased). Mr. Rote's parents visited Orangeville in 1877. On his wife's side, the Cadwell family came here to Stephenson Co. in 1839; father, George S. Cadwell, and mother, Caroline (formerly Gillett), settled here in 1841. The family were Mary E., now Mrs. Bradshaw, Forest, Charles A., F. Addie, now Mrs. Pugh., L. Emma, now Mrs. Rote, G. Isaac, Helen.

W. F. SANDERS, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Orangeville; born Union Co., Penn., Dec. 19, 1836; came West to Green Co., Wis., in 1850, after stopping in Lafayette Co.; came to his present location in 1865; the farm of 109 acres he bought of Mr. Worick. His father died in 1874 and mother in 1879. In 1863, he married Miss Margaret Jane Worick, who was born in Centre Co., Penn., in 1846; they now have three children — John W. E., Spurgeon B. and Clayton F. Mr. Sanders has held school and township offices, and belongs to the Evangelical Church. Enlisted in the 15th I. V. I., Co. E; was wounded at the battle of Shiloh in the hip, and now gets a pension.

WILLIAM SANDOE, harness maker and Postmaster, Orangeville; born in Dauphin Co., Penn., Jan. 9, 1844; came to Stephenson Co. in April, 1847, with his father and family; mother died one year afterward, in 1848, and his father, Daniel Sandoe, married again, and, in 1876, died in the village of Orangeville; of the old family, there are two brothers in Iowa, two sisters in Kansas, and two sisters here. William went to Monroe, Wis., in 1860, learned the harness-trade, and when the war broke out, enlisted in the 93d I. V. I., Co. G; returned to Monroe in 1865, and worked for D. F. Corson & Son. In fall of 1867, opened a harness-shop in Orangeville, and married Miss O. V. Knepper, of Maryland, in 1868; they have had three children — Claia D., deceased; Leonora, now 8 years of age; Stella, 5. Mr. Sandoe was appointed Postmaster of Orangeville; is now Police Magistrate; has been Township Clerk, and belongs to the Reformed Church; Republican in politics.

DAVID A. SCHOCH, of the firm of Schoch & Bolender, proprietors of Orangeville Creamery; born in Snyder Co., Penn., Feb. 18, 1834; attended school till 1848, then clerked in Freeburg, Penn.; came to Orangeville in 1855, went to work fur C. M. Sheffer & Co., where he worked till 1857; he then went on to the farm, Sees. 32 and 33, Range 8 east, where he owns 260 acres; and in September, 1878, established the Orangeville Creamery, owned by Schoch & Bolender. In 1857, he married Miss Harriet Wagoner, of Pennsylvania; the children are John, dead; Luella, deceased, and Maude; also an infant dead. Mr. Schoch has held township offices, Treasurer, etc. Attends M. E. Church.

HIRAM SHONS, County Surveyor and farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Orangeville; born in Orange Co., N. Y., Jan. 12, 1816; was engaged in teaching and surveying until the war; and, having moved to Kentucky, raised Co. H of the 2d Battalion of Cavalry in Estill Co., of which he was elected Captain, and when he was mustered out, in 1864. was appointed Government Agent; served till 1865; in 1868, moved on his farm in Stephenson Co., which he owned since 1853; it contains 80 acres, also owns 40 acres in Wisconsin. Tn 1845, was married to Miss Roxana Cadwell, and they have six children — Alice, Alfred C, Hiram, Jr., William H. S., Carrie and Omar. In politics, Republican.

REV. F. W. STUMP, Pastor of Reform Church, Orangeville; born in Stark Co., Ohio, Dec. 11, 1851; usual boyhood's experience until November, 1870; attended college at Heidelburg, Tiffin, Seneca Co., Ohio, in 1876; graduated in the classical course, also in the Theological Seminary of that place; he was licensed to preach by the Ohio Synod of the Reform Church of Orville; came to Orangeville, June 24, 1877; was ordained and installed by the Northern Illinois Classics, in 1877, July 8, in the Orangeville Circuit, embracing the Orangeville, Cedarville, Bellevue and Shueyville charges. Mr. Stump is Dept. (jr. W. C. T. of the Good Templar Lodge of Orangeville.

A. A. SWARTZ, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Orangeville; born in Stephenson Co., Ill., March 23, 1852; has worked at the mason trade; taught school and now farms the old estate; his father came to the county, in 1844, bringing his wife Sarah and a family of five children — Samuel, Jacob, deceased; Anna, deceased; Henry and Andrew, the subject of this sketch; they purchased this farm of Mr. Lomas, consisting of 120 acres farm-land and 80 acres timber. Andrew is not married; his father is a member of the Lutheran Church; his brother Jacob died in 1874, of consumption contracted in the army.

PHILIP SWARTZ, merchant, Orangeville; born in Union Co., Penn., Aug. 13, 1845; in 1866, went to Freeport and entered D. S. Bucher's store as clerk, where he remained six years; then went to Dakota Territory on land tour, where he purchased 160 acres; returned to Freeport and worked with Mr. Walton at Pecatonica; afterward for Albert Plato; in 1879, came to Orangeville and bought one-half interest in S. E. Deal's store; the firm name is now Deal and Swartz. In 1875, he married Miss P. J. Searles, of Ohio. Democrat in politics.

ELIZABETH VAN MATRE, widow, Sec. 28; P. O. ( >rangeville; born in Sangamon Co., Ill., Nov. 7, 1835, and married to Joseph Nogle Van Matre, at Shueyville, Wis., in 1858, July 4, her maiden name being Elizabeth Trotter. He was born in Clinton Co., Penn., April 13, 1837, and came to Stephenson Co. in 1840, and finally settled on the estate which his widow now holds and farms; he died, in 1878, July 28, leaving her the farm on Sec. 28, and a family of two boys — George N., born June, 1862, and Henry C, born Nov. 25, 1863; there is a daughter, Sarah C. and an infant sou deceased. Mr. J. N. Vau Matre has held school offices; belonged to the I. O. O. F. Lodge; she owns 42 acres, well improved; belongs to the Christian Church.

J. W. VAN MATRE, stock and grain farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Oneco; born in Stephenson Co., on the homestead, Oct. 28, 1838, and was a member of L. D. Van Matre's family, consisting of Joseph W., Thomas J., Willard N., Mary E., now Mrs. Sagofer; Melissa, now Mrs. Arledge; Caroline, now Mrs. Rote, and Lucy P., now Mrs. Batten. Mr. J. W. Van Matre owns 202 acres of the estate, and is engaged in raising Norman horses, and with his brother and William Raymond interested in short-horns, with which they are very successful; he has now the finest Norman mares in Stephenson Co. On Oct. 28, 1858, he married Miss Sarah E. Williams, of New York, who died 1859; he was married again in I860, to Miss Samantha Arledge; they have five children — Dora B., L. D., T. J., Emma and Freddie N. Politics, Democrat.

T. J. VAN MATRE, stock and grain farmer, Sec. 2 J; P. O. Oneco; born at Scales Mound, Jo Daviess Co., Ill., Feb. 16, 1834. His father, L. D. Van Matre, and his brother Thomas J., came to Stephenson Co. in 1836, and took up their claims, on which their sons now live. Of the old family, there are L. 1 ., John and Melissa now living; L. D. was born Sept. 20, 1807, and married in Jan. 13, 1831, to Miss Mary Alexander, who died Oct. 3, 1855; he married again, June 22, 1856. T. J., the subject of this sketch, together with his brother W. J., owns about 324 acres, and, in partnership with William Raymond, have imported, and are introducing, full-blood Norman horses, together with short-horn Durham cattle. In April 7, 1855, he married Miss Mary Ann French, of Ohio; they have a son living. Charles W., and one daughter, Nancy F. (deceased). His barn now standing is supposed to be the first built in this county. Politics, Democrat.

REV. O. M. VAN SWEARINGEN, Pastor of (J. B. Church, Orangeville; born in Fayette Co., Penn., Nov. 12, 1843; in early life lived on the farm with father; the old family were Minerva. I Martin Buren, Barbara, now Mrs. Stanley, Thomas I., Otho Miner, Martha, now Mrs. Peugh; his father and mother now live in Whiteside Co., Ill. When 19 years of age, he moved to Ohio, and attended Berlin Normal Institute, and in 1862 taught a school; came to Illinois in 1863, but returned to Ohio, where he taught for ten years; entered the lecture field with bis brother, Thomas I., and traveled through Illinois, Indiana and Ohio. On Jan. 29, 1871, he married Miss Nattie Telford, of Chicago, Ill.; they have two children — Bertha L. and Elsie E. He worked at graining before studying for the ministry. On Jan. 1, 1874, was a convert to the U. B. Church; April, 1874, he was licensed to preach; joined the Bock Biver Conference at Polo, Ill.; in 1875, held a charge in Lee Co. one year, and came to Orangeville Circuit in 1877; has six appointments, and preaches three times on one Sabbath Day; has received 130 members into the U. B. Church since coming here.

E. S. WAGNER, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Orangeville; born in Northumberland Co., Penn., Feb. 14, 1833; located on Sec. 33, Oneco, in 1846, and remained till 1866, when he sold the farm to his father and bought this farm, on which he now resides, of William Hoffman; it contains 80 acres; he now owns 160 acres of farm land, and 14£ acres of timber land. April, 1858, was married to Miss Mary C. Hassinger, of Pennsylvania; has a family of five children — Ada M., Willard A., George S., Samuel G. and Ira J. Mr. Wagner has held school offices. Lutheran in religion.

WILLIAM WAGENHALS, retired farmer. Orangeville; born in Wurtemberg, Germany, Aug. 21, 1822; emigrated to America in 1836; in Philadelphia, Penn., learned the baker's trade; he farmed in Lancaster and Union Cos., Penn.; came West and run the Orangeville Mills for John Bower, in 1847, 1848 and 1849; then kept a grocery and drug store; sold out to Amos Benage in 1851; belonged to the firm of McEntee & Wagenhals' dry goods establishment; in 1865, sold to Lodigan Erb and retired from active life; now lives on his homestead; also owns 110 acres on Sec. 35. In 1848, he married Miss Susanna Sandoe, of Dauphin Co., Penn.; has no children; Mr. Wagenhals' was the first Postmaster, in 1853; has been Supervisor; is now President of the Buckeye Insurance Co.; he has two sisters — Louisa Hildinger, widow, and Christiana Mussacher, also widow. Is German Lutheran in religion; Democrat in politics.

THOMAS W. WERKHEISER, wagon-factory, Oraugeville; born in Northampton Co., Penn., July 3, 1849; came West with his father in 1856; also, two brothers — John H. and Nelson (deceased). In 1871, he married Miss Buth A. Wilson, of Illinois; there are now Melvin L., Ivah and Stella, and one dead. His brother enlisted in Co. G, 93d I. V. I., and served three years; Thomas W. was in Delmar, Plymouth Co., Iowa, in 1873, running a wagon-shop there; sold out and carried his business to Seney, Iowa; after two years there, returned to Stephenson Co.; in March, 1877, commenced business; his buildings are, main, 20x30, with paint-shop above, and an L 16x20, for smithing; his trade is increasing rapidly; the firm was formerly Werkheiser & Scott, but now Mr. Werkheiser is sole proprietor.

MRS. BETSY WINCHELL, widow, Sec. 32; P. O. Orangeville; was born in Erie Co., N. Y., Sept, 9, 1801; owns 240 acres of land, which her husband, Ira Winchell, claimed in 1840; they lived there since 1843; Mr. Winchell died May 19, 1879, aged 84 years and 14 days; was buried in Orangeville. He left a family of eight children — Susan (now Mrs. West), Clarissa (now Mrs. Hartley), Samuel fdied when 14 months old), Amos (died at 2 years of age), Emma (now Mrs. Walkey), George (now farming the estate), Hiram and Angeline (deceased). Mrs. Winchell has belonged to church for forty-six years, and, together with her husband, has always been identified with the interests of Stephenson Co.

G. W. WIRT, druggist. Orangevilie; born Sept. 8, 1830, in Lehigh Co., Perm.; family removed to Centre Co., where his father died in 1831, in month of February; he worked on the farm; then moved to Greene Co., Ind., and there went to shoemaking, opening a shop of his own; and in the fall of 18G5 came to Orangevilie, and opened a shoe trade; but, his hedth failing, he tried farming; but came to the village and entered the drug business, May 1, 1876; is the proprietor of a business worth about $4,500 per annum. On Nov. 7, 1853, he married Miss Elizabeth H. Stem, of Pennsylvania; they have no children. Lutheran in religion.

ISRAEL G. WISE, Principal of Orangevilie School; his father came to Stephensou Co. in 1844, and married Mrs. Fager (nee Chesta Grimo) in 1847, at Buckeye Center; soon after moved to Shuey Mills, Green Co., Wis.; it was during his stay here that his son Israel G. was born; on Jan. 19, 1849, the family returned to Buckeye Township, and here, in 1862-63-64, Israel G. learned wool-carding, but having prepared himself for the profession of a teacher, in 1873, went to teaching Orangevilie schools, at which he is now engaged; in 1877, he was Township Clerk; in 1879, Assessor, and on Dec. 26, 1871, he married Miss Mary A. Gorr, of Pennsylvania; they have two children — Carrie and John; his father, after retiring to the old homestead on Sec. 7, Buckeye Township, died on Jan. 14, 1869; his mother remained until 1879, when she also passed to a better world, December 13. Mr. Wise belongs to the Evangelical Church.

WILLIAM WOLF, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Orangevilie; born in Centre Co., Penn., Dec. 20, 1832. May 12, 1853, was married to Miss Mary Russell, of Venango Co., Penn.; came West to Stephenson Co., III., in 1866, in company with James Leeman, driving a spiked team; his wife and three daughters came in 1868; locat d on this farm March 28, 1868; the farm, which contains 160 acres, was bought from Wilson Russell; he has held township offices. In religion, Lutheran; the children are Rosette I., Harriet J. and Florence E.

DANIEL WOODRING, retired farmer, Orangevilie; born in Northampton Co., Penn., Nov. 1, 1810; at 16 years of age, he worked on the canal. In 1836, married Miss Catherine, of Pennsylvania, who died Sept. 28, 1856, on the farm to which he had moved on coming to Stephenson Co., in 1855, on Sec. 29, Range 8 east. In 1860, he married Sophia Lurch, of Pennsylvania, and in 1872, sold the farm to Jacob L. Hess, and moved to Orangevilie. Mr. Woodring has held township offices; was Comptroller of Highways in 1866, and is an Elder in the Reformed Church; out of twelve children, there are eight alive — Catherine, Daniel, Violetta, John E., Peter D., Uriah, Anna C, Luciuda U., Mary D., Emma R,, Eleanor and Adda M.; John belonged to the 46th I. V. I., Co. A; returned November, 1865.

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Remarkable Stories, Volume 1
by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a Licensed Massage Therapist and Life Coach. An amateur historian, parts of these stories and many more appear on his website, www.robertbike.com.

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WEST POINT TOWNSHIP

JACOB ACKER, farmer; P. O. Lena; born Sept. 28, 1814, in Mifflin Co., Penn.; he learned the carpenter trade iu Union Co., Penn., following the business until 1843, when he came to Stephenson Co.; he has followed farming and the carpenter's trade since coming to this county; he now owns 65 acres; part of this land is inside the corporation, and he owns other town property; he has been Justice of the Peace and County Superintendent; he was Postmaster in Lowell, Jefferson Township; he also was School Treasurer and Director. Married Amelia Himes in 1839; she was born in Union Co., Penn., in 1818; they had nine children, six living — George H., Mary E., Kate, Margaret A., Jane and Viola F.; George H. enlisted in 1861, in the 92d 1. V. I.; served about one year, and was discharged on account of sickness.

H. W. ALLEN, nursery and farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Lena; born Aug. 4, 1842, in Galena, Ill.; when about three years of age, he came with his parents to his present locality; his father formerly owned about 400 acres of land; part of this land is now occupied by the lumber yard, depot, etc.; they own now 80 acres, and he is largely engaged in the nursery business, consisting of fruit and ornamental trees, it is equal to any nursery in the county. Married Miss Cordelia Aurand, in 1865; she was born in Carlisle, Penn.; they have six children, three sons and three daughters. He enlisted in 1864, in Co. A, 142d I. V. I., as Sergeant, and served about six months. His father died in November, 1864, aged 50 years.

LEWIS B. ANDREWS, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Lena; born Oct. 9, 1850, in West Point Township; his father settled on this farm in about 1839; is now a resident of Cleveland, Ohio; this farm consists of 238 acres of land, well improved. He married Miss Lizzie Moffett, March 20, 1878; she was born in Jo Daviess Co., where her parents now reside.

C. T. BARNES, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Waddam's Grove; born July 3, 1813, in Prussia; in 1836, he came to Baltimore, Md., having followed the seas as a sailor four years, and one year sailed out of Baltimore; in 1837 he commenced to learn the cabinet trade; followed it until 1852, when he came to Stephenson Co., and has since been engaged in farming; he owns 171 acres of land; he has been School Director for the past seventeen years. Married Minerva Gathir in 1840; she was born in North Carolina, in 1819, and died in 1857; they had four children, three sons and one daughter; his second marriage was to Elizabeth Lutz, in 1860; she was born in Pennsylvania; they have three children, one son and two daughters. He is a Republican in politics.

WILLIAM G. BARNES, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Waddam's Grove; born Oct. 14, 1841, in Scott Co., Ill.; when a child his parents removed to Galena, Ill.; in 1852 they came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 164 acres of land; he enlisted in 1861 in Co. G, 15th Ill. V. I.; served to the end of the war; was at the battle of Shiloh, siege of Corinth and others; in 1868 he came to his present farm. Married Minerva A. Ferguson, in 1866; she was born in Rochester, N. Y.; they have three children — Charles M., Ida Mabel and Fred. Mr. Barnes is a member of the M. E. Church; he is a Republican.

R. BAYSINGER, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Lena; born Aug. 23, 1827, in Breckenridge Co., Ky.; in 1833 he came to Edgar Co., Ill.; in 1846 he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 107 h acres of land; is School Treasurer; has been Commissioner of Highways. Married Rachel Montague, Dec. 1,1850; she was born in Edgar Co., Ill.; they have three children — Charles M., Newell H., and Mary E. Mr. Baysinger is a member of the M. E. Church; he is a Republican.

DR. G. A. BOWES, physician and surgeon, Lena; born Aug. 15, 1830, in Dauphin Co., Penn.; at about the age of 21 years he commenced the study of medicine with Dr. G. O. Witman, and graduated in 1854, from the Jefferson Medical College, at Philadelphia; he entered the U. S. service in 1862, as Surgeon in the 36th Penn. V. L, with the rank of Major; he was located at Harrisburg, Penn., as examining surgeon; he served to the end of the war; in 1869 he came to Lena; he owns the three-story brick block, corner North R. R. and Schuyler streets, and other property in town. Married Miss Amelia C. Smith, in 1854; she was born in Union Co., Penn.

REV. F. BOWER, Sec. 10; P. O. Waddam's Grove; born April 19, 1819, in Snyder Co., Penn.; in 1852 he commenced studying for the ministry; in 1856, he was ordained to preach the gospel, and was installed in the Augusta Baptist Church, Northumberland Co.; in 1857, he came to Center Co., Penn.; preached there seven years; in 1864, he returned to Selin's Grove, Penn.; preached there two years; in 1866, he came to Missouri and engaged in the mission work two years; in 1868, he came to Lena and preached there seven years; in 1869 he was engaged in the mission work in Dakota Territory; in 1876, he came to his present locality; he owns 70 acres of land. Married Miss M. J. Smith, Sept. 12, 1843; she was born in Snyder Co., Penn.

ALLEN BOYER, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Lena; born March 29, 1819, in Union Co., Penn.; in 1846, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 246 acres of land, part entered and improved with substantial buildings; he has been School Director and Treasurer. Married Leah Jordan in 1840; she was born in Lancaster Co., Penn.; had eleven children; nine are living — Ezra, Isaac, John, Levi, Simon, Enoch, Anna, Sarah and Hannah. Dunkard in religion.

JACOB BURBRIDGE, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Lena; born Jan. 18, 1806, in Butler Co., Penn.; when a child he came with his parents to Kentucky, in 1827; they came to Springfield, Ill., in 1829; he came to Jo Daviess Co.; here he was elected Constable, and also served as Deputy Sheriff; he sowed the first fall wheat in Jo Daviess County; this wheat he brought from Springfield, Ill., in the fall of 1830; in 1837, he removed to Stephenson County, where he has since lived; he owns 150 acres of land. Married Martha A. Waddams in 1832; she was born in Ohio in 1816; had eleven children; seven are living — Elizabeth, Louisa, Lucy, Melissa, Julietta, Jacob and Wilson. Mr. B. served six months in the Black Hawk War; he is the only one now in Stephenson Co. who served in this war. Methodist in religion; Republican in politics.

WILLIAM CORNING, capitalist; Lena; born Jan. 25, 1818, in Rockingham Co., N. H.; when about the age of 18 he came to Lowell, Mass.; in 1842, he came to Jo Davies County; followed teaming, etc., till 1848, when he came to Stephenson County and engaged in farming; he owns 215 acres of land, improved, also a property in Lena; in 1870, he commenced the banking business; firm of Toll, Corning & Co.; they continued this about eight years; he is a member of the Town Board, etc. Married Mary B. Green in 1842; she was born in Newburyport, Mass.; they had five children; two are living — Elizaette and Adriann. Presbyterian in religion; Republican in politics.

A. S. CROTZER, firm of Crotzer Bros., lumber and hardware, Lena; born Feb. 27, 1846, in Clayton Co., Penn.; in 1857, he came with his parents to Lena; engaged in farming till 1864, when he enlisted in Company E, 92d I. V. I., mounted; served as cavalry; continued till the close of the war; they were under Gen. Kilpatrick's command; they participated in the battle of Atlanta, Sherman's march to the sea, Aiken, S. C, Wainsborough, Raleigh, N. C, Macon, Ga., and others; he then returned and continued farming and stock raising till 1873, when he commenced his present business; he is President of the Town Board of Treasurers. Married Miss Maggie Sechler, Nov. 15, 1877; she was born in Pennsylvania; they have one child, Mary. Lutheran in religion; Republican in politics.

FREDERICK DAMERT, firm of Damert & Walz, hardware, Lena; born April 28, 1842, in Prussia; in 1867, he came to Lena and started a tin shop; he has worked at this trade about twenty-four years; in 1874, he commenced the hardware business. Married Miss Elizabeth Sherman April 4, 1870; she was born in Stephenson Co.; have had four children — Emma, William F., Hattie C and Minnie D. Lutheran in religion; Republican in politics.

DANIEL DAWS, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Lena; born June 20, 1824, in Sussex Co., England; in 1841, he came to Jefferson Co., N. Y.; in 1860, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 138 acres of land. Married Miss A. Smith in 1847; she was born in 1826, in New York; died February, 1868; have three sons and four daughters; second marriage to Lizzie Lanterman, in 1870; she was born in Warren Co., N. Y. Attend M. E. Church.

THOMAS DAWS, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Lena; born July 14, 1815, in Sussex, England; in 1844, he came to Stephenson County; he owns 200 acres of land; has been School Director and Road Commissioner the past nine years. Married Charlotte Nevis in 1835; she was born in England; had thirteen children, ten living — Thomas, Mary Ann, Henry, Alfred, Sarah, Margaret, Caroline, Elias, Charlie and Adie. He is a Baptist.

GEORGE W. DELATE, deceased; late husband of Lucy A. Delate, Sec. 3; P. O. Nora; he was born in 1822, in Maine; died August, 1867; he came to Stephenson County in or about 1860. He married Mrs. Lucy A. Wilbur, in 1865; she was born in Schenectady, N. Y.; have one son, George G.; she has also one son by a former marriage, William E. Wilbur; he had three children by a former marriage, one son and two daughters; she owns 160 acres of land.

SAMUEL J. DODDS, attorney-at-law and notary, Lena; born Oct. 1, 1835, in Logansport, Ind.; in 1838, he came with his parents to Lena; he has been engaged several years in merchandising; has been Assistant Postmaster ten years; he commenced reading law in 1869; was admitted to the bar in 1871; he was elected County Surveyor in 1872; held this office till 1876; has been Township Clerk. Married Miss E. V. Rounds, September, 1858; she was born in Broome Co., N. Y.; they have five children — Homer M., Milton T., Delia M., Mary A. and Katie D. Presbyterian in religion.

J. T. H. DOBBLER, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Nora; born March 27, 1829, in Lycoming Co., Penn.; in 1853, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 200 acres of land, also a storehouse in Nora. Married Maria Hartzell, in 1849; she was born in Lehigh Co., Penn.; had eight children, seven living — Mary E., Sarah B., Clara A., John E., Eliza M., Cora E. and George F. Attend the M. E. Church; Republican in politics.

ANTHONY DOLL, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Lena; born June 17, 1840, in Canada; when a child, he came with his parents to Stephenson County; he owns 310 acres of land, also land in Iowa. He married Margaret Wendling, in 1867; she was born in Canada; they have six children — William M., John E., Rosetta, Olive M., Albert and Emma Mary. His father was born in Germany in 1799; came to Canada in 1834; he has lived on this farm since coming to the county.

B. DOLL, livery, Lena; born in 1836 in Baden; in 1851, he came to Stephenson County; he owns 200 acres of land, his stables and other property in town. Married Catharine Hater in 1862; she was born in Pennsylvania; they have three children, one son and two daughters.

A. M. DURKEE, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Howardsville; born June 3, 1811. in Cayuga Co, N. Y.; in 1842, he came to Jefferson Co.; there engaged in farming and merchandising till 1854, when he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns about 900 acres of land — 250 acres of this land in Stephenson Co. — valued at $40 per acre; he was appointed Postmaster in 1857; he has been Township Trustee and School Director. Married Miss Esther C. Stevens, September, 1843; she was born in Jefferson Co., N. Y.; they have five children — Augusta J., now Mrs. Durkee; Delaney M., Milton E. and Agnes E. and Willie R., twins; their son, Delaney M., enlisted in July, 1862, in Co. B, 71st I. V. I.; served four months; he attended the Eastman Commercial College, Chicago, and graduated from this institution; he is now studying medicine. The family are Baptists.

J. P. FAIR, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Lena; born June 15,1843, in Indiana Co., Penn.; in 1857, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 288 acres of land; he enlisted in 1862 in Co. H, 67th I. V. I.; served four months; has been School Director the past four years. Married Martha A. Montague in 1870; she was born in West Point Township; they have one child — Newel M. Republican in politics.

FRANK D. FITTS, farmer, Sec. 33; P. O. Lena; born March 14, 1854, in Cooper, Mich.; when a child he came with his parents to Chicago; at the age of 16 he graduated from the Chicago High School; he then secured employment in the Franklin Bank; he was afterward promoted teller, with full charge of the Savings Department; held this position about three years; he was then employed by the M. C. R. R. about eighteen months; afterward book-keeper for G. B. Swift & Co., and also had charge of the Hartford Life and Annuity Insurance Company; held this position till 1878, when he came to his present farm, consisting of 352 acres of land.

A. F. FOLL, capitalist; Lena; he was born March 25, 1835, in Bedfordshire, England; in 1858, he came to Lena; he first worked on a farm at $12 per month; he continued farming until 1860, when he removed to Lena; he then secured employment with Mr. Perrin, working in his warehouse; in 1862, he engaged in the grain trade; carried on this business till 1864; he then sold out and commenced the lumber trade in 1865; he again returned to the grain trade, and followed till 1870, when he started in the banking business; firm of Foil, Corning & Co.; they continued till 1877; he owns a farm of 120 acres; also a large amount of property in town, and has always been very successful in all his business enterprises. He married Miss Jennie Parris in 1863; she was born in Pennsylvania; they have four children — Adic, William, John and Frederick. Presbyterians in religion; Republican in politics.

J. D. FOWLER, farmer. Sec. 29; P. O. Lena; born June 19, 1814, in Springfield, Rutland Co., Vt.; May 21, 1838, he came to his present farm; he owns over 500 acres of land, part of which he entered; he has been Justice of the Peace, School Director, etc; in coming West they came by canal and lake, and occupied twenty-one days in the journey. He married Rachel Montague in April, 1838; she was born in Massachusetts, April 12, 1813; in about 1828, she came to Edgar Co., Ill., with her father and two brothers, remaining there several years; she then returned to Bennington Co., Vt., and then was married as above stated; she died Nov. 28, 1855. They had eight children, five living — Mary A., Horace W., Jelina, Eunice, Charles N.; Merritt died in infancy; James D. died Oct. 6, 1875, aged 25 years; .Julia died Jan. 22, 1878, aged 38 years. Mr. Fowler is a Free Methodist in religion.

THOMAS S. FRENCH, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Lena; born July 10, 1814, in Sullivan Co., Ind.; in 1813, he came to Wisconsin and engaged in mining; in 1834, he came to Stephenson Co. and entered 320 acres of land; he then returned to Wisconsin, and followed mining there and in Jo Daviess Co. until 1837, when he returned to his present locality; he owns 400 acres here, also 160 acres in Wisconsin. Married Miss Mary Kirkpatrick, April 16, 1840; she was born in Sangamon Co., Ill., May 20, 1820; they have eight children — George W., William K., Sterman, Joseph B., Eliza J., Mary, John H. and Perry; George W. and William K. served in the late war. Presbyterian in religion; Republican in politics.

D. W. FRISBY, farmer and fine stock -raiser; P. O. Lena; born Sept. 15, 1832, in New York City; at about the age of 19 he went to California and followed mining until 1856, when he returned to New York and followed merchandising about two years; he then went to Texas in 1860; he returned to New York in 1862. He enlisted in the 133d N. Y. V. I. and served to the end of the war; soon after entering the service he was promoted to Second Lieutenant, then Adjutant, which position he held to the end of the war; he then returned to Brooklyn, and soon after was appointed clerk in the Quartermaster's department, under Maj. Henry Inman, Chief Q. M. at Ft. Harker and Ft. Dodge, under command of Gen. Sheridan, during the Indian war in 1868. Mr. F. is well qualified to hold the positions which have been intrusted to him, he being well informed and an excellent penman; he has a large and well-selected library, and also a valuable collection of curiosities; he came to Lena in 1869; he owns 60 acres inside the corporation. Married Miss Elizabeth Dodds, in December 1869; she was born in Indiana in 1S32; they have one child — Otis Inman. aged 8 years. Presbyterian in religion; Republican in politics.

REV. A. S. GARDINER, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, Lena; born July 19, 1824, in Sag Harbor, Suffolk Co., N. Y.; in 1842, he attended the Clinton Academy at East Hampton, N. Y., under the instructions of Howland Davis; in September, 1843, he went to the University of the city of New York, concluding his studies at this institution in 1847; he then went to the law office of George Wood, Esq., of New York, and was admitted to the Supreme Court of New York in 1848; he then practiced law in New York City, Long Island and Fond du Lac, Wis.; during the winter of 1850-51, he was licensed and ordained by the Presbytery of Milwaukee to preach the Gospel; he then returned East in 1852; he accepted a call to the Presbyterian Church at Cold Spring, on the Hudson, where he continued a period of twelve years; he then came to Rockford; in 1878, he came to Lena, and became Pastor of the Presbyterian Church; he also has charge of the church at Winslow; he has been continuously engaged in the work since 1851. He married Miss Caroline F. Williams, December, 1852; she was born in New York City, Dec. 18, 1827; they have three children — Mrs. Charles H. Goffin, of Upper Mont Clair, N. J., a graduate of Rockford Seminary; Miss Julia Evangeline, now attending the same institution, and Irving L. Hommedieu.

SAMUEL GUNSAUL, proprietor Lena Hotel, Lena; born Feb. 2, 1812, in Montgomery Co., N. Y.; he was engaged there in merchandising; in 1842, he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; he owns a farm of 160 acres in Winslow Township, also the Lena Hotel; he has kept hotel the past twenty-nine years; in 1876 he removed to Lena and took charge of this hotel.

W. W. HALL, retired, Lena; born Nov. 8, 1822, in Genesee Co., N. Y.; in May 1847, he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since resided; he has owned about four hundred acres of land, which he has improved and since sold; he now owns 80 acres, and property in Lena, and other lands; he has been President of the Town Board, Assessor, etc; is a deacon of the Baptist Church, and has been an active member of this denomination since he was 18 years old. He married Sarah A. Goddard, in Stephenson Co.; she was born in Vermont; they have five children — Anna E., Albert W., Carrie E., Nellie and Mary L. Republican in politics.

JOHN HARRINGTON, farmer. Sec. 29; P. O. Waddams Grove; born in June, 1816, in Ireland; in 1836, he came to Quebec, thence to New York; in 1838 he came to Chicago; in 1842, to Carroll Co; in 1846, he removed to Stephenson Co.; he owns 140 acres of land. He married Julia McNamara in 1850; she was born in Canada, and came with her parents, when a child, to Illinois. They have eleven children — Francis, John (who has prepared himself as a teacher, and has been teaching school for the past five years; he is now teaching in Durand), Mary (also a teacher), Daniel, Julia, Edward, James, Eliza, Kate, Honora and William. Catholics.

JOSEPH HICKS, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Lena; born Aug. 24, 1820, in Ashtabula Co., Ohio; in October, 1840, he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; he first, entered 160 acres of land and improved it, then sold this farm; he now owns 110 acres; he has been School Director, etc. Married Lora E. Bailey in 1849; she was born in Cortland, Co., N. Y.; they had four children, two living Edward L. and Frank C.; lost two children in infancy. Lutheran in religion; Republican in politics.

HON. ANDREW HINDS, Lena; born July 25, 1822, in Lamoille Co., Vt.; in 1847, he came to Iowa Co., Wis.; in January, 1848, he removed to Stephenson Co.; he commenced reading law in 1844, with Solomon Wires, in Johnson, Vt.; was admitted to practice in 1847; he then completed his studies with Jerome Beardsley. and, in the following June term, was admitted as a partner; in 1848, he taught school in Oneco Township; in 1855, he was elected County Treasurer, and has held the office of County Superintendent about twenty years; he was elected County Judge in 1869, one term; in 1878, he was elected a member of the Legislature; he has held some other minor offices; he owns about 500 acres of land, and also property in Lena. He married Sarah Gibler in 1849; she was born in Highland Co., Ohio; they have eleven children — William, Ella, Laura, Louis, Frank, Jennie, James, Mary, Idella, Thomas and Joseph B. Christian religion; Democratic in politics.

B. J. HOLLEY, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Lena; born Sept. 1, 1820, in Washington Co., Penn.; in 1844, he came to Cook Co., Ill.; in 1846, to Lake Co.; in 1853. he came to his present farm; he owns 220 acres of land, and also one-half interest in 100 acres, occupied by his son; has been Commissioner of Highways; is Township Trustee. He married Mary Holbrook in 1843; she was born in Washington Co., Penn., in 1818; they have two children — George M. and Alice E.; he has been a member of the Baptist Church for the past forty years.

F. HOUSER, dealer in produce, Lena; born Sept. 11, 1842, in Mifflin Co., Penn.; when about 8 years old, he came with his parents to Stephenson Co.; he engaged in farming till 1872, when he commenced his present business. He married Miss M. E. Dobbler in 1863; she was born in Pennsylvania; they had three children, one living — Henry C. Lutheran religion; Republican in politics.

G. L. HOWARD, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Lena; born Oct, 11, 1822, in Jefferson Co., N. Y.; in 1839 he came with his parents to Stephenson Co.; his father lives on the farm he entered, and built the first house on this prairie, this house he still occupies, it was built in about 1841; he owns 55 acres of land improved, having built a stone house and other improvements; he has been Justice of the Peace, Commissioner of Highways, Assessor; has been Township Treasurer about 15 years. Married Harriet E. Bedford, in 1848, she was born in Jefferson Co., N. Y.; they had six children, two living— Christie Ann and Parker L. Mr. Howard is a member of the M. E. Church; he is a Republican.

MARTIN HOWARD, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Howardsville; born Aug. 10, 1820, in Jefferson Co., N. Y., in 1837; he came with his parents to Stephenson Co.; he owns 143 acres of land, which he entered; he was the first Road Commissioner in this township; his father named this Post Office Howardsville, and was the first Postmaster here. Married Elizabeth A. Stevens, in 1848; she was born in Jefferson Co., N. Y., they have five children— Nettie, Walter A., Helen, Charles F. and Edith. Mr. Howard is a member of the Baptist Church.

WARD B. HOWARD, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Howardsville; born June 27, 1822, in Jefferson Co., N. V.; in 1835 he came to Rockport, Ohio; in 1837 he came to Stephenson Co., Ill.; he owns 184 acres of land, which he entered. Married Malinda Kelly, in 1849, she was born in New York; they have two children — Fayette A. and Ruth.

GEORGE W. HOYMAN, agricultural implements, wind-mills, pumps, etc., Lena; born Oct. 2, 1838, in Somerset Co., Penn.; in 1855, he came to Stephenson Co.; he carried on the butchering business and farming till 1872, when he commenced his present business. Married Miss Catharine Bowers in 1858; she came with her parents to Stephenson Co. when a child; they have six children — Arthur, Lucy, Vinnie, William, Charles and Susan. Republican; Lutheran.

P. H. KAUFMAN, grain dealer, Lena; born June 5, 1827, in Shenandoah Co., Va.; when a boy he came with his parents to Missouri; in 1834 they removed to Stephenson Co., where he has since lived; there were but three white families in the county when they came here; he has always been engaged in farming till about 1870, when he commenced the grain business; he owns 230 acres of land and property in Lena; his father died in 1850, aged 53 years. Married Phebe Clark, July 10, 1854; she was born in Canada; they have three children — William H., Elsie and Bertie S. Mr. Kaufman is a Lutheran in religion.

P. S. KERLIN, agent Illinois Central Railroad and American Express Company, Lena; born Aug. 27, 1837, in Center Co., Penn.; in 1851, he commenced a general merchandise business in Fillmore, Penn.; he continued this business about fifteen years; March, 1868, he was appointed to his present position. Married Susan D. Bike in 1860; she was born in Center Co., Penn.; have four children— Willliam, Henry, Fannie and Charles.

Dr. W. W. KERLIN, physician and surgeon; P. O. Waddams Grove; born April 9, 1839, in Northumberland Co., Penn.; at about the age of 19 years he commenced studying medicine with Dr. P. R. Weggenseller; he graduated in Philadelphia in 1855, from the Pennsylvania Medical College; since then he has been in constant practice; in 1867, he came to his present locality; he owns a farm of 160 acres. Married Miss A. E. Smith, in 1856; she was born in Snyder Co., Penn.; they have two children — George B. and Anna. He enlisted in the 61st Penn. V. I.; had charge of a battalion; afterward appointed Assistant Surgeon; was at the battle of Richmond and others.

ADAM A. KRAPE, Superintendent of Schools of Stephenson Co., Lena; is a native of Center Co., Penn., and was born Jan. 10, 1843; his parents came to Illinois and located in Stephenson Co. in the spring of 1846; he grew up and attended school, and completed his education at the Wisconsin State University at Madison in 1862; since then has been mostly engaged in teaching; in 1877, he was elected Superintendent of Schools, and since then has occupied that position. In the spring of 1877, he was united in marriage to Miss Lucy R. Wasser; she is a native of Ohio, but grew up in Center Co., Penn.; they have one daughter — Lucy Catharine.

J. T. LEAMON, firm of Leamon & Emrich, furniture and undertakers, Lena; he was born March 23, 1822, in Union Co., Penn.; in 1857, he came to Stephenson Co.; in 1866, he removed to Lena, and engaged in painting about four years; he then commenced his present business; he owns 100 acres of land in Kent Township, valued at $50 per acre. Married Caroline Pauling Nov. 26, 1846; she was born in Dauphin Co., Penn.; they had ten children, six living — Anna M., now Mrs. Emrich; Alveretta, now Mrs. Weary; Robert B., Belle, now Mrs. Wilson; Kate and George. H. S. Emrich, of the above firm, was born March 28, 1842, in Center Co., Penn.; in 1865, he came to Stephenson Co., engaged in merchandising till 1876, when he commenced in this business; he owns 90 acres of land, valued at $50 an acre, also 160 acres in Dakota Territory. He married Miss Anna M. Leamon Dec. 22, 1870; she was born in Union Co., Penn.; they have three children — Birdie, William and George L.

JACOB LECKINGTON, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Lena; born July 21, 1810, in Juniata Co., Penn.; in 1852, he came to Stephenson Co.; he owns 175 acres of land. Married Jane Acker in 1833; she was born Nov. 17, 1812, in Juniata Co., Penn.; died May, 1852; have seven children — Anna, Elizabeth, Rudolph, Amelia, Ephraim, Mary and Henry. Second marriage to Barbara Hater, in 1857; she was born in Germany; have three children — Wilmet, Isaiah and Emma.

J. C. LOHR, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Lena; born July 29, 1834, in Fayette Co., Penn.; in March, 1870, he came to Carroll Co.; in 1877, he came to his present farm; he owns 120 acres of land. Married Mary A. Gerhart, April 16, 1855; she was born in Westmoreland Co., Penn.; they had seven children, five living — John F., William W., Albert W.. Edwin G. and Leroy O. L. He is a Presbyterian in religion, and a Republican in politics.

H. LOOMIS, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Lena; born April 29, 1816, in Litchfield Co., Conn.; when a child he came with his parents to Geauga Co., Ohio; in 1840, he came to Stephenson Co.; in the spring of 1841 he returned to Ohio; he bought a farm of 100 acres; in about 1852, he sold this farm and returned to this county; he now owns 242 acres of land. He married Miss A. Kelly, July —, 1873; she was born in New York; they have four children — Warren E., Sarah R., C. H., and Henry Charles.

W. W. LOWIS, editor Lena Star, Lena; born Feb. 10, 1846, in Spaulding, Lincolnshire, England; in 1850, he came with his parents to Janesville, Wis.; in 1852, he came to Freeport, Ill., and commenced the printing business; he was foreman of the Bulletin office ten years; in 1875, he went to Lanark, Carroll Co., and published the Carroll County Gazette; in 1878, he came to Lena, and has edited the Lena Star since then. He married Miss M. J. Newcomer, Jan. 6, 1870; she was born in Freeport; they had one child — Oristes, who died in 1875, aged 4 years.

JOHN McCULLOCH, firm of J. McCulloch & Son, foundry and machine shop, Lena; born Oct. 23, 1830, in Franklin Co., Penn.; in 1858, he came to Stephenson Co., and settled on a farm, where he remained until April, 1867, when he came to Lena and commenced their present business; his brother, Henry H, enlisted in 1861, in the First Pennsylvania Cavalry, and was killed at the battle of Richmond in 1864. He married Miss Margaret Bupp in July, 1852; she was born in 1833 in Pennsylvania, and died in 1867; they have three children — Emma, George H. and Ella; his second marriage was to Miss Susan Aul, in 1868; she was born in Ohio; they have four children — Isabella, James, Charles and Nina. Lutheran in religion.

DR. J. McFATRICH, physician and surgeon, Lena; born Feb. 20, 1829; in Mercer Co., Penn.; in 1846, he attended college at Meadville, Penn.; in 1848, he commenced a regular course at the Eclectic Medical College, and graduated in 1852; he then came to Monroe, Wis.; in 1854, he came to Rockford; in 1857, he removed to Waterloo, Iowa, and thence to the Rocky Mountains, where he remained until 1859; in 1861, he came to Lena, where he has since resided; he has been County Superintendent two years. He married Miss Martha J. Tittsworth, in 1854; she was born in Aurora, Ill.; they have three children — James B., now attending the Upper Iowa University, Fayette, Fayette Co., preparing for the medical profession; Mary E. and George W. The family attend the Presbyterian Church.

A. J. MACOMBER, general merchandise, Waddam's Grove; born April 4, 1852, in Winslow Township; his parents came to Stephenson Co., in 1835, and still reside in Winslow Township; at about the age of 20, he commenced teaching school, which he continued for about three years; in 1878 he came to Waddam's Grove and engaged in the stock business, then engaged in his present business. Married Miss Elizabeth Bell, Feb. 10, 1878; she was born in Hazel Green, Ill.; they have one child — Juna.

JOHN MAHON, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Nora; born March 24, 1836, in Harrison Co., Ohio, in 1855; he came to Stephenson Co.; he then removed to Jo Daviess, remained there eight years; in 1878 he came to his present locality; he owns 440 acres of land; when he left Ohio he first removed to Green Co., Wis.; on his arrival in Wisconsin he had but $20. He married Amelia Tilton, Feb. 20, 1860; she was born in. 1842, in Rochester, N. Y.; they have seven children — George, Mary, Ida, Cora, Nellie, Effie and Charles.

JOHN MASTERS, carpenter and farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Lena; born Sept. 30, 1843, in Washington Co., Md.; in 1854 he came to Louisa Co., Iowa; in 1857 he came to Stephenson Co., Ill; he owns 80 acres of land; he has been working at the carpenter trade since 1854. Married Miss Kreitzer, Dec. 1879; she was born in Lee Co., Ill.

JOHN METZ, druggist, Lena; born 1829, in Germany; July, 1843, he came to New York, thence to Wisconsin, with his parents; there he commenced the boot and shoe trade; in 1868 he removed to Lena and commenced his present business; when in Wisconsin he was Superintendent of the Poor House for eight years, this position he resigned; he has also been County Superintendent there three terms; has been three years Justice of the Peace, is now Town Treasurer. Married Johanna Hoffman, in 1852; she was born in Bavaria; they have five children — Lydia, Carrie, Bertha, Robert and Cora. Mr. Metz is a Lutheran in religion.

D. C. MILLER, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Waddam's Grove; born May 27, 1840, in Clarion Co., Penn.; in 1850 he came to Stephenson Co., with his parents, where he has since lived; he owns 180 acres of land, which he has well improved. Married Miss Rosetta Schudt, in 1860, she was born in Germany; they have three children — George, Augustus and Oscar. Mr. Miller is a Lutheran in religion, and a Democrat in politics.

MRS. ELVIRA MONTAGUE, Sec. 6; P. O. Waddams Grove; she was born Dec. 2, 1822, in Renssalear Co., N. Y.; when about 12 years old she came with her parents to Rochester, N. Y.; in 1856, she came to Stephenson County. She married Myron Ferguson in 1838; he was born in 1814; died in February, 1857; they have four sons and one daughter. Her second marriage was to Luman Montague; he died Oct. 6, 1875, in his 73d year; she owns 80 acres of land, where she now resides.

HENRY C. MONTAGUE, farmer; Lena; born Jan. 23, 1846, in Stephenson Co., Ill.; his parents came to this county in 1835, and settled on a farm just north of Waddams Grove, where they both died; his father died Oct. 6, 1875, aged 73; his mother died in September, 1866, aged 60 years; his father owned, at the time of his death, about 500 acres of land, which has been divided among his family; Henry C. owns the homestead, consisting of 260 acres of land. He married Miss Anna Drew, Jan. 18, 1870; she was born in Canada, Sept. 8, 1847; died Jan. 19, 1880; her parents came to Stephenson County in 1852; they have two children — Frank L. and Blanche E. The family attend the M. E. Church; Republican in politics.

DR. W. P. NARAMORE, physician and surgeon, Lena; born in December, 1825, in Seneca Co., N. Y.; in 1832, he came with his mother to Ohio; at about the age of 18 he commenced the study of medicine at the Willoughby Medical College, and graduated from the Sterling Medical College, Columbus, Ohio, in 1852, and has been in constant practice since 1846; he is the oldest resident physician in this county; he owns a farm of 240 acres, adjoining Lena, where he resides. He has been a member of the Board of Supervisors about fifteen years; he represented this county in the Legislature from 1852 to 1856; was also in the Constitutional Convention, at Springfield, during 1861 and 1862; he has held other minor offices. Married Miss Lucy A. Jones in 1848; she was born in 1826 in Pennsylvania; died in 1858; they have two children — W. W. and John M.; his second marriage was to Miss Mary Bower, October, 1859; she was born in Pennsylvania; they have five children — Milton 0., Martha L., Susan, Lottie May and George H. They attend the Christian Church; Republican in politics.

W. A. NEWELL, ticket agent and telegraph operator I. C. R. R.,Lena; born Dec. 15, 1847, in Huntington Co., Penn.; when a child he came to Ogle County with his parents; in 1870, he was employed by the I. C. R. R. at Macon, Ill.; in 1871, he came to Wenona, Ill., as telegraph operator; in 1872, he came to his present position. Married Eliza Griffin in 1870; she was born in New York; they have three children — Ina, Edith and Jennie. Lutheran in religion; Democrat in politics.

J. H. OZBURN, agent I. C. R. R. and American Express Co. and Postmaster, Waddams Grove; born Dec. 3, 1828, in Huntington Co., Penn.; in 1857, he came to Davenport, Iowa; in 1858, to Pontiac, Ill.; in 1859, he came to Stephenson Co. and engaged in farming till 1869; in 1871, he started merchandising in Waddams Grove, and continued till 1878; he was appointed to his present position in 1875; was appointed Postmaster in 1872; he built the brick store in Lena, now occupied by John Metz. He married Miss Elizabeth Stem in 1856; she was born in Pennsylvania; they have five children — Mary J., Sada J., John T., Maud H. and Nellie. Presbyterians in religion; Democratic in politics.

E. T. PERRY, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Lena; born Sept. 2, 1817, in Jefferson Co., N. Y.; in September, 1839, he came to Stephenson County; he owns 218 acres of land, part of which he entered; he has been Constable, School Trustee and Magistrate; has been for six years a member of the Board of Supervisors; has served as Assessor four years. He married Mary Howard in 1841; she was born in Jefferson Co., N. Y.; they have four children — Louisa, James H., Justus C. and Parker. Baptist religion.

D. T. PERRY, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Howardsville; born Dec. 25, 1809, in Oneida Co., N. Y.; in 1837, he came to Stephenson County; he owns 62 acres of land; he has been Assessor, has been School Director about forty years, and has been five years County Superintendent. He married Polly Howard in December, 1834; she was born in Jefferson Co., N. Y., in 1812, and died in September, 1878; they have four children — David H., Belle, Douglas and Emery; lost Martin, aged 7 years and 7 months; his second marriage was to Mrs. Bennett, in August, 1879; she was born in Kentucky; she has three sons and one daughter by a former marriage.

JOHN REEDER, proprietor of Lena Elevator, Lena; born Aug. 15, 1836. in Frankfort on the Main; in 1855 he came to Lancaster, Penn.; in 1856 he came to Freeport, Ill.; in 1857 he removed to Lena, worked at the brick-mason trade till 1861, when he enlisted in Co. G. 15th I.; V. I. served fourteen months; was at the battle of Pittsburg Landing; he then returned to Lena and carried on the grain business; in 1873 he bought the elevator, which he now occupies. Married Miss Elizabeth Lapp, in 1856; she was born in Summit Co., Ohio; they have eight children — Christie E., Helen, Alfred L., Frank, John, Arthur, Berdie and Irvin. Mr. Beeder is a Lutheran in religion; Democrat in politics.

WILLIAM A. RICE, farmer, Sec. 6;- P. O. Waddams Grove; born Aug. 14, 1847, in Cortland Co., N. Y.; in 1863, he came to Stephenson County; he owns 200 acres of land. He married Rose Satterlee in 1877; she was born in Stephenson County; they have two children — Katie and Star. His father was born Aug. 19, 1819, in Cortland Co., N. Y.; he came to his present firm in 1863; he owns 190 acres. Married Eveline Prince in 1853; she was born in Cortland Co., N. Y.; they have seven children — Frank J., Rectina, Berdette, Mary E., Edwin, George and Minnie M; he has two children by a former marriage — William A. and Ira D. Republican in politics.

SPENCER RISING, of the firm of S. Rising & Co., bankers, Lena; born Nov. 14, 1835, in Albany, N. Y.; when a child, he came with his parents to Oswego, Kendall Co., Ill.; in 1855, they removed to Rockford; in 1867, he came to Lena, and at once entered into the banking business; for the past four years, he has been Township Treasurer. He married Miss Mary Meslor in 1859; she was born in New Jersey; they have six children, three living — Rollin S., Kate C. and Frank K. Presbyterian in religion; Republican in politics.

CORNELIUS ROUSH, dealer in groceries, coal, salt, lime, etc., Lena; born May 12, 1826, in Centre Co., Penn.; in 1849, he came to Stephenson County; since 1856, he has been actively engaged in business; during 1860-61, he was engaged in the grain trade, in the firm of Gaylord & Roush; he has been Town Trustee and Assessor. He married Miss Adelia A Howard Nov. 13, 1853; she was born in New York; they have two children — Elizabeth and Fred. Lutheran in religion; Republican in politics.

CAPT. JOHN M. SCHERMERHORN, Postmaster, Lena; born May 17, 1830, in Fultonville, N. Y.; when a boy, he came with his parents to Centreville, St. Joseph Co., Mich.; in 1845, they removed to Stephenson County, where he has remained; he received the appointment of Postmaster in 1869. He enlisted in 1862 in Co. G, 92d I. V. I.; served to the end of the war, at which time he held a commission as Captain. Married Rachel J. Dodds in 1858; she was born in Indiana; they have five children — Finley F., Almeda, Nettie, W. W. and Cora.

AUGUST SCHUDT, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Lena; born Sept. 19, 1837, in Germany; in 1849, he came to Buffalo, N. Y.; engaged in lumbering and farming; in 1861, he came to his present locality; he owns 385 acres of land, which he has improved with a good, substantial barn and other improvements. Married Rosa Sharp in 1865; she was born in Wurtemberg; they have three children — Cornelia, Arthur and Otto. Lutheran in religion.

A. SHANNON, firm of Shannon & Co., carriage manufacturers, Lena; born May 23, 1834, in Centre Co., Penn; at about the age of 18, he was apprenticed to the carriage business, and worked at this trade about fifteen years; from 1868 to 1873, he held the office of Justice of the Peace and Conveyancer, Secretary of the Farmers' Mutual Fire Insurance Company; and in 1873 he came to Lena and commenced his present business. Married Miss Isabella Royer in 1856; she was born in Centre Co., Penn.; they have four children — John H., Sarah J., Anna M. and Oris W. Lutheran in religion; Democrat in politics.

LEVI SHERMAN, capitalist, Lena; born May 8, 1822, in Essex Co., N. Y.; June 1, 1850, he came to Stephenson County; he owns 200 acres of land, which he has improved, and has always been engaged in farming till he came to Lena; he has been School Director, Town Treasurer, etc.. He married, Oct. 25, 1847, Miss Harriet, daughter of James and Lovecy Fowler; she was born in Manchester, Vt.; they have an adopted daughter — Elizabeth, now Mrs. Damert. Lutheran in religion.

A. H. STAHL, proprietor Lena Steam Mill, Lena; born Feb. 27, 1821, in Perry Co., Penn., now Snyder County; in 1859, he came to Ogle Co., Ill.; in 1863, he came to Lena, first engaged in farming, and was four years in the lumber business; December, 1869, he took possession of this mill; he has been five years Town Trustee. Married Miss Catharine A. Crotzer Jan. 1, 1846; she was born in Clinton Co., Penn., Feb. 27, 1826; died Dec. 9, 1877; had ten children, five living — Mary C, now Mrs. Crane, of Freeport; Sarah E., now Mrs. A. T. Blodgett, now living in Boone County; William I., Emma and Elian Jane; John L., died June 23, 1879, aged 28 years; Clara, died April 13, 1876, aged 22 years; lost three children died in infancy.

E. STEVENS, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Howardsville; born Oct. 14, 1827, in Cape Vincent, N. Y.; in 1847, he came to his present farm, consisting of 180 acres of land, which he entered; he was the first Township Clerk of West Point, and has held about all the township offices. Married Miss Olive Bartals in November, 1851; she was born in 1830, in Jefferson Co., N. Y.; died in March, 1856; his second marriage was with Miss Elizabeth Haggert, Nov. 20, 1860; she was bora in Gloversville, Fulton Co., N. Y.; they have three children — Sarah, Jennie and Thad. Republican in politics.

Z. STOVER, firm of Sechler & Stover, general merchandise, Lena; born May 27, 1827, in Clark Co., Ohio; in 1855, he came to Stephenson Co. and engaged in farming for about ten years; he then engaged in live stock; continued this about four years; he has also been engaged in the hardware business about nine years; in April, 1879, he formed a co-partnership with Mr. Sechler in a general merchandise business; he has held the office of County Supervisor about nine years; has also been Township Assessor and Collector, Justice of the Peace, School Treasurer, etc. Married Miss Margaret Willard in 1849; she was born in Ohio; they have three children — Leora, now Mrs. Newcomer; Lodisca and W. Willard. Lutheran in religion.

DR. S. H. VERBECK, dentist, Lena; born Sept. 8, 1850, in Schaghticoke, Rensselaer Co., N. Y.; in 1873, he commenced studying dentistry in Gloversville, Fulton Co., N. Y., with Dr. H. H. Read; in the fall of 1874, he attended a course of lectures at Albany, N. Y.; in the fall of 1875, he went to Philadelphia and attended the Philadelphia College of Dental Surgery; graduated in March, 1876; he then returned to Gloversville and formed a co-partnership with his preceptor, Dr. H. H. Read; remained there till July, 1877, when he came to Lena and established his present business; he holds a diploma from the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery at Philadelphia.

JO DAVIESS WADAMS, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Waddams Grove; born Oct. 2, 1829, in Galena, Ill.; at the close of the Black Hawk war he came with his parents to his present location; he now owns 91-1/2 acres of land; his father died in 1858, aged 73 years; his mother died in August, 1878, aged 79 years; he was named Jo Daviess after the county he was born in, and is supposed to be the first white child born in that county; his father served in the Black Hawk war.

GEN. CHARLES WAITE, druggist; born April 1, 1837, in Orange Co., Vt.; in about 1840, he came to Genesee Co., N. Y., with his parents; in 1855, they removed to DeKalb Co., Ill. He enlisted in 1862, in Co. A, 27th M. V. I., and served to the end of the war. He returned to Sycamore, Ill., and opened a general store; continued this till 1869, when he removed to Lena and commenced his present business. Married Miss Emily Clement in 1866; she was born in La Porte, Ind.; they have three children — Charles C, Daniel and Frederick P. Episcopal in religion; Republican in politics.

CHARLES WALZ, firm of Dametrt & Walz, hardware, Lena; born Jan. 3, 1853, in Kaiserslautern, Germany; May 1, 1873, he came to Poughkeepsie, N. Y.; in 1874, he came to Lena; he first worked at the carpenter's trade, and afterward was employed as clerk in a coal yard; March 29, 1880, he formed a co-partnership in the above firm; he owns a house and three lots in town. He married Elizabeth Boehm, Aug. 1, 1876; she was born in Newark, N. J.; they have two children — William C. and Charlotte C. Lutheran in religion.

A. WEAVER, retired, Lena; born Aug. 1, 1812, in Westmoreland Co., Penn.; in 1853, he came to Stephenson Co., and engaged in farming until 1862, when he came to Lena and engaged in the lumber trade about eighteen months; he then opened a general merchandise business, the firm being Weaver & Sechler; this he continued until April 1879, when he withdrew from the business; he owns business and residence property in town. He is a member of the Baptist Church, having joined this denomination at the age of 21; his family also are all members of this church. He married Margaret Grossman in 1854; shp was born in Pennsylvania; they have five children — Samuel, William, Sidney, Ida and Albert; lost Jacob, aged 6 years.

MOSES WEAVER, deceased; he was born March 1, 1822, in Adams Co., Penn.; in 1857, he came to Stephenson Co. and settled on a farm in Waddams Township; here he remained until 1860, when he removed to Lena, where he remained until his death, which occurred Sept. 27, 1874. When he first came to Lena he was engaged as clerk for F. Rebor, in general merchandise; the following year he left the employment of Mr. Rebor and entered into the grain trade, which he continued until the time of his death; in the fall of 1861, he bought a stock of general merchandise, and carried on the business until 1863, when he closed out the stock and opened an agricultural warehouse; he has been a number of years School Director, and principally through his exertions Lena is indebted for the fine schoolhouse which is located there; he was also a member of the Town Board; he built and occupied the elevator which bears his name. He married Miss Fannie D. Hines, December, 1847; she was born in Franklin Co., Vt.; they had seven children, five living — Flora (now Mrs. Winter), Ada (now Mrs. Clark), Bertram, Sarah and Sherman; they lost two children in infancy. Presbyterian in religion.

MILES WHITE, general merchandise, Lena; born Feb. 17, 1841, in Jefferson Co., N. Y.; in 1852, he came to Waddams Grove with his parents; in 1865, he enlisted in Co. E. 7th I. V. C, and served to the end of the war; in May, 1866, he removed to Lena and started a small grocery; he now carries a large and well-selected stock; he owns the brick store which he occupies and other property in town. He married Miss Ellen Flemming July 4, 1862; she was born in Cumberland Co., Penn.; they had six children, four living — Wilbur E., Reuben Miles, Oscar C. and Herbert E. Baptist in religion; Republican in politics.

HENRY WINGART, Justice of the Peace and insurance agent, Lena; born Feb. 7, 1828, in Union Co., Penn.; Nov. 21, 1852, he came to Stephenson Co.; in 1854, he removed to Mt. Carroll, Ill.; in 1857, he came to Jo Daviess Co.; in 1867, he returned to Stephenson Co., where he has since resided; when in Mt. Carroll he followed brick-making and the carpenter's trade, also in Jo Daviess Co. He was elected Justice of the Peace in 1869; in 1870, he received a commission as Notary Public; he was elected County Superintendent in 1859, in Jo Daviess Co.; held this office until 1865; he then enlisted in Co. G, 39th I. V. I., and served to the close of the war. He married Elizabeth Hildebrand, Dec. 25, 1849; she was born in Union Co., Penn.; they had six children, four living — Isabella E. (now Mrs. M. F. Haladay), George E., Frank J. and Cora E. The family attend the M. E. Church; Republican in politics.

WILLIAM YAGER, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Lena; born Dec. 24, 1836, in Germany; in 1851, he came to New York City; in 1854, he came to his present farm; he owns 354 acres of land, well improved; his buildings are probably the best in the township; his house is built of brick, and cost about $4,000; his barn is 40x64, costing Si, 600, and other improvements which he has added to this farm since coming here. Married Anna Leckington, June, 1860; she was born in Pennsylvania; they have four children — Emma, Jennie, Hattie and John W. Democrat in politics.

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Remarkable Stories, Volume 1
by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a Licensed Massage Therapist and Life Coach. An amateur historian, parts of these stories and many more appear on his website, www.robertbike.com.

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ROCK GROVE TOWNSHIP

JACOB ASHENFELTER, farmer, Sec. 33; P. O. Rock Grove; born in York Co., Penn., October, 1808, where he learned millwrighting; he worked in Center, Mifflin, Somerset and Huntingdon Counties; moved West in the fall of 1847, and bought his farm in 1848, of William Wilson, containing 150 acres, valued at $50 per acre. In 1837, was married to Miss Rebecca H. Miles, of Pennsylvania; their family were Cyrus, who served in the 46th I. V. I., deceased; Susan, married to P. Dinges, deceased; Franklin, deceased, died from disease contracted in the army; belonged to the 46th f. V. I.; Mary Jane and Homer, at home; there were also two infants, deceased. Mr. Ashenfelter has held school and township offices; in politics, a Democrat; his family attends the Reform Church, at Walnut Grove.

EDWARD BARKER, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Davis; born in Franklin Co., Vt., Jan. 12, 1807; came to Stephenson Co., in 1842, and settled on his present farm, which he entered and now owns; it contains 140 acres. In 1835, was married to Miss Mary Warner, of Vermont; they have eight children — Mary, now married; Isaac A., Jay W., Martha, now Mrs. Williams; William H., Charles J., Theodore S. and Jerusha M. Mr. Barker has been Justice of the Peace, and held school offices; in politics, a Republican; he had two sons in the army, Jay W. and Theodore S.

N. J. BARIMORE, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Orangeville; born in Greene Co., Penn., Feb. 11, 1828; at the age of 13, removed to Ohio, with his parents, Joseph and Saloma Barimore; he lived in Ohio eight years, removed to Wisconsin, in 1849; from Wisconsin, came to Stephenson Co., Ill., in the spring of 1851; his parents came here in 1849, and, after two years here, removed to Wisconsin; they both died there, the father aged about 82 years; the mother, aged about 67 years. Mr. B.'s farm embraces 280 acres; 26»t in the home farm, and 20 acres of timber land in Wisconsin; he has held school offices, School Trustee, School Treasurer, etc., most of the time since he has been here; religion, M. E. Church; politics, Democrat. He was married in 1851 to Miss Susan Stair, a native of Indiana; with her parents, Jacob and Elizabeth Stair; came to Wisconsin in the fall of 1837, settling near the Illinois line; they permanently resided near the place of their first location in Wisconsin; her mother died about a year after their settlement in Wisconsin, aged 37 years; her father died in 1864, aged 64 years. Mr. and Mrs. Barimore, have seven children living — Saloma E., Frank G., Mary K., Jacob 8., Jennie, Bennie and Ruth Anna; two children deceased, William and Widdie.

HUGH BENNEHOFF, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Rock Grove; born in Union Co., Penn., Feb. 5, 1831; he came to Stephenson Co., Ill., with his father, Daniel, and the family; Rachel, who married Mr. Kuns, and is now a widow; Market, now Mrs. Reese; William and Daniel; they stopped in Cedarville, and Hugh went to Rock Grove, learned the harness trade; then he went to Jude, Wis., and worked at brick-making, and his trade; moved to Shannon, where he farmed, in 1864 or 1865; settled on the old farm on Sec. 25, where he owns 163 acres, valued at $55 an acre. In 1856, he married Miss Elizabeth Kramer, of Pennsylvania; their family are Mary E., Ida J., John W., Susan E., Charles F., William C. and a twin brother who died while yet an infant. Mr. Bennehoff has been Collector and Road Commissioner on the Republican ticket, and his family attend the Lutheran Church.

H. H. BOLENDER, merchant, Rock Grove; born in Rock Grove Township, Stephenson Co., Ill., Aug. 26, 1853; he was raised on a farm and at the age of 22 went clerking for Harver & Staver, in Monroe, then for F. S. Parlin; in 1879, he went to Rock Grove and established his present business; now carry between $4,000 and $5,000 worth of stock, with a steadily increasing trade. In 1879, he married Miss P. E. Holmes, of Green Co., Wis. Mr. Bolender's father, Levi, was born Nov. 12, 1822; his mother, Sarah Haas, April 27, 1834; the children were Henry H.,the subject of this sketch; Emma C, born June 21, 1855; David C, born Dec. 29, 1856; William, deceased, born May 23, 1859; Allen F., born March 1. 1861; Amanda J., born Dec. 8, 1863; Edward J., born Sept. 4, 1866; Ida May, born March 31, 1868; John A., born May 10, 1870; Jay H., born Jan. 11,1872; Clayton S., deceased, born Aug. 1, 1876.

SAMUEL CHAMBERS, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Rock Grove; born in West Buffalo Township, Union Co., Penn., Sept. 23, 1813; he came out West, in 1835, in company with his brother Thomas, on horseback, and stopped in Jo Daviess Co., Ill.; in 1836, moved to Rock Grove and bached with his brother, engaged, in the mean while, breaking prairie; he claimed and entered the farm on which he lives and now owns 190 acres; his brother Robert, who came out after he did, died in 1SJ4, and his heirs now hold the estate, and Benjamin, another brother, came in 1839, and farms on the next section. In 1841, he married Miss Elizabeth Musser, of Union Co., Penn.; born in 1819, May 10; their children's names are Joseph M., Rebecca E., afterward Mrs. Hessman, now dead; Robert T., Mary, afterward Mrs. McCalla, now dead; John J., Anna E., now Mrs. Brenizer; Benjamin F. and Nancy L. Mr. Chambers has held the office of School Trustee for fifteen years, Supervisor eight years, and has been Assessor on the Democratic ticket. He belongs to the M. E. Church, at Jefferson, Wis.

H. CLEVENSTINE, merchant, Rock Grove; born Oct, 16, 1821, in Union Co., Penn., and was raised in Center Co.; lived in Pennsylvania till the spring of 1857, when he came to Stephenson Co., Ill.; after a few months here, he took a trip through Iowa, and, in the fall of 1858, went to Wisconsin, where he lived for ten years; returned to Stephenson Co. in the fall of 1868, and has since resided in this county; was in mercantile business for some years before coming here in 1868, and for all of the time since that date; has been Postmaster of Rock Grove since the spring of 1873 or 1874, and has been School Trustee two or three terms; politics, Democratic. He was married, in October, 1869, to Miss Lettice Williams, a native of Pennsylvania; their children living are Hiram Albert, Cyrus Sterling and Emmert Christian; one child, John Henry, died April 8, 1880, aged 7 months.

C. J. COOPER, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Rock Grove; born in Bucks Co., Penn., May 26, 1810; twelve years later, his father moved West, coming to Clarke Co., Ill., where they remained eleven years; then bought and settled on a small place in Crawford Co.; lived eleven years there, removing to Stephenson Co. in 1844. Mr. Cooper first saw this region before Stephenson Co., was yet embraced in Jo Daviess Co.; the period referred to was when he was here as a soldier in the Black Hawk war, in 1832; in that war he was a soldier in Capt. Royal A. Knott's Company, 1st Regiment, commanded by Col. Blackburn, and of the 2d Brigade, commanded by Gen. Alexander, and saw the most of the war, of which so few soldiers yet survive. His occupation has been chiefly farming, though for a good many winters was engaged in operating saw-mills, etc.; he has 152 acres of farm land and 30 acres of timber land, all in Rock Grove Township. Held the office of School Director for seventeen years, and for many years also served in various township offices. In religious matters, he was born and bred a Quaker; in politics, he is Republican. He was married, July 28, 1840, to Miss Margaret A. Thompson, a native of Virginia; she came, at an early day, with her parents, Robert and Susannah Thompson, to Clarke Co., Ill., though they lived most of the time afterward in Crawford Co.; they came there about 1838 or 1839, her grandfather having moved there as early as 1825; Mrs. Cooper died Jan. 31, 1880, aged over 58 years. The children living are Robert T., Barton, Joseph, Margaret, now Mrs. N. E. Emrick; Susan L. and C. J.; two children deceased — Mary E. (Mrs. Jacob Fisher) and Harlan.

W. L. COOPER, retired, Rock Grove; born in Delaware, April 11, 1807; a year or two later his parents returned to Pennsylvania, having moved from that State to Delaware, and lived in Delaware only about two years; they lived in Bucks Co., Penn., until about 1823, when they removed to Crawford Co., Ill., and lived in Crawford and Clarke Cos. thereafter; his parents, Amos and Hannah Cooper, both died in Clarke Co., Ill. — his father aged 63 years, and his mother, about 60; his grandfather, William Cooper, also his grandfather on his mother's side, John Lloyd, both lived and died in Montgomery Co., Penn. The subject of this sketch was married May 10, 1831, in Crawford Co., Ill., to Miss Elizabeth Beems; she was born and raised near Williamsburg, Whitley Co., Ky., on the Cumberland River; she is a daughter of James and Nancy Beems, who were quite early settlers on the Cumberland River, coming there from Virginia, and both died there at the advanced age of over 90 years. Mr. and Mrs. Cooper have had eight children, seven of whom are living; those living are Ann (now Mrs. Daniel Thompson), Hannah (now Mrs. Valentine Haas), James, Mary (now Mrs. Jonathan Smull), Henry, Eliza (now Mrs. Charles Hennick), and Elizabeth (now Mrs. Franklin Boyd); the third child, George, died at Rock Grove, at the age of 18 years; in 1840, Mr. Cooper removed from Crawford Co. to Will Co., some nine or ten miles from Joliet; lived there one year; then came West, in 1841, the land not being yet in the market; entered his land from the Government, so that his farmwork was commenced here with the ground in its original state of uncultivated wildness; was engaged in farming until the last ten or twelve years, when, being too old for hard farm labor, he sold his farm, and has since lived in the village of Rock Grove; has a good house and lot, horse and buggy, and, with enough money at interest to yield him a living, is enjoying a quiet old age; he has done his part well in the affairs of his community; has been for many years a School Director, and has held various township offices. Religion, M. E. Church; politics, Republican.

GEORGE A. EMRICK, merchant, Rock Grove; born in Stephenson Co. July 2, 1853; has always lived in the county; has been engaged in farming; afterward moved to Rock Grove, where he worked at painting, etc.; since the fall of 1879, has been engaged in merchandising. Politics, Democratic. He was married, in 1878, to Miss Annie Cooper; she was also born in Stephenson Co.; they have one child — Bert C.

M. L. EMRICK, proprietor Commercial House. Rock Grove; born in Stephenson Co., in 1857, and has all his life been a resident of the county; in his boyhood was twelve years employed in the hotel with his father; was then two years engaged in farming; after this for two years was employed in painting; for the past six months has had the mail route from Rock Grove to Rock City; on the 1st of April, 1880, opened the Commercial House, and, assisted by his worthy wife, who is a model housekeeper, is keeping an excellent hotel, which merits and receives a large share of public patronage. In politics, Mr. E. is Democratic. He was married, Oct., 30, 1879, to Miss Mary E. Bolender, also a native of Stephenson Co., and a daughter of Adam Bolender, a well-known and highly esteemed citizen, who resides near Rock Grove.

JACOB FISHER, deceased; the subject of this sketch, an old settler and respected citizen of Rock Grove, was born near the city of Reading, Berks Co., Penn., in the year 1808; he was principally raised in Center Co., and lived there until his removal to Stephenson Co., Ill., in October, 1840, nine years after his marriage; his vocation was farming. He was a member of the Lutheran Church; in politics, he affiliated with the Democratic party; served many terms as School Director, and in various other local official positions; his death occurred in August, 1870. He was married, in 1831, to Miss Mary Moyers, a worthy lady, who was born in Lebanon Co., Penn., in 1807; the children living are John S., Jacob M., Mary and Solomon H.; those deceased are Anna Louisa, Samuel C, Susan M., Hiram W., William Irvin, and one who died in infancy.

JOHN S. FISHER, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Rock Grove; born in Centre Co., Penn., Feb. 1, 1832; came to Stephenson Co., Ill., with his parents Jacob and Mary Fisher, in October, 1840; has been chiefly engaged in farming, his home-farm comprising 125 acres; is the present Supervisor for his township, and has filled the same position several previous terms; has also been Road Commissioner, Town Clerk, etc. Politics, Democrat. He was married Aug. 26, 1858, to Miss Sarah Wise, a native of Union Co., Penn.; they have one child living — Emerson D.; three children deceased — Newton Bateman, Clayton Hamilton and Samuel S.

SAMUEL H. FISHER, retired, Rock Grove; born near Millheim, Centre Co., Penn., Jan. 18, 1822; was in Stephenson Co. as early as 1843, and was also here temporarily during each of the years 1844, 1847 and 1848; has been a permanent resident here since the fall of 1852; was in mercantile business as a clerk in Pennsylvania previous to his coming here, and in business for himself in Rock Grove up to 1857; for some ten years — from 1858 or 1859 — he was in the grain business in Dakota, in company with J. D. Schmeltzer, the firm name being Fisher & Schmeltzer, and, in company with his partner, put up the warehouse now occupied by the last-named member of that firm; except managing his farms, etc., has done no active business since 1868 or 1869. In politics, he is a Democrat. He was married in 1861 to Miss Catharine A. Mingle, also a native of Millheim, Centre Co., Penn.; their children are John H., Edwin J., Franklin D., and a daughter, Katie, who died at 3 months old. Mr. Fisher's ancestors were from Germany; on his father's side from Wurtemberg, on his mother's side from Alsace; they came from Germany to Berks Co., Penn., about 150 or 200 years ago, and he is of the fourth or fifth generation since their coming to America. His parents were Jacob and Susan Fisher, his mother's maiden name being Susan Haberacker; they first lived near the city of Reading, Berks Co., removing from there to Centre Co. in 1810; his father died March 29, 1829, aged 55 years; his mother died April 29, 1862, aged 83 years. Mrs. Fisher is a daughter of David and Lydia Mingle, who, with their family, came to Stephenson Co. in the spring of 1853; her father died at her house in Rock Grove, June 29, 1872, aged over 77 years; her mother died at the residence of J. D. Schmeltzer, in December, 1868, aged over 62 years.

SOLOMON FISHER, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Rock Grove; born in Centre Co., Penn., July 2-4, 1812; worked on a farm till 17 years of age; then for seven years was employed in the manufacture of pottery; since that has been engaged in farming enterprises; came to Stephenson Co. in the fell of 1839, bought a claim, returned East, and, in the spring of 18-±0, came back to Stephenson Co. as a permanent resident. He was married in 1843 to Miss Barbara Bolender, a native of Union Co. (now Snyder Co.), Penn; came to Stephenson Co. in 1840 with her parents, John and Catharine Bolender, who settled east of Rock Grove Village; her father, John Bolender, died Aug. 28, 1868, aged over 72 years; her mother, Catherine Bolender (maiden name Stees), died Sept. 12, 1866, aged 66 years. Mr. and Mrs. Fisher's children living are Catherine, now Mrs. John S. Walker; Henry, Matildah, William, Susan and Barbara; those deceased are Polly, Mrs. Samuel Askey; and Samuel, the latter dying in infancy. Mr. F.'s farm embraces 358 acres, all in Rock Grove Township; he has been always quite intimately and usefully associated with the growth and progress of his township; was first Town Clerk when the township organization' was effected; was School Treasurer for twenty years, and has held various other local offices. His politics, Democratic.

H. O. FRANKEBERGER, farmer, wagon manufacturer, etc., Rock Grove; born in Champaign Co., Ohio, Dec. 24, 1826; when he was three years old, his parents removed to McLean Co., Ill.; after four or five years there, moved to Bureau Co., and after residing there a year or two, came to Stephenson Co. in December, 1836; his parents, Eli and Caroline Frankeberger, both died in this county. He was married in 1857 to Miss Susan Kramer; she was born in Pennsylvania; when quite young, removed with her parents to Erie Co., Ohio, and at a later date to Illinois; her father, John Kramer, died in Carroll Co.; her mother, Mary A. Kramer, died in Stephenson Co. Mr. Frankeberger has 316 acres of land in Rock Grove and Dakota Townships, and, besides his farming, stock-raising, etc., has carried on wagon-making and repairing for the last thirty years; he was Town Clerk four or five years, and for the last twenty-three years has been Justice of the Peace. His politics, Republican. Children living — Corilla J., Roush, Nellie, Elmer, William and Oscar G.; children deceased — Annie, Clayton, Ai, Charles, Lolo and one who died in infancy.

OLE O. GARDER, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Davis; born in Norway, about ninety miles from Christiana, the capital, Sept. 18, 1815; while in Norway, he followed peddling; in June, 1842, he came to New York, then to Jefferson Prairie, Rock Co., Wis., and soon after moved to Stephenson Co., and bought a claim of L. Marsh, for $235; he now owns 275 acres of land; built his house in 1855, his barn 1877, and in 1842 was married to Miss Carrie Qvisle, of Norway; their family consists of eight children — Ole E., Liddie, now Mrs. Baker; Betsy, Caroline, Jane, Lewis, Helen, now Mrs. Patterson; Anna, now Mrs. Gadlset; an infant, and a child named Anna, now dead. Mr. Garder has held school and township offices; in politics, a Republican; the family attend the Lutheran Church.

MRS. HELEN GOODRICH, widow, Sec. 22; P. O. Davis; born in Onondaga Co., N. Y., Jan. 16, 1825; her father, Amos Wright, came to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1840, and settled with his family in Rock Grove. In 1841, she was married to Lemuel Goodrich, who came to the county in 1838, in company with his brother David; in 1840, he bought his brother's share of the estate, and settled down on the farm Jan. 27, 1841, with his wife; he died here in 1877, leaving a family of nine children living, and three dead — A. Jerome, Elora M.. Oscar A., Ella A., now Mrs. Potter; Alice E., now Mrs. Mather; Libbie R., now Mrs. Clark; Herbert E., George L., James W., Charles and Amos. Mr. Goodrich was well known and universally respected; his relatives and family now live on the estate, with three of their children, in the old home.

GEORGE HASSINGER, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Orangeville; born in Snyder Co. (then Union Co.,) Penn., Aug. 23, 1811; removed from there to Juniata Co., in 1834; lived in Juniata Co., eighteen years; came to Stephenson Co, Ill., in March, 1855; has a good, well-improved farm of 120 acres, in Rock Grove Township, with good residence, barn, etc., and, beside this, has 40 acres timber land in Wisconsin. He has held school and township offices; politics, Democrat; is a member of the Lutheran Church, at Orangeville. He was married, first, in 1833, to Miss Barbara Stees, a native of the same neighborhood in Pennsylvania; she died here in 1861. He was married again in 1866, to Mrs. Maria Cahoon (maiden name Gold), a native of Northampton Co., Penn. By the first marriage, there are eight children living — Philip, Jane, Mary, Alice, John, Charles, Emma and William; four deceased — Matildah, George and two who died in infancy. By the second marriage there are two children — Ida May and Martin Luther.

SOLOMON HOY, deceased; the subject of this sketch, a well-known and worthy citizen of this county, was born in Centre Co., Penn., Nov. 17, 1818; removed to Stephenson Co., Ill., in the fall of 1849; during his residence in Pennsylvania, he was engaged in mercantile life; after coming here, he farmed for over twenty years; then engaged again in mercantile business; retired from this about a year before his death. He was Justice of the Peace for a number of years, and, besides this, held various school and township offices; in politics, he was a member of the Democratic party; his death occurred April 10, 1877; his estimable widow, Caroline Hoy, maiden name Caroline Zimmerman, was born in Center Co., Penn.; married Feb. 20, 1840; the children living are Elizabeth Roxana (now Mrs. A. W. Kaup); John Shuman, James Buchanan, Fernando Pierrie and Alferetta J; those deceased are Franklin Sylvester, Thomas Jefferson and Catharine Eleauora. The home farm of the family embraces 200 acres of fine and nicely improved land in Rock Grove Township, including the comfortable residence property in the town of Rock Grove.

HARVEY KEISTER, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Rock Grove; born in Union Co., Penn., July 25, 1825; came to Stephenson Co., Ill., in the fall of 1848; carried on blacksmithing for over twenty years after coming to this county; since about 1868, has been engaged in farming; resides in the village of Rock Grove, and has a good farm of 160 acres adjoining the town; his laud being located in Rock Grove and Dakota Townships. He was married in 1855, to Miss Margaret Wise, also a native of Union Co., Penn.; they have had six children, three of whom are living — Benjamin H., Margaret and Flora; three deceased — Sarah J., Willie E. and Mary A. Politics, Republican.

LEVI KEISTER, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Rock Grove; born in Union Co., Penn., Dec. 31, 1833; came to Stephenson Co. in 1844, with his father Benjamin and family — Silas, Christopher, Jacob, Sarah, now Mrs. Buchanan; Catherine, who married Mr. Osborn, and after his death married Mr. Cromwell; Esther, was Mrs. Best, now Mrs. Arnold, and David; they stopped in Green Co., Wis., and then came to Rock Grove, Sec. 33. Levi learned the carpenter's trade, and in 1867 bought this farm of John Sass, containing 151 acres. In 1858, married Miss Mary Jane Runkle, of Pennsylvania, and has a family of five children — Elizabeth C, now Mrs. Carthoman; Amelia J., John G., Martha L., Anna L., an infant died; Esther (deceased). Mr. Keister is engaged in agriculture, having 113 colonies. In religion, he belongs to the Reform Church; in politics, he is a Republican.

C. T. KLECKNER, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Davis; born in Northampton Co., Penn., Jan. 6, 1819; in the spring of 1829 he moved to Union Co., and in 1840 came to Stephenson Co.; he then bought a claim of C. V. Kellogg, containing 720 acres, and now owns about the same. In 1849, was married to Miss Mary Gift; their family were David H., John J. (deceased), Isaac F., Mary E. (deceased), Sarah A., George A., Emma C, Ella J. (deceased), Phares O., Martin E. Mr. Kleckner has held many positions of honor and trust in the town, and has been School Treasurer for eight years. In politics, a Democrat; his family attend the Reform Church.

DR. D. H. KLECKNER, physician and surgeon, homoeopathy, Sec. 22; P. O. Davis; born in Union Co., Penn., Feb. 17, 1840; came to Stephenson Co. in 1840 with his father, C. T. Kleckner, and grandfather, till 1863, when he went to farming here, and at the same time studying medicine; in 1876-77, attended the first course of lectures at Hahnemann College, Chicago, Ill., and finished; received his diploma in 1879; returned and established himself on his farm, where he owns 125 acres. In 1862, he married Miss Mary A. Zimmerman, of Pennsylvania, and has a family of six children — Hiram S., Frank E., Lyman C, John H., Cyrus F. and Alice J. In politics, the Doctor is a Democrat, and in religion belongs to the Reform Church.

GEORGE A. KLECKNER, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Davis; born in Stephenson Co., Ill., Aug. 27, 1849, on the homestead; he worked at home till 1872, when he began for himself. Jan. 9, 1872, was married to Miss Clarissa J. Martin, of Green Co., Wis., and moved to his farm of 90 acres, where he now resides; they have one child Ora Grace. Mr. Kleckner was elected School Trustee this spring, 1880; he has held other offices. In politics, a Democrat.

JOHN H. C. KLINE, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Orangeville; born in Union Co., Penn., Dec. 30, 1845; his father's family were Susanna (now Mrs. Englehart), Sarah (now Mrs. Young), Maria (deceased) George, Rachel (now Mrs. HoflP), Lewis, David, Eli, Ellen ( now Mrs. Wells ), and the subject of this sketch; the family lived near Buena Vista at first in 1856, then moved to Sec. 28, in Oneco Township, where his father died in 1871; John H. attended school in Madison, Wis., and worked at carpenter's trade; finally went to farming; bought this farm of 132 acres of N. J. Barimore in 1872, and on Nov. 1, 1868, he married Miss Sarah A. Stair, of Green Co., Wis., and has three children — David Rollin, born Oct. 27, 1869, in Winona; Anna, Sept. 17, 1874, and George Wesley, born Aug. 19, 1877. Mr. Kline was Assessor in 1875, on the Republican ticket, and his family attends the United Brethren Church; is an earnest worker in the Sabbath school.

HENRY KLOEPPING, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Rock Grove; born in Prussia, Germany, Feb. 28, 1820; came to America in 1851; stopped in St. Louis, and in 1852 bought a farm of Cooney Otto, in Stephenson Co., Ill., of 175 acres. Was married to Mrs. Frederica Otto, a widow, and after her death, which occurred in 1879, married again in the fall, Miss Yetta Digner; they have three children — Henry, Mena and Mary. Mr. Kloepping has held school offices; his family attends the Evangelical Church.

JOSEPH KRAMER, veterinary surgeon. Rock Grove; born in Berks Co., Penn., July 1, 1808; not long after this his father sold out there and moved to Union Co. (now Snyder Co.), on the banks of the Susquehanna River; living there and working until he had gained a little money, the subject of this sketch then came to Lycoming Co.; bought a piece of land there in the timber, and lived there four years; then sold that and moved to Huntingdon Co.; bought a small mill property there, and operated it himself; lost his health by over-work, being sometimes in the mill for two weeks with no rest; on his physician's advice he sold the mill; then came to his brother's, in Seneca Co., Ohio; and from there, after a short time, to Illinois; coming into Stephenson Co., April 16, 1846; since which time he has been a resident of this county; paid $9 an acre for his first land here; carried on farming in connection with his practice as veterinary surgeon; has 228 acres of land in Rock Grove Township, besides two lots, a good residence, and 3f acres of pasture in the village of Rock Grove; retired from active farming in October, 1868, and has since done no business except the practice of his profession; has rented his land, his brother being on one part of it, his nephew on another. He is a member of the Reformed Church, and of the Democratic party; has quite frequently held township and school offices. He was married, in 1831, to Miss Susan Arnold; her native place was in Pennsylvania, and near the banks of the Susquehanna.

A. B. McCAULEY, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Rock Grove; born in Union Co., Penn., Feb. 11, 1831; when 5 years old, went from there to Ohio, and resided in that State until 1848, when he came to Stephenson Co., Ill.; has been engaged in farming for the last seven years; for twenty-three years before that was employed at blacksmithing, and does some work at that business yet, in connection with farming; his farm comprises 140 acres of prairie and 30 acres of timber land, all in Rock Grove Township; has held school and township offices. Politics, Republican. His mother, Deborah McCauley, died in 1860, aged 65 years; his father, Jacob McCauley, St., died in 1871, aged 72 years; his wife's maiden name was Mary C. Williams; her parents, John and Sarah Williams, came to Stephenson Co., from Pennsylvania, in 1847, and have resided here since; they live with, and are cared for by, their son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. McCauley; Mr. Williams having for years been an invalid, and thus incapacitated for any active work, or even for walking. Mr. and Mrs. McCauley have three children living — John, Laura and Sarah; three deceased — Willard, Elmer and Jacob.

L. L. MARSH, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Davis; born in Champaign Co., Ohio, Feb. 26, 1818; in 1827, moved to McClain Co., Ill.; then came here and located on Sec. 25, Range 9 east, and bought his claim of Mr. White, and entered one section and a quarter-section, making 960 acres. Of the original family there are but three living— E. J. is in Nebraska; Elmira, now Mrs. Miller, a widow, also lives in Nebraska, and the subject of this sketch. In 1851 he married Miss Mary Potter, of Indiana, and they had a family of seven children — Aaron L. L., born June 20, 1853, now dead since Dec. 10, 1862; Martha Sarepta, born Oct. 17, 1855, died May 8, 1875; Freedom L., born Sept. 27, 1827; Edward Hamel, born Jan. 21, 1860; Webster A., born May 13, 1862, Arthur L., born April 9, 1865; John W., born Jan. 2, 1871, and Sarepta M., daughter of iVlartha Hartman; born April 25, 1875, and died Sept. 8, 1875. Mr. Marsh's family attends the Lutheran Church. He is a Republican in politics.

GEORGE MAURER, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Rock Grove; born in Union Co., Penn., 1810; came to Stephenson Co., Ill., June 6, 1840, and stopped at Barber's house till he had one of his own. In partnership with John Bolender, bought eleven 80's and one 40, which they afterward divided. Mr. Maurer now owns 407 acres, valued at $50 per acre. In 1841, was married to Miss Elizabeth Bolender; they have a family of five children living — Sarah, now Mrs. J. Kennedy; Moses, Mary, William and George, and four dead — Daniel. Isaac, Harriet, John. Mr. Maurer has held township offices. In politics, a Democrat. His family attend the Presbyterian Church.

FREDERIC POTHAST, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Rock Grove; born in Prussia, Germany, July 16, 1825; emigrated to Philadelphia, Penn., in 1852; located on Sec. 33, in Stephenson Co. the same year; but sold out and bought this farm on which he lives, containing 118 acres, valued at $50 an acre. In 1852, was married to Miss Wilhelmina Schradermeier; they had a family of six children, all of whom are now dead — Simon, died Nov. 26, 1879; Mena, died September, 1875; Mary, died January, 1874; Henry, died Jan. 14, 1877; another son, named Henry, died in 1854; Frederick, died 1855. Mr. Pothast's family attends the Evangelical Church.

EDWARD PRATT, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Rock Grove; born in the village of Perry, Wyoming Co., N. Y., April 17, 1818; he worked at blacksmithing in Ohio for an uncle; went back to New York, and started with Benjamin Chadburn for Michigan, and from there to Chicago, where he engaged in driving a stage; in 1841 he came to Stephenson Co., and drove for Fink & Walker. In November, 1842, was married to Miss Eva Wright, of New York. He then started, with David Clay, a shop in Freeport; but in 1845 went to work for the Grand Latour Plough Company; his health failing he started on the road; went to farming in 1857. In March, 1871, bought this farm of J. B. Wymer for $12,000 (241 acres); now owns 190. Had a family of six children — Mary J., Marcus (deceased), James (deceased), Elias (deceased), an infant (deceased); Charles W., working the farm. Mr. Pratt has held township and school offices. In politics, a Democrat.

CALVIN PRESTON, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Davis; born in Union Co., Penn., Feb. 9, 1817; he learned millwrighting, and started for the West with his brother Wilson; came up with Abraham Snyder and William Furst, and then came to Freeport; he was engaged in the Davis Rock Run Saw-mill, Saulsbury am! Nelan Mills; also on the Wapello Mills, in Jo Daviess Co. He arrived in Stephenson Co. in 1840, and in 1843 married Miss Catherine Williams, of Pennsylvania, who died in 1873. In 1846, worked on the Cedarville Mills; in 1847, on the Lurch Mill, and, in 1848, on the Scioto Mill, but has settled down on his farm on Sec. 28, where he owns 140 acres. He married again, in 1876, to Mrs. McGrew, of Iowa; his children are Elizabeth, L. E., Alice, W. W., Mary M, now Mrs. Martin; Clara A., Sadie W., deceased; Lizzie W., deceased; Caroline K., Minnie M. and Amanda, deceased. Mr. Preston has held township and school offices; in politics is a Republican, and belongs to the Christian Church. His mother is now 91 years old, and lives on the farm with him; his father died in 1828.

LEWIS SCHRADERMAEIER, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Davis; born in Lippe Detmold, Germany, Nov. 5, 1821; came to America in 1853; brought his family with him and went to farming; settled down on a farm in Rock Grove Township, containing 150 acres, but owns now 500 acres, valued at $50 an acre. In 1844, he was married to Miss Sophia Pothast, of Germany. Their family is Lewis, Henry, Frederick. Herman, Louisa and Amelia. He has held township office, and belongs to the Evangelical Synod of North America.

L. W. SCHRADERMAEIER, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Rock Grove; born in Germany, March 26, 1846; emigrated to America in 1852, and settled in Rock Grove Township, where the subject of this sketch now lives and is engaged in farming; he now owns 70 acres and is farming 231. In 1868, he married Miss Dora Weimeier, of Germany. They have a family of two children — Anna S. and Daniel L. His family attend the Lutheran Evangelical Church.

W. B. STIVER, physician and surgeon, Rock Grove Village; he was born in Centre Co., Penn., March 12, 1850, and left for the West in 1872; went to Freeport and began the study of medicine; he attended the first course of lectures in Louisville Medical College, at Louisville, Ky., in 1874 and 1875; he then returned to Freeport and began with Dr. Buckley; then went to Orangeville and took care of Dr. B. H. Bradshaw's practice; afterward, he settled down in Rock Grove and began practice, in 1878; he attended the Rush Medical College, at Chicago, Ill., and received his diploma, and is now enjoying a good practice. In 1879, he married Miss R. E. McNitts. of Ohio.

JOHN S. WALKER, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Rock Grove. The subject of this sketch, a son of Col. George Walker, of Dakota, was born in Clinton Co., Penn., Sept. 25, 1845; at the age of 4 years, came to Stephenson Co., Ill., with father and family, the trip, made in wagons, occupying some five weeks; has, since 1849, been a resident of this county; has held school and township offices. Politics, Democratic. On New Year's Day, 1867, he was married to Miss Catharine Fisher, daughter of Solomon Fisher, of Rock Grove Township; she was born in Stephenson Co., April 15, 1844; their children are Willie W., Emma C, Stella M. and Charles C.

WILLIAM WINDECKER, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Davis; born in Seneca Co., N. Y., Feb. 11, 1848; he came West to Stephenson Co. with his father and family in 1851; the old family consisted of Israel Darling, “her son;” Susan, now Mrs. Dean; Charles, Hannah, now Mrs. Reed; J. C. and Mary. William stayed with his father, engaged in farming, till 1873. In 1872, he married Miss Mary Fosler, of Illinois, and has a family of two — Laura L. and Pearley. In 1863, he enlisted in the 26th I. V. I. and served till 1864; he is now farming 167 acres. In politics he is Republican.

DAVID ZIMMERMAN, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Rock Grove; born in Centre Co., Penn., Aug. 4, 1819; came to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1854, and settled on Sec. 27, Rock Grove Township, where he now owns 150 acres of land, valued at $50 an acre. In 1:44, he married Miss Elsie E. Ickes, of Perry Co., Penn., who is a daughter of the old revolutionary soldier, “Nicholas Ickes;” the family consists of eight children — Catherine E., now Mrs. J. Musser; Emma C., Andrew, Albert N., Laura J., Codella L., Saloma A. and Lewis E. Mr. Zimmerman has held the offices of Assessor in 1865, of Supervisor in 1868 on the Republican ticket, and belongs to the Presbyterian Church; in the Sabbath school he has been an earnest worker.

GEORGE W. ZIMMERMAN, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Davis; born in Union Co., Penn., April 8, 1849; he came to this county, in 1849, with his father, George, and family — Mary A., now Mrs. Kleckner; Katurah, now Mrs. Adlman; John, deceased in 1870; G. W. and Sophia C. George W. came to this his present location in 1850, and now has 207 acres, valued at $50 an acre. In 1873, he married Miss Nancy Jane Potter, of Illinois, and has a family of three children — Dora Ann, Jesse J., now dead; and John F. Mr. Zimmerman was School Director for six years, and is a Democrat; his family attend the Lutheran Church, of which Rev. Jacob Reidler is Pastor. The church was built in the fall of 1878, at a cost of $1,800; has a church membership of twenty-two and Sunday school of sixty-six. Mr. Z. is Deacon of the church.

J. H. ZIMMERMAN, farmer. Sec. 24; P. O. Davis; born in Centre Co., Penn., Jan. 17, 1S46; he came to Stephenson Co. in fall of 1849 with his father, Isaac, and the rest of the family, together with brother George and family, and Samuel B. Caldwell and family; his father died in the spring of 1877. J. H. now lives on the old estate, and owns 165 acres. On Sept. 15, 1864, he married Miss Margaret Kline, who died in the spring of 1877; he married again March 13, 1879, to Miss Liddie Breon, of Centre Co., Penn; they have a family of five children — Ida J., now Mrs. Breon; Henry Howard, Amos O., Mary J. and Franklin S. Mr. Zimmerman was Collector of Rock Grove Township in 1879; in politics, he is a Republican; his family attend the Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church.

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Remarkable Stories, Volume 1
by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a Licensed Massage Therapist and Life Coach. An amateur historian, parts of these stories and many more appear on his website, www.robertbike.com.

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BUCKEYE TOWNSHIP

JAMES H. ADDAMS, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Cedarville; born in Berks Co., Penn., March 16, 1850; came to Stephenson Co., in 1850, in company with Mr. Latcham; Samuel Adams his father's family consisted of ten children, of whom John H. and James H. are the only ones now here; James H. started for himself in 1844, having cried at an auction sale at 18 years of age. In 1843 he married Miss Livina Hinnersheetz, of Penn.; they had ten children, Alvin — born in 1844, and killed at Vicksburg; Agnes, born 1845, now at home; Austin, born in 1847, traveling agent; Elizabeth, born in 1849, deceased; Gustius, born 1851, now in Cedarville; Samuel, born in 1853, on the farm; Nathan, born in 1855, deceased; William, born in 1857, deceased; Charles H., born in 1859, now studying for a teacher at the Normal School; Lizzie, born in 1861, now at home; John H., born in 1862, at home. Mr. Addams farmed in 1844, then went into the grain and coal business, sold out, and came West to his present home; this house is the first brick that was built in the county; he now owns 167 acres; has held both township and school offices; is a Republican.

J. WEBER ADDAMS, stock-farm, Sec. 32; P. O. Cedarville; born in Cedarville, and spent his youth in attending school in the village; he then went to Beloit, preparatory to entering Ann Arbor, where he remained until he entered the freshman class, when his health failed and he returned home, and went into the flouring mills owned by his father, John H. Addams; then, in 1871, took a farm of 512 acres, which he now has stocked with fine cattle; he gives attention to some 25 head of Jersey thoroughbreds which he introduced here. In 1876, he married Miss Laura Shoemaker, of Lena, Ill.; they have one child, named Sarah.

J. B. ANGLE, farmer, Sec. 33; P. O. Cedarville; born in Franklin Co., Penn., in 1820. Mr. Angle came to Stephenson Co., in 1844; first located on Richland Creek, and then came here on to Sec. 33, buying his claim of Mr. Wingard; lived in a log cabin, and afterward built his residence; owns 280 acres in Sees. 31. 32 and 33. In 1843 he married Miss Bell; they have six children — Sarah, Luther. James, deceased; William, Newton, Nathau. Mr. Angle has been school officer, and was here when Mr. Epley kept the Cedarville Post Office.

SAMUEL and GEORGE W. BARBER, farmers, Sec. 32; P. O. Cedarville; were born in Union Co., Penn.; came to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1843; John Barber bought this claim of Barton Jones; the old Barber estate comprises 463 acres, of which the family holds 273, now on Sees. 31 and 32; old Mrs. Barber now lives, enjoying full health and faculties, at the advanced age of 81; the original family was, Mary B., born May 21, 1822; Samuel B., born Dec. 29, 1824; Sarah F., Feb. 27, 1828, now Mrs. Jackson; Thomas, born Jan. 6, 1831; George W., March 5, 1835; W. Henry, born June 17, 1839, died in 1878; Ellen S., born Feb. 28, 1840. On coming here they lived in a log cabin, and, in 1854, built the residence in which they now live; the family circle now being made of two brothers, three sisters, and their mother. Samuel and George have now established a fine stock-farm, and are breeding thoroughbred Jerseys, with which they have been very successful, and are now looking to the introduction of these fine animals into all the farms. The boys have belonged to the M. E. Church, and are of Republican principles.

THOMAS BARBER, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Cedarville; came out with the rest of the family in 1843; there were about fifty-four people in this party, the Barber family having three of the wagons; his father, John Barber, drove one wagon, brother Samuel one and a hired man the other. They landed in Rock Grove Township, and moved down to Sec. 31; Thomas has lived here since. In 1854, Oct. 4, he married Miss Patton; they have a family of four children — Samuel, George, Nellie and Sallie. Mr. Barber now farms most of the Barber estate, while his brothers carry on the stock farm. He is Republican.

ANDREW J. BATES, Cedarville; born in Green Co., Ohio, Jan. 1, 1838; came to Stephenson Co. in 1845, with his father's family, to Buckeye Center; in 1851, went to learn the carpenter trade of Washington Epley, near Davis, in Rock Run Township; he went West with Mr. Epley, but came back and worked at his trade till September, 1861, when he enlisted in the 46th I. V. I., Co. A.; in the battle of Shiloh had two fingers carried away; was discharged, in 1862, July 9; re-enlisted in 1863, and at Jackson, Miss., was struck by a spent ball; came home, and was married, in 1867, to Miss Anna DeLong; after staying in Davis five years, he moved to his present home in Cedarville. Mr. Bates is a Democrat. They had one child — Levi Gilbert, deceased.

JOHN F. BENDER, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Cedarville; born in Baden, Germany, March 14, 1822; came to United States in 1847; went to work in Buffalo, N. Y., and, in 1855, came to Stephenson Co.; he then bought this place in 1855, and in 1856 moved on to it; the old log house which he built at that time is now incorporated with the large frame one that he lives in at present; he owns now a farm of 102 acres. In 1847, he married Miss Frederica Rude, and has a family of eight children — Charles F., Anna E.. in Sterling; Mary, now Mrs. Wofesberger; John, William, Aaron, Ida and Edward. Mr. Bender is a Democrat.

JOHN M. BIKE, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 23; P. O. Buena Vista; born Lancaster County, Penn., November 8, 1823; son of William Peter Bike and Esther Reeser Bike; married Mary M. Snyder, born July 28, 1828, died October 20, 1877; moved from Center County, Pennsylvania in 1848 with covered wagon and oxen. The trip took six weeks. Coming across what is now Chicago, was swamp land, involving driving wagon onto planks, prying planks from mud and laying them down in front of the wheels. Coming through mud took two weeks. Owns 80 acres; original patent title signed by James K. Polk. Son William P. Bike born 1853. Republican.

WILLIAM P. BIKE, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 23; P. O. Buena Vista; born on the family farm in Buckeye Township, Stephenson County, Ill., on July 22, 1853; son of John Matthias Bike and Mary M. Snyder Bike; unmarried; working on the family farm. Republican.

JOHN BOALS, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. Fountain Creek; born in Donegal Co., Ireland, 1817; April 16, 1842, arrived in America; he was 25 years old on leaving New York; there were two sisters with him — Mary, now deceased, and Catherine, now Mrs. Jenkins; their passage over the lake resulted very nearly in a shipwreck; from Chicago, they came to Freeport, and went out to stay at John Wilson's, on Sec. 28; took an 80 on Sec. 30, and, when his father came West, entered it in 1843, and an additional 160 acres in 1844; the old family consisted of Jane, Sarah, now deceased; Nancy, Latitia and Thomas. In 1853, married Miss Beattie and located on the farm where they live now; owns 170 acres in Sees. 16 and 21. Mr. Boals' family consists of Agnes, deceased; Margaret, deceased; Robert, deceased; Josephine, deceased; M. Ida, now Mrs. Jaeger; Sarah, Elizabeth, William, Samuel, Latitia, Thomas and James, deceased. He is a Democrat, and belongs to the Presbyterian Church.

REUBEN BOBB, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Orangeville; born in Union Co., Penn., Aug. 25, 1841; came West with his father's family in 1845; went to Orangeville first, then here on to the homestead in 1846; now owns 93 acres; was engaged at farming till 1864, when he enlisted in the 32d I. V. I.; he was taken prisoner at Tunnel Hill, and nearly starved to death in Florence, S. C, and saw Gov. Dick Oglesby at Camp Butler reprove the commissary for issuing bones for the boys' rations; came home, and in Sept. 24, 1865, married Miss Amanda Reager, of Pennsylvania; his children are — Melly E., Ida M. and Boyd W.; has held school office; belongs to the M. E. Church.

FREDERICK BOLENDER, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Buena Vista; born in Union Co., Penn., Dec. 29, 1814; came to Stephenson Co. in company with Mr. Haas and Mr. Templeton; stayed in Rock Grove till June 13. and last of July entered his claim, which he had purchased of Jacob Brown, consisting of 240 acres; now, however, increased to 300 acres; he built his present residence in 1850. Has been married three times; in 1836, to Miss Ritzman, of Pennsylvania, who died in 1852; in 1853, to Miss Caroline Edwards, of Pennsylvania, who died in 1878; in November, 1879, to Miss Diana Bogar, of Union Co., Penn.; they have six children — Harriet E., now Mrs. Fry; George. Hannah, now Mrs. Kimball; Jane, now Mrs. Yagle; Ada, now Mrs. Etzler, and Wilson, now dead. Mr. Bolender has held most of the township offices; belongs to the Reform Church; is a Democrat.

JOHN BRUCE, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Cedarville; born in 1855, in New Jersey; came West when 3 years old, and with his father lived on Robert Schofield's place; then moved to Mr. Wilson's, on Sec. 21; they lived with Mr. Hixon and then with Adrian Lucas; this was in 1858, and they have stayed ever since, and with his father own this property. He married Miss Lucas in December, 1879; she was born in Pennsylvania; his father, William Bruce, was married in 1863; now visiting his old home in Pennsylvania.

BOYD H. BRUNDAGE, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Buckeye Center; came to the county in 1866, and settled in Buena Vista with his father, well known as Dr. Brundage; he left home, and went to farming at Milledgeville; but returned home, and then c^me here and settled on Sees. 12 and 13, where he now has a 40-acre farm. On Feb. 4, 1879, he married Miss Frederick. He is a Republican, and is one of a family of seven children, only two being at home — Albert and Delia.

DR. CHARLES BRUNDAGE, born in Luzerne Co., Penn., April 10, 1825; studied medicine in Castleton, Vt.; graduated in 1847; practiced in his native county, then in Union, and finally came West to Stephenson Co., and established himself in Buena Vista, 1866, where he remained till 1880; in the spring, he moved on to his farm, on Sec. 11, of 80 acres. In 1851, married Miss Andrews, of Pennsylvania, and has a family of seven children — F. M., a physician, in Luzerne Co., Penn.; Boyd H., Duke A.. Moses S., Dora E., now Mrs. Radler; Delia and Albert at home. Republican in politics.

J. B. CLINGMAN, Cedarville; born in Pennsylvania, May 12, 1803; in his youth he was disabled by hip disease, and his future life was one in which scholarly acquirements enabled him to secure a competency; in 1804, his father's family moved to Scioto Co., Ohio; at the age of 18 he went into the Recorder's office, but on account of his health, in 1825, he was Tax Collector of Scioto Co., and then engaged in real estate speculation, where he made money, and came into Illinois, a healthy climate; in 1836, entered land in La Salle Co., and in 1840 came to Stephenson Co. and settled on Sec. 25, Buckeye Township; owns 120 acres and property in Cedarville. Mr. Clingman first married in 1828, to Miss Sarah P. Turner, of Ohio; had a family of nine; his wife was killed by the falling of an old shed April 22, 1863; he married again on June 14, 1866, Miss Sarah Boyer, and had two children; his last wife died May 28, 1877. His sons served in the army, and at one time there were fourteen by the name of Clingman enlisted. J. B. is a Republican, and belongs to the M. E. Church.

MRS. JOSIAH CLINGMAN, Cedarville; came to the State of Illinois, in 18 i5, with her husband and family; settled first at Peoria, Putnam Co., where they stayed till 1836, then moved into La Salle Co., and from there to this county in 1837 their first stopping-place was Troy Grove; afterward, Mr. Clingman bought a farm of 320 acres of Mr. Demmick, where he lived until the year of his death, March 30, 1865; his widow moved into the village of Cedarville, where, together with her daughter, she now keeps house. Nov. 25, 1830, Josiah Clingman married Miss Maria Simpson, in Scioto Co., Ohio, the ceremony performed by the Rev. Asa Bolinger; their family numbered ten children — George W., deceased; Mary, now Mrs. M. G. Leitts; Chester, deceased; Ann Eliza, living with her mother; Thomas S., was wounded at Shiloh, and died two weeks after getting home; Jason, living north of Dakota; William M., now lives on the homestead farm; Edwin, deceased; Sophia, now Mrs. L. Angle; Ethel B., lives on Thomas Bell's farm. Josiah's brother, John B. Clingman, lives in Cedarville also. The widow of Josiah, the subject of this sketch, was born in Scioto Co., Ohio, November, 1809, and is at present writing in her 71st year.

JACOB F. DOERFLINGER, tailor, Cedarville; born in Baden, Germany, October, 1819; came to America in 1853, landed in New York, and went to Buffalo, then came here, and is engaged at his trade, which he learned in the Old Country; in summer time, gives his attention to raising tobacco; owns house and lots on which he lives. In 1856, married Miss Anna Rosche, of Switzerland; has a family of four children — Anna, now Mrs. Boldenberg; Louisa, now Mrs. Workinger; Amelia, now Mrs. Ilgen; and one boy named Christian.

REV. GEORGE J. DONMEYER, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Buckeye Centre; born in Centre Co., Penn., June 17, 1814; he was sent out by the Lutheran Church, in 1850, to Stephenson Co., as missionary; he was educated for the ministry in Pennsylvania College, going through a theological and literary course, taking charge of his first mission, in 1842, in Center Co.; when coming West, he experienced the many difficulties common to pioneer travel, arriving, May 8, some three miles north of Lena; preached his first sermon May 12, 1850, in the old schoolhouse where Fair's Church now stands; organized a Sabbath school here also. June 2, same year; at this time the total membership of the Lutheran Church was 181, in Stephenson Co.; the Rev. George J. Donmeyer is now giving his attention to horticulture; owns 85 acres. His family consists of Melinda, now Mrs. Cameron; Addison G., who during the war belonged to Co. H, now at home; Mary; Lizzie, deceased; during life a talented musician; George, Cyrus, Luther, Laura, deceased, and Jacob U. Republican in politics; Lutheran in religion.

ADAM EPLEY, farmer, Sec. 18, P. O. Buckeye Center; born September 9, 1818; raised on farm in Center Co. Penn; has two brothers in Stephenson County — Benjamin in Davis; John in Sec. 27; and a brother in Kansas, James; married Elizabeth Folgate, born December 18, 1822; they have a daughter, Annetta, born November 26, 1858, at home; farms 120 acres.

JOHN EPLEY, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Cedarville; born in Berks Co., Penn., Aug. 14, 1825; was raised in Center Co. on a farm; came to Stephenson Co. in 1841, June 6; went into the Cedar Creek flouring-mills, which then belonged to his brother Conrad, where he stayed till November of 1851, and on account of poor health, in spring of 1852, went to California; came back in 1860, and lived with wife's father, on Sec. 24, till 1865, when he bought his present home on Sec. 27. consisting of 87 acres. In 1847, he married Miss Anna Brown, of Pennsylvania, and had a family of five — Kate, now Mrs. Jackson; Alice, Cora, Anna L. and John. He married a second time to Mrs. Deppen, formerly Miss Snyder, her child being named Mabel Deppen. Mr. Epley served as Justice of the Peace in 1850 and 1861; belongs to the Evangelical Church of Cedarville. He has three brothers — Benjamin, living at Davis, in this county; James, now in Kansas; Adam, now in this township on Sec. 18.

SAMUEL ERMOLD, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Buckeye Center; born in Center Co., Penn., January, 1827; he came here to Stephenson Co. in 1840; in the spring of 1840, his father, George Ermold, bought land in the old Parriott claim, and then of Kretzer, and some of Folgate, having about 440 acres, in 1843; the old family
were Hannah, deceased; Samuel, subject of this sketch; Solomon, John G. and Rueben deceased; father died in the fall of 1844, and mother in the spring of 1857; Samuel was 13 years old when they came to the county, and stayed with his father until beginning for himself. In 1856, he married Miss Fager, and, in 1858, now owns a large farm on different adjoining sections, of 235 acres, valued at $50 an acre; the farm has been greatly improved; in 1858, he built the residence and large barn the following year; his family consists of two children — Oscar J. and Florentine M. Mr. Ermold has been Road Commissioner; Collector in 1862, and also School Trustee.

JACOB FOLGATE, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Buckeye Center; born in 1840, in Center Co., Penn.; when a year old, came to Stephenson Co. with his parents; owns 100 acres of land; was Postmaster from 1874 to 1876; he opened a store in 1874; sold out this business in 1876. He married Miss DeLong, in 1865; they have five children — Margaret C, Carrie, Mary A., Laura L. and Levi D. Democrat in politics; attends Evangelical Church.

JAMES FOLGATE, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Fountain Creek; born June 22, 1830; came to Stephenson Co., in 1841, with mother, father and family often children, seven boys and three girls; settled at Buckeye Center, and in 1851 located on Sec. 8, then to Brush Creek, Sec. 7; bought a farm of 185 acres, and in 1875, built a fine brick dwelling, costing $2,000. In 1851, he married Miss Matten and now has four children — Jonathan, Isaac, Uriah and William. Mr. Folgate is a Democrat; he is now giving some attention to Chester White and Berkshire.

JOHN FOX, miller, Cedarville; born in York Co., Penn., in 1836, and began milling in 1856. at 20 years of age, and while at his vocation has been working for Keystone Creek Mill; then for John Sloat; on Kritz Creek for Liphart & Rudy; in 1859, he went to the old stand again, and then to a mill on Canoe Run, owned by George Crumlinger, and in 1862, left for the West, but returned to Pennsylvania, and at different times worked, for these same men; he visited Cedarville first in 1871, and has now run the Cedar Creek Mills four years. In 1865, married Amanda Liphart; has a family of six children — James, William, Elizabeth S., John D., Charles and Adeline. Mr. Fox belonged to the 195th Penn. V. I.

JOHN T. GINGRICH, farmer. Sec. 6; P. O. Orangeville; born in Lebanon Co., June 13, 1823; came to Stephenson Co., in 1846; bought a claim of George Charter, entered it in the same year; owns 172 acres. In 1852, Sept. 28, he married Miss W. Viola Wick, of Pennsylvania, and in 1858, July 1, to Miss Livinia C. Lattig, of Pennsylvania; has a family of two, John B., born Sept. 16, 1860, and Anna M., born Sept. 25, 1862. Mr. Gingrich is fond of preserving the records of the farm; has a Bible over 100 years of age; he has held township and school offices; attends the Reform Church; Republican in politics.

DANIEL GRIM, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Orangeville; born in Center Co., Penn., in 1821; came to Stephenson Co., in 1845, in company with Benjamin Rousch; worked in the harve-t fields of Ohio, and for Joshua Fowler, near Lena, in Waddams Township; in 1845, Mr. Grim learned blacksmithing, in Mifflin Co., and worked on the White Hall Mills, for Philip Reitzell; he went back to Pennsylvania in 1849, and married Miss Amelia Rousch; came back to Buena Vista, stayed till coming on to this farm of 143 acres; their children are Amanda, now Mrs. Smith; Mary A., now Mrs. Hockman; Salina, now Mrs. Kramer; Sirus, Rosette, now Mrs. Shauk; Daniel, and John. Mr. Grim is a Republican in politics, and a Lutheran in religion.

WILLIAM D. HARTMAN, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Orangeville; born in Union Co., Penn., Oct. 22, 1836; came to Stephenson Co., in 1857; father's family were Magdalena, deceased; Mary A., now Mrs. Robendoll; Elizabeth, now Mrs. Young; Franklin, and Bebecca, now Mrs. Beair; he owns 170 acres. In 1869, March 7, married Miss Caroline Epley; their children are Madrona S., deceased; Frank W. Perry O., Beatta E., William W., Anna C. William D.'s brother Franklin was shot through the leg at Ft. Donelson, and bled to death; Republican in politics.

GEORGE W. HARTSOUGH, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Cedarville; born in Seneca Co., N. Y., in 1821; when a young man, he clerked and taught school in Union Co., Penn.; taught the Deisbach School four years, from 1840 to 1844; he spent one year in New York before coming West; arrived in Stephenson Co. in 1845; however, before leaving Pennsylvania he married Miss Scheckler, and on locating selected Rock Grove; his wife has three brothers in the county — Levi, who lives in Rock Grove; Peter, who lives in Orangeville, is a gunsmith, and Benjamin, who lives in Waddams. Mr. Hartsough then went to teaching school, and continued through 1846-48; then seeing a chance bought a woolen-mill near Oneco, which he ran for six years; but in 1856 sold out the concern to Samuel Runkle, then going into the mercantile business; he also was Postmaster till 1860; disposed of these interests. Went to recruiting Co. G, 93d I. V. I, and served a few months in this company as First Lieutenant; but, his health failing, was compelled to return home; then going into a woolen-mill in La Fayette Co., Wis., which he ran until he moved on to this farm, Sec. 30, in 1869. In public life, he has served as Commissioner, Justice of the Peace, Coroner, and in school offices. As Justice he was elected Nov. 23, 1852; he held this office for twenty-one years; his papers bear the signatures of William Preston, County Clerk, and Hon. A. C. French, Governor of the State of Illinois. Among the marriages he made, the first was Mr. Davidson to Miss Van Winkle, and Solomon Kleckner to Eliza Ransom; he is now serving the third term as Road Commissioner; his farm consists of 40 acres, where he now lives. His politics are Democratic; he has had a family of four children — Sarah, now Mrs. Hurlburt; Mary, now Mrs. Clingman; Addie, now Mrs. Briggs; Susan, now Mrs. Humphrey.

JOHN HARTZELL, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Orangeville; born in Northampton Co., Penn., May 27, 1801; was engaged in farming during his life in Pennsylvania; after his father's death he cared for the family, and came to Stephenson Co. April 10, 1855. On July 4, 1824, he married Miss Maria Andrews, who died on March 30, 1874, leaving a family of five — John, Henry, Mary E., now Mrs. Sechler; Sarah A., now Mrs. Shelter; Hannah S., now Mrs. Barnd. In 1856, Mr. Hartzell settled on Sec. 6, and owns 262 acres, valued at $50 an acre. He belongs to the Reform Church of Orangeville.

WILLIAM HERMAN, Cedarville; born in Adams Co., Penn.. March 23, 1800; moved to Lycoming Co., and stayed till 1828, when he moved to Tioga Co., and in 1846 came West to Stephenson Co., and located in Rock Run; then he moved to Florence Township in 1877; sold out and came to Cedarville, and settled on their present home. In 1828, he married Miss Stieffer; their family consisted of five children — John, Elizabeth, Wesley, William, Judson M.

JOHN HESER, blacksmith, Sec. 13; P. O. Buena Vista; born in Bavaria, Germany. April 11, 1819; he learned his trade in his native country, and in 1848 came to America; stopped in New Jersey; was some time on Long Island; the first place he lived in Stephenson Co. was Silver Creek Township; he settled here in 1857; built his shop in 1863, and his present dwelling in 1865. Mr. Heser has held school offices, and belongs to the Lutheran Church. Besides his house and shop, he owns 23 acres, valued at $50 an acre. His family consists of two children — John P. and Mary.

SOLOMON HIXSON, cooper, Cedarville; born in Union Co., Penn., Nov. 18, 1824; learned his trade at an early age, and worked with his father until his death, in 1845; he supported the family then, and in 1853 married Miss Margaret Snyder, and again in 1866 to Miss Mary Snyder; his family consisted of six children — Luther, Willie, Eddie, Maggie, Charles, Emma. Mr. Hixson's mother died in 1876, aged 83 years. He was engaged from 1855 to 1867 in making barrels for the Cedar Creek Mills; now farms some, and owns the property where he lives. He belongs to the Evangelical Church of Cedarville.

WILLIAM HOFF, merchant, Buena Vista; born in Union Co., Penn., April 19, 1833. In 1853, he married Miss Rachel Cline, of Pennsylvania, and in 1856 came West to Stephenson Co., going to Buena Vista in 1870; established a mercantile trade, which carried between $6,000 and $7,000 worth of stock. Mr. Hoff has now retired from business; he now owns a house and nine lots in the village, having sold his business March 18, 1880, to J. G. Ermold. William Hoff held the office of Postmaster from 1877 to May, 1880, and his family are John, William H., Charles M., Bertha A. and Lewis J. (deceased). Democrat in politics; Lutheran in religion.

MILTON B. HUMPHREY, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Buckeye Center; was born in Stephenson Co., and is now carrying on the old estate, which he has managed since 1877; it is situated on Sec. 20, consisting of 160 acres, valued at $50 an acre; he now has it stocked, and is giving his attention to pork. In December, 1875, he married Miss Hartzough, and had one child named Francis. Mr. Humphrey has held township and school offices, being Collector in 1875-76. His two brothers, John H. and Charles, enlisted in the 93d I. V. I; his brother Edward joined the Regulars, 12th Regiment; served his time out, and is now in Kansas.

THOMAS HUTCHINSON, farmer, Sec. 33; P. O. Cedarville; born in Union Co., Penn., Sept. 27, 1798; he was engaged in the woolen-factory with his brother, who died in January, 1880; manufactured in Union Co., then Lycoming Co., and then came West; he settled, first, near Cedarville, then bought this claim of John Rockey — then about 445 acres — of which he now holds 240, on Sec. 33; building a log cabin, went to farming, and at times worked at the factory; and one season he spent in Beloit, manufacturing woolen cloths. Mr. Hutchinson, in 1824, married Miss Wallace, and for fifty-four years they lived together without a cloud to darken their happiness; on June 11, 1878, she passed away; their family is M. Jane, now at home; Wallace, Stephenson Co. Treasurer; Margaret, deceased; Samuel, now on the adjoining farm; Sarah, now Mrs. Miller; Mary, now Mrs. Rutherford; Martha, living at home; Robert, at home; Isabella, in the office with her brother Wallace in Freeport; Samuel enlisted in the 146th I. V. I., and served one year on provost duty in the State of Illinois.

D. G. ILGEN, Cedarville; born in Clinton Co., Penn., in 1840; he spent his youth in Cedarville, where his father, in co-operation with others, succeeded in laying out the village, and as it stands, occupies George Ilgen's Addition; the pioneer family came to the West directed solely by map and compass, stopped first in Dakota, and then, in 1849, came here; the ground donated for public buildings was donated by Mr. Ilgen's family, the founder of the village; George Ilgen died in 1864, and, in 1870, the mother was followed to the grave by her twelve children. D. G. Ilgen finished his education in Springfield, Ill., and, in 1862, enlisted in the 93d I. V. I., Co. G, and was mustered out at Louisville, Ky., in June, 1865; during the service, he was in every rebel State, Texas and Florida; on arriving home, went to teaching school, and after nine terms at this, went into the employ of L. H. Everts & Co., publishers, and, in their interests, traveled through Ohio, Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and in 1877 came to Cedarville, became the successor of James Benson, now carrying on an extensive and growing trade in general merchandise; this mercantile enterprise was started and established by Mr. Benson in 1850, being now the oldest in the village, and Mr. Ilgen is now doing a good business in Cedarville and surrounding country. On Dec. 28, 1875, he married Miss Benson, of Cedarville; their son James was born on Oct. 9, 1877.

JOSEPH F. JACKSON, proprietor and operator of the Cedar Creek Woolen Factory, about two and a half miles northeast of Cedarville, on Sec. 32; the mill was built in 1856, and run as a flaxseed oil-mill, J. F. Jackson, Richard Glenan and John H. Addams, proprietors; in 1859, the woolen-factory was established by Joseph F. Jackson, and has been run by him since; in the different cloths manufactured, there are 18,000 pounds of wool used per annum; the building is 35x40 feet, three stories high, was formerly run by an over-shot waterwheel, but, in 1872, a Lefel turbine was placed in the mill of 20-in. diameter; near the mill stand the houses occupied by the families who gain a subsistence by working there. Mr. Jackson was born in Clinton Co., Penn., Jan. 1, 1821; learned the tanning trade, and worked at it a number of years; on coming West, he taught school, then went to farming. In 1847, married Miss Sarah Barber, and they have seven children — Sarah E., now Mrs. Dienur; Emily, John, Clara, Effie, William and Mary. Mr. Jackson has held the office of Supervisor, and also school offices; in politics, a Republican.

JACOB JONES, miller, Cedarville; born in Maryland, July 18, 1822; he was engaged with his father in farming and distilling till 1840, when they sold out and came West, and settled in Ogle Co., Ill., where his father died at the age of 93; his mother, now 78, still lives, hale and hearty. Mr. Jones engaged in milling on coming West, and has been employed in quite a number of mills in this and surrounding counties; is now resting, expecting to go to work soon. On Dec. 24, 1846, he married Miss Anna R. Mitten, of Maryland; their family is Margaret M., Mary, George, Alice, Ida, Clara, L,aura, Frank and Samuel. Mr. Jones is a Democrat; his wife belongs to the Lutheran Church.

ROBERT JONES, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Buckeye Center; born in Kent Co., England. Feb. 16, 1799; he left in the spring of 1831 for New York; lived in Utica for one year, aud about 1834, taking the Western fever, struck out for Illinois, where he met Levi Lucas, and came to Stephenson Co., in 1835, Dec. 24; when here,
took claims of some 500 acres each; together built a cabin, which was finished in 1836 or 1837; he lived here but one year; in 1845 put up part of his present house, and finished it in 1860; owns 154 acres of land, valued at $50. Mr. Jones married Miss Horlacher, Aug. 9, 1838, who died in 1859; in 1867, married again, a Miss Burgess; by the first marriage had seven children — Daniel W., twin brother to Thomas B.; David, Sarah, deceased; Elizabeth, now Mrs. Lied; Anna M., now Mrs. Fry; Robert H. Mr. Jones is a Republican, and now gives attention to cultivating grapes and bee keeping.

THOMAS B. JONES, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Buckeye Center; born Feb. 3, 1841, in Stephenson Co.; his father came to this county in 1835, Dec. 24; he owns 90 acres of land. Enlisted in 1861 in Co. B, 46th I. V. I.; served to the end of the war; he was promoted to Corporal,then 2d Lieutenant, and mustered out 1st Lieutenant; was wounded at the battle of Shiloh; was Township Collector during 1874 and 1875; is Justice of the Peace; is Trustee and Steward of the M. E. Church at Cedarville. Married Susan D. Snyder, in 1868; they have one child, Ralph D., born May 28, 1874; Republican in politics; attends M. E. Church.

DANIEL KECK, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Fountain Creek; born in Lehigh Co., Penn., in 1809, and his wife in 1816; he came out for health in 1851, to Stephenson Co.; while in Pennsylvania followed mercantile business; before coming West, had sent money to a friend, who bought 80 acres for him on Sec. 9, where he has since lived. In 1835, he married Miss Sager, and their family are Henry S., who belonged to Co. A, 46th I. V. I., Joseph S., Mary N., Amelia N. (now Mrs. Longenstein ), Ellen L. and Hiram F. Mr. Keck belongs to the Evangelical Church, and was a class leader thirty years.

DANIEL KOSTENBADER, farmer and carpenter, Cedarville; a native of Pennsylvania; came here in 1847; landed in Savannah, and started with his brother Aaron for David Neidigh's farm, where their brother Andrew was working; when they arrived at their destination, they had trouble to find work. In 1848, he and Aaron built a shop, and Aaron married and moved into it; one-half was used as a carpenter shop; in 1855, went back East, and with his sister, commenced keeping house; in 1857, he sold out that property and since 1860 has lived in this house; Daniel is single, and in 1861 enlisted in the 46th I. V. I., Co. K.; mustered out in 1862. The old family was Joseph, in Pennsylvania; Henry and Betsy also; Aaron is on the farm; Andrew is in Kansas; Louisanna, now a widow; Margaret, keeping house for Daniel; John, now deceased; Moses and Jake, in Pennsylvania; Samuel Soloman, over in Richland; Elias, in Iowa; Elias and Soloman were in the 92d I. V. I., and through the war; Daniel is a Republican.

WILLIAM H. KRYDER, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Cedarville; born in Pennsylvania Valley, Center Co., Penn., 1835; came West with a party of about seventeen persons; it took over three weeks to make the trip; on the way, his life was saved by Hannah Meese, who caught him as he was about to fall into the river; they came by boat to Savannah, and with four teams; from there up to where Neidigh lived, in an old cabin; they arrived in the county in 1842, May 18, soon built a cabin in Lancaster Township, where they lived until moving over to the factory, where he stayed from 1862 to 1864; he then moved to Cedarville, and enlisted Sept., 3, 1864, in the 146th I. V. I., Co. E, and escorted President Lincoln's body to the grave; he came back to Cedarville in July 25, 1865. In 1859, he married Miss Williams, and in 1869 moved on to the farm on Sec. 32; owns 171 acres, belonging at one time to the old Dr. Van Valzee claim. Mr. Kryder has a family of seven children — Mary J., now Mrs. Grayham; Ida B., deceased; George W., J. Frank, Hiram D., deceased; Eva M. and Cyrus.

EDWIN LIED, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Buckeye Centre; born in 1841 in Lancaster Co., Penn.; in 1854, came to Stephenson Co.; owns 160 acres or land. Enlisted in 1861 iu Co. E, llthl.V. I.; was mustered out June. 1865; was taken prisoner at Florence, Ga., in 1864; was released March 3, 1865. Has held township and school offices. Married Miss Jones Sept. 21, 1865; they have seven children — Harry R., Regina, John, Mary L., Lizzie E., Edwin M. and Robert R. He owns 80 acres of land. Republican in politics; Lutheran in religion.

WILLIAM LIED, merchant and Postmaster, Buckeye Center; born in Lancaster Co., Penn., Dec. 22, 1838; commenced keeping store with Jacob Folgate, but bought him out in 1878, and has sole possession of the business, which is increasing; he owns the store and a fine dwelling-house next, besides the land on which they are built. In 1858. Feb. 12, married Miss Melinda Folgate. Belongs to the Lutheran Church; Republican in politics.

WILLIAM McHOES, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Orangeville; born in Northampton Co., Penn, 1815; came to Stephenson Co. in 1849, with Charles Woodring's, Thomas and Jacob Bumis' and Mr. Applebauch's families; stayed on John Miller's farm that winter; in spring, moved to prairie north of Piles' Grove; then moved here on to his present home; he owns 160 acres, the southwest quarter of Sec. 1. In 1839, married Miss Woodring, who died in 1868. In 1871, he was married to Miss Lattig, of Pennsylvania; has had thirteen children, but there are only two at home — Eben and George; Oliver belonged to the 92d I. V. L, Co. G. Mr. McHoeshas been Township Commissioner and Justice of the Peace. Lutheran in religion.

WILLIAM K. MOCK, confectioner, Cedarville; born in York Co., Penn., Aug. 15, 1811; he moved to Lebanon Co. in 1818, and was engaged in mercantile business until coming West; in 1852, he went to Peru, La Salle Co., and then moved to Cedarville, where he kept the Cedarville House, but sold out and went into confectionery in 1854, and has been in it since; he owns a farm in Iowa, and also town property. In 1847, he married Miss Catherine Shull; they have one son, VanBuren, a carriage-painter. Mr. Mock is a Republican, and belongs to the Lutheran Church since 1827.

MICHAEL MUNHART, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Buena Vista; born in Germany, May 5, 1815; emigrated to America June 20, 1840; stopped in Lancaster Co. three years; in Richland Co. two years, and came to Stephenson Co. in September, 1845; owns 40 acres of land. In 1851, he married Miss Elizabeth Addam, of Pennsylvania, Union Co. He and his wife have belonged to the Lutheran Church since childhoad.

DANIEL MUSSER, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Orangeville; born Oct. 26 1836, in Centre Co., Penn.; came to Stephenson Co. in 1856, in company with his brothers; settled here, where his mother kept house for him till he was married in 1864 to Miss Rebecca Dreiblebis, of Pennsylvania; their children are William L., Mary E., Carrie M. and Burchard C. Mr. Musser owns 180 acres, and has been Supervisor of Buckeye since 1874; his brother, John, was elected Captain of Co. A, 46th I. V. I.; was wounded at Shiloh, and died in the hospital at Quincy; was buried in the cemetery at Orangeville.

MRS. MANLY PARRIOTT, widow, Sec. 13; P. O. Buena Vista; born in 1827, and married Manly Parriott in June, 1849; then moved to the old homestead in a log house, until 1860; when they built the one in which George now lives, she has two other children — Deborah, now Mrs. Clingman, and William, now tending the farm, which she owns, 250 acres. Her husband has been dead ten years, having died March 28, 1870, and his mother, Nov. 12, 1849. Both belonged to the M. E. Church of Orangeville. Mrs. Manly Parriott's maiden name was Betsey J. Carroll.

JACOB PIFER, carpenter and farmer, Cedarville; born in Lebanon, Lebanon Co., Penn., September, 1826; he learned his trade of William Layme when 18 years old, and May 3, 1862, came to Stephenson Co., and lived in Samuel Rosenberger's house in Cedarville; and in 1868, having bought this place, built a house on it, still working at his trade. In 1852, married Miss Rosenberger, and has a family of four boys — W. Latten, Cyrus A. and Samuel L., all carpenters now; Edward L., now working at painting. Mr. Pifer belongs to the German Reform Church at Cedarville, of which he is an Elder, now under Rev. F. Stump, of the Orangeville Circuit.

JOHN POLLOCK, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Orangeville; born in Scioto Co. Ohio; on April 8, 1844, he came to Stephenson Co., having lost his wife just before coming out; settled on Sec. 5, and bought 170 acres; used to be the old Fey claim; built part of the dwelling he now lives in, in 1848, and finished it in 1865. In 1847, he married Miss Morton, of New York, and has a family of eight children — Quincy, killed at Pittsburg Landing; Sarah J., now Mrs. Rockey; Anne E., David, Mary, John, Emma (deceased) and Jennie. Mr. Pollock has held school offices. Politics, Democrat. Mrs. Pollock belongs to the M. E. Church of Pleasant Hill.

THOMAS POLLOCK, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Orangeville; born in Scioto Co., Ohio, May 6, 1815; he first visited this county in 1840, afterward, together with his brother John, settled here in 1844; in 1845, their father came out, and they bought 320 acres for $450. Thomas married Miss Wilson in 1842; she died in 1859. In February, 1860, he married Miss Van Meter, and has a family of ten children — Calvin (deceased); Angemima, now Mrs. Messer; Samuel — and next family — Janette, James, Lewella, William, Quincy, George, Flora; Janette, is now Mrs. Fair. Mr. Pollock has been Commissioner of Highways, and held school offices. Politics, Democrat; religion, Presbyterian.

PETER C. REEDY, carpenter and farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Buena Vista; born in Berks Co.. Penn., in 1814; learned his trade when 17 years of age, in Berks Co., and moved to Lebanon Co.; from there to Ohio in 1839, then came to Stephenson Co. in 1844, in company with James Taylor and Andrew Streetmaker and family, Jacob Ploutz and family, Peter C. Reedy and John Emmes; after one year in Waddams, he bought his farm where he now lives, of 40 acres. Mr. Reedy is a bachelor, and at present has his brother and wife living on the homestead. Peter C. is a Democrat.

CHARLES REITZELL, farmer; P.O. Buena Vista; his father, Philip Reitzell, and family came to Stephenson Co. in September, 1840; George was here in March, John and Jonathan in June of the same year; his father died in 1850; his mother died in 1879; the old family were Franklin, Henry, Charles, Cyrus, Elizabeth, now the widow of E. B. Strohecker, and Mary; Franklin and Henry first managed the estate, and then Charles and Cyrus; they run the White Hall Mills from 1850 to 1874; Mrs. E. B. Strohecker was married to Dr. E. B. Strohecker in 1850; family — Eugene R., Mary E. and Jennie G.; Charles was born in Centre Co., Penn., in 1837, and is now holding a township office.

WILLIAM RITZMAN, farmer, Seel; P. O. Orangeville; born in Union Co., Penn., Dec. 25, 1804; followed milling and stilling till coming West. In 1829, he married Mary Gailwigs, who died in 1849. In 1851, June 10, he married Miss Mary Midderling, of Pennsylvania, and came to Stephenson Co. in November, 1846; settled on his homestead April 10, 1847, which he bought of Daniel Hawley, consisting of about 300 acres; there have been twenty-two children in the family, but only thirteen are now living — William, Henry, Jackson, John, George, Aaron, Charles, Robert (deceased), Martin, Lewis, Catherine, Uriah, Calvin and Quincy. Lutheran in religion.

EUSEBIUS SCHADLE, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Cedarville; born in Wurtemburg, Germany, Dec. 13, 1817; in his native country he learned weaving, and worked at it till coming to the United States, in the month of March, 1852; he stayed in New York awhile, and then came West in May of the same year to Stephenson Co., and settled in Silver Creek Township on a farm, but afterward moved to Buckeye, where he now owns 79 acres on Sec. 29. In 1854, he married Miss Haberly, of Germany; they have five children — Hannah, now Mrs. Frouz; Lizzie, living in Freeport; John, Mary and Willie. Mr. Schadle is a Democrat, and belongs to the Catholic Church.

WILLIAM STEWART, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Cedarville; born in Donegal Co., Ireland, March 17, 1833; came to Stephenson Co. in 1839, with about twenty-two persons in the party; came by water to Chicago, Ill., and from there by land, in wagons, to Freeport, where his father, Robert Stewart, took up his claim on Sec. 28, where William now lives, and owns 200 acres. In 1861, Nov. 7, he enlisted in the 46th I. V. I., Co. K; was promoted to First Lieutenant in 1862, Oct. 11, for meritorious service; promoted to captaincy, and in 1866, May 15, to Brevet Major. In 1866, May 27, he married Miss Gransdan, and has managed the farm ever since his father died, Jan. 21, 1872; they have seven children — Anna B., Amelia M., Robert J., Elsie S., Henry G., Sadie E. and Willie C.; the old family, thirteen; Robert now in California; Thomas, deceased; Lucinda, now Mrs. Whitmore; Margaret, now Mrs. Paul; Mary A., now Mrs. Heckle; William, subject of this sketch; Catherine, now Mrs. Johnson; Sarah, now Mrs. Nelson; Elizabeth, now Mrs. Wier; James C, Charles, Clara J., now Mrs Graham, and James C. deceased; their mother died April 14, 1878.

DR. S. C. THOMPSON, Cedarville; born in 1850; studied medicine when 19 years of age; read with Dr. Barrett, and went to Chicago and attended lectures at the Rush Medical College, graduating in the spring of 1872, and entered the competitive examination, and was assigned to St. Luke's Hospital, and took general practice for one year: he was then laid on his back by contracting the measles, and lost two good offers for Regular Army Physician; this was in the spring of 1873; in 1874, he came to Cedarville, and took Dr. S. R. Bucher's practice, the Doctor having died in 1874. He was one of the earliest pioneer settlers, and left a well established business, which Dr. Thompson most ably retains. He has quite a large laboratory connected with his office, and has accumulated sufficient to build a beautiful residence on the corner of Mill and Cedar streets. In 1879, he married Miss Ida M. Bucher.

GEORGE TROTTER, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Orangeville; born in Bourbon Co., Ky., June 13, 1809; in 1826, emigrated to Sangamon Co., Ill.; while a young man passed back and forth through Stephenson Co., mining, and during the Black Hawk war; serving in that campaign under Gen. Henry; in 1836, took this claim; now owns 135 acres. In March 24, 1833. married Miss Sarah Chilton, of Madison Co., Ill.; their children are Thomas, Elizabeth, now Mrs. Van Matre; James, William, George (deceased); Urania, now Mrs. Scott; Mary A. (deceased); Millard F., Sarah J. (deceased); Lucy C., now Mrs. Robey; John C. Mr. Trotter has held school offices, and his wife belongs to the United Brethren Church of Orangeville.

DANIEL WAGNER, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Buena Vista; born June 7, 1824 in Pennsylvania. Served a four year apprenticeship to be a cabinet-maker in Pennsylvania. Is an expert cabinet-maker. Came to Illinois from Pennsylvania by covered wagon. Owns 120 acres. Married Wilhemine Giese, born October 11, 1830; one son, John Wagner, born January 13, 1856.

JOHN WAGNER, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Buena Vista; born January 13, 1856. Works on family farm with father Daniel Wagner.

ANDREW WILSON, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Fountain Creek; born in 1823. Donegal Co., Ireland; he came to America in 1839, with his father, John Wilson; the rest of the family were John, Mary, Eli, Samuel, James and Moses; Andrew, in early times, worked for Dr. Van Valzee; mowed hay for Joseph Green, and was at McGee's mowing bee. He now lives on and owns 1 32 acres of the farm his father had originally claimed, which at one time embraced 640 acres. The house built on the old claim still stands. Andrew stayed on the old homestead until 1853, when he got this farm, ljing on Sees. 21 and 28. In 1867, he married Mrs. Woods, formerly Miss Pyle; they have had one child named Mary Jane. Mr. Wilson is a Democrat, and belongs to the Presbyterian Church of Cedarville.

JOHN WILSON, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Fountain Creek; born in 1827 in Donegal Co., Ireland; came to America with his father's family in 1839; John, among his early experiences, helped to build the bridge across the river at Freeport; and when they first got their claim there was but 10 acres broken. In 1858, he married Miss Devins, of Pennsylvania, and settled on his present home, Sec. 21, where he has a farm of 80 acres, valued at $50 an acre. Mr. Wilson is a Democrat, and has a fine family of five boys and five girls. John Wilson, his father, was quite an early settler in Stephenson Co., and is well and favorably known.

PHILIP WINDECKER, deceased; born 1826, in Germany; came to New York in 1849, where he worked as a cooper for eleven years, then coming West, arrived in Stephenson Co., in 1850, erected a cooper-shop, and besides making barrels for the surrounding country, firmed his land, using in those days, a yoke of oxen. Mr. Windecker died in 1876; he was married in 1843, and his widow now holds the farm of 87 acres; their family are John, Lucy, now Mrs. Swartz; William, Amelia, now Mrs. Augenstien; Ellen, now Mrs. Hofmeister; Sarah, now Mrs. Cochran; Hiram, Albert, Clara and Joseph. Mrs. Windecker belongs to the Evangelical Church; John and William belonged to the 46th I. V. I., Co. A; they reside on Sec. 9; P. O. Fountain Creek.

JERIT WOHLFORD, miller, Buena Vista; proprietor of the White Hall flouring-mills; he bought the mill property in 1876, January; the dimensions are 50x60 feet, 3 stories high, and runs three pairs of stones, with the finest water-power in the county, using the Leffli turbine wheel, one 30 in., the other 36 in.; Jared's father settled on Sec. 12, in this county in 1842; he has three brothers, John, Thomas and Webster; he now own the mill and 360 acres of land. In 1867, married Miss Melinda Shank, of Wisconsin, and has six children — Ida, Emma, Johns Eddie, Mary and Meliuda, twins. Mr. Wohlford has held office, and is a Republican.

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Remarkable Stories, Volume 1
by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a Licensed Massage Therapist and Life Coach. An amateur historian, parts of these stories and many more appear on his website, www.robertbike.com.

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LANCASTER TOWNSHIP

THOMAS BELL, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Cedarville; born in Dauphin Co., Penn., Dec. 2. 1819; came to Stephenson Co., in June, 1843; the trip from Pennsylvania here he made on horseback, in company with his brother Robert, now proprietor of the Tremont House in Freeport; being a carpenter by trade, he carried on that business for many years in connection with farming, to which latter occupations he has gradually giving more and more of his attention; his farm comprises 400 acres of fine land in Lancaster, Harlem and Buckeye Townships. As an apt reminder of early days, there is yet standing near his residence the first parsonage built in Stephenson Co. Mr. B. is an honored member of the M. E. Church, and of the Republican party; has held township offices. In 1845, he married Miss Jane W. Young, who came here in 1839, with her parents, Robert and Sarah Young, from Union Co., Penn; the first brick house built in Stephenson Co. was erected by her father; it being the house now occupied by James Adams, one and a half miles west of Cedarville. in Buckeye Township; her father died in February, 1857, aged 64; her mother yet lives at the advanced age of 79. Mr. and Mrs. Bell, have four children living — James E., William R., Anna M. (Mrs. Clinghman) and Samuel Y.; one daughter, Sarah E. (Mrs. Badger, deceased).

RUDOLPH K. BRUBAKER, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Freeport; born in Lancaster Co., Penn., Sept. 25, 1817; lived in Pennsylvania until 1853, when he removed to Stephenson Co., Ill., built his present large, convenient and comfortable dwelling in 1854, and from that pleasant home, has since daily gone forth to industrious laborers; his farm embraces 140 acres, well cultivated, and his location gives him all the advantages of good society, fine markets, etc. Religious faith, Mennonite. He was married in 1840, in Pennsylvania, to Miss Elizabeth Siegrist, also a native of Lancaster Co., in that State; they have nine children — Abram, John, Andrew, Maria (Mrs. Ebersole), Benjamin, Jacob, Elizabeth (Mrs. Shoemaker), Daniel and Rudolph.

E. B. CLINGMAN, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Cedarville; born in Stephenson Co., July 22, 1852; his father, Josiah Clingman, a well-known citizen of the county, settled here in 1836, and was intimately associated with the affairs of the county until his death, which occurred in 1865. Mr. C. has been all his life a resident of the county, except the years from 1873 to 1878, during which time he lived in Black Hawk Co., Iowa; has been chiefly engaged in farming, though employed as a teacher in his district for the winter of 1879 and 1880; his landed possessions comprise 168 acres, in Dakota and Buckeye Townships. Politics, Republican. He was married, in 1871, to Miss Anna M. Bell, daughter of Thomas Bell, whose biography also appears in this work. Their children are Harry A., Minnie, Wad and Thomas J.

CONRAD DAMBMAN, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. Freeport; born in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, in 1828; immigrated to America in March, 1849; lived in New York until 1854. when he came to Stephenson Co., Ill.; for eleven years lived on the farm near where Tobias Engle now lives; for the last fifteen years has resided in his present location. Starting in America without a dollar, he has, by the irresistible combination of hard work and economy, made for himself and family a handsome property, and a home noted for its many conveniences; his farm consists of 252 acres, in Sees. 16 and 17; near his house is one of the finest springs of living water to be found in the State; connected with this bounteous water-supply, is a splendid two- story brick spring-house, with special adaptations to dairy purposes; and his large barn, granary, carriage-house, and comfortable dwelling, all show the care taken to have his surroundings in good condition. His political party is the Democratic. Mr. D. was married, in 1855, to Miss Elizabeth Dreitzell. who was born in Germany, in 1833. They have five children living — Henry, Conrad, Katie (Mrs. John Schetzel, of Dakota Terr.). Enlie and Lizzie; three deceased — Mary, Augusta and Emma

SAMUEL DAUGHENBAUGH, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Freeport; born about twenty miles from Philadelphia, in Chester Co., Penn., in the year 1807; was raised, principally, in the portion of Centre Co. that was, a' a later date, called Clinton Co.; removed to Stephenson Co., Ill., in May, 1848; his farm here comprises 94 acres, in a good state of cultivation; for the last few years, unable to perform the active labors of the farm, he has entrusted the farm-work chiefly to his willing boys, who, with younger energies, carry on the industry. Mr. D. has held township and school offices. His political preferences are Democratic. In 1830, he married Miss Susan Wilt, who was born in Dauphin Co., Penn., in 1809; their children are William J., Mary J, deceased; Amanda C., now Mrs. Prosper Lloyd; John S., Rebecca E., now Mrs. Joseph Diemer; Darius F., Sarah F., now Mrs. William Sirong; Samuel A., Benjamin F. and Henry A.

DAVID L. EBERSOLE, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Freeport; born in Lancaster Co., Penn., in 1844; in 1868, removed to Whiteside Co., Ill., and from there, after a two years' residence, came to Stephenson Co., in the fall of 1870; has a farm of 80 acres, under good cultivation, with good farm buildings, etc. Religion, Mennonite; politics, Republican; has held school offices. He was married, in December, 1870. to Miss Maria Brubaker, daughter of Rudolph K. Brubaker, a well-known and worthy citizen of the same neighborhood. Mr. and Mrs. Ebersole have two children — Ella May and Annie Laura.

TOBIAS ENGLE, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Freeport; born in Lancaster Co., Penn.. March 9, 1829; removed to Stephenson Co., III., in the spring of 1851; for his first eight years in the county was engaged in the hardware business in Freeport — most of the time in partnership with Henry Strohm; while in business there, he and his partner built some their business houses on Exchange Block, and in this and other ways aided materially in the building-up of the city. Since 1860, he has been chiefly engaged in farming and stock-raising; his farm consists of 280 acres, in Secs. 21, 22 and 28; and he has, besides this, some property in Freeport. He is a member of the Embury M. E. Church; is identified with the Republican party; has held school offices; been County Commissioner, etc. In 1853, he married Miss Mary A. Myers, a native of York Co., Penn.; they have eleven children — Albert H., Jacob M., Tobias S., Charles A., Rosa, Mary, Ida, Emma, Lillie, Cora and Nettie.

D. G. FAGER, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Cedarville; born in Northumberland Co., Penn., March 23, 1839; removed with his parents to Stephenson Co.. Ill., in May, 1844; has been engaged in; farming, except six years, in which he was employed as a carpenter; he has 95 acres of land in Sec. 7, Buckeye Township, and 8 acres in Waddams Township. Is a member of the Evangelical Association, and of the Republican party; has held school and township offices. He was married in 1858, to Miss Sarah Wagner, a native of Pennsylvania; their children are Jestie, Anna, John, William, Ezra N., Joel U., Bertha May and Mary Ada.

LEVI FAHS, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Cedarville; born in York Co., Penn., in 1831; in 1852, emigrated to Ohio, where he remained three years, removing to Stephenson Co. in 1855; has a good farm, embracing 216 acres in Lancaster and Waddams Townships. Is a member of the Evangelical Church, and identified with the Republican party; is president of School Board in his district. In 1861, he married Miss Ellen E. Hear, a native of Pennsylvania; she died Feb 27, 1878; in the fall of 1879, he was married to Polly Jones, also a native of Pennsylvania; his children, living, are Elizabeth, Estella, Orlando, May and Emma; those deceased are Minerva, John, Levi, and Wesley.

WILLIAM GLASSER, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Freeport; born in New York, Feb. 11, 1834; at the age of 18, left New York and came to Chicago; stopped near that city for half a year, then went to the Lake Superior region for two years; returned then to his native place, and six months later came to Stephenson Co, in 1855, and has since that date made his home in this county; he worked at the carpenter trade until some time after settling here; of later years has been exclusively engaged in farming; has a good farm of 160 acres, well improved, good buildings, etc. Is a member of the Reformed Church, and a highly esteemed citizen of his community. In 1855, he was married to Miss Lavina Mitchell, daughter of M. P. Mitchell, a well- known citizen of this county; their children are Hannah M., Mary R., Irvin M., John F. and Eurie L; three deceased — Elmira, Willie and Ascenath.

L. F. HENDERSON, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Freeport; born in New York, Sept. 22, 1829; resided in that State until 1850, when he removed to Stephenson Co., Ill., reaching this county on the 23d of May, in that year. On the 6th of January, 1853, he married Mrs. Emmaretta S. Crocker; she died Sept. 7, 1872; in 1874, he was married to Miss Annie A. Kramer; they have two pleasant, bright-eyed children — Emmaretta M. and Freddie; Mr. Henderson's comfortable home, not far from the city limits, is one of the pleasantest locations in the vicinity of Freeport; his farm comprises 154 acres, and is well cared for by its genial proprietor, whose business enterprise in years gone by, in starting various manufacturing establishments in Freeport, has resulted in much benefit to the city, if not to himself. His religious connection is with the Presbyterian Church; his political affiliation is with the Republican party.

W. W. HUTCHISON, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Freeport; is a native of Union Co., Penn., and was born Oct. 15, 1829; came to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1843; has a finely located and well-improved farm of 80 acres in the north, part of Lancaster Township. Is a member of the United Presbyterian Church, and identified with the Republican party; he has the confidence of his fellow-citizens to the fullest extent: has held school and township offices; is the present Treasurer of Stephenson Co., and warmly alive to the best interests of the people among whom he lives. He was married in 1853, to Miss Isabella Young; she died April 9, 1854; in 1867, he married Mary C. Hayes; have four children — Mary B., Florence L., Annie L. and Edith J.

RUDOLPH KENCKE, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Freeport; born in Washington Co., Wis., Oct. 10, 1844; came to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1859; has a farm of 83 acres, in good condition, with comfortable residence, etc. During the civil war Mr. Kencke gave four and a half years of faithful service to preserve the Union, being a member of Co. Gr, 46th Regt. I. V. I., participating with his command in the battles of Ft. Donelson, Ft. Henry, Pittsburg Landing, siege of Corinth, Holly Springs. Hatchie River, siege of Vicksburg, Ft. Blakeley, etc., being discharged at the close of the war as Orderly Sergeant of his company. In politics he is a Republican; has been School Director of his district. He was married in 1867 to Miss Martha E. Smith, a native of Stephenson Co.; they have four children — Edgar, Flora, Henry and Arthur. Mrs Kencke is a daughter of Samuel Smith (deceased); one of the oldest and best known of the early settlers in Stephenson Co.; he came to this county from Rockbridge Co., Va., in the fall of 1836, and was during all the subsequent years intimately connected with the best material interests of his community; he owned some 400 acres of land at the time of his death, and had probably broken up more of the wild land here than any other man in the county. His habits of industry were kept up to the day of his death, which was caused by a railroad accident on the 19th of November, 1878.

A. LAMBERT, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Cedarville; was born in Somerset Co., Penn., in December, 1851; resided in that State until June, 1874, when he removed to Stephenson Co.; has been constantly engaged in farming, and is regarded by his neighbors as a worthy, intelligent, and enterprising citizen. Politics, Republican. In August, 1877, he was married to Miss Mary A. Bear; they have one child living— Forrest Earle; one child died in infancy.

GEORGE W. LATTIG, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Freeport; born in Northampton Co., Penn., Aug. 22, 1795; lived in his native State until 1851, when he removed to Stephenson Co., Ill.; for many years he pursued his occupation of weaver; finally, gave his attention exclusively to farming; by a long life of upright conduct, he has gained the respect of those associated with him, and is universally esteemed by all who know him; has a farm of 65 acres; he has held school and township offices. In politics, is a Republican. For sixty-six years has been a member of the German Reformed Church. In 1819 he married Miss Anna Jacoby, who was born near Philadelphia; she died in 1871; the children living are Peter, Anna, Elizabeth, Hannah, Sarah, Maria, Emma, Matildah, Rosanna. Susannah, George, John and Eleanora; those deceased are Lovina, George, William and Vina.

OBED H. LINTNER, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Freeport. The subject of this sketch, who is a son of Rev. Christian H. Lintner, an honored minister of the Evangelical Association, was born in Lake Co., Ill., in July, 1846; came to Stephenson Co., in September, 1866; has a farm of 80 acres, finely situated and in good cultivation. His church membership is with the Evangelical Association. His politics, Republican. He was married in 1868 to Miss Sarah E. Brown, of Stephenson Co; their children are Fearon, William, Warren O., Oliver C, Edna C, John J. and Salinas M.

J. F. McKIBBEN, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Freeport; born in Pennsylvania in 1824; resided there — where his father had been one of the early settlers in that part of Pennsylvania— until June, 1845, when he emigrated to Stephenson Co.; has a nicely located, well-watered, and finely-improved farm of 200 acres. Is one of the leading men of his town-hip; having been Town Clerk for fourteen years; a School Director for twenty-two years, and is ever ready to work far the good of his community. Is a member of the Second Presbyterian Church in Freeport, which church he helped to organize. In politics, he is a Republican. He was married, in 1845, to Miss Mary J. McKibben, also a native of Pennsylvania; their children are Ann, Elizabeth, now Mrs. J. T. Lease, of Ridott Township; Clarissa, Amanda, Susan, now Mrs. R, Gardner, of Harlem Township; James, Perry, Mary, now Mrs. W. H. Brubaker, of Lancaster Township; Frank, Nellre and Mary J. (deceased).

R. K. MADDEN, teacher, Sec. 10; P. O. Freeport; born in Pennsylvania Sept. 27, 1834; resided in Pennsylvania until 1857, when he removed to Wooster, Wayne Co., Ohio; remained there five years, removing to Perry Co., in Southern Illinois, in the fall of 1862; in 1862, went to Washington Co, Ill., where he lived until 1875, when he came to Stephenson Co., where he has resided since that date; the profession of teaching is the one in which Mr. M. has been chiefly engaged; he was admitted to the bar in Ohio and re-admitted in this State, but pursues teaching, because to him it is more congenial than the practice of law. He was married in Ohio, in 1861, to Miss Hattie Somers; she died in 1879; three children— Klem, Otto and Edgar.

I. N. MALLORY, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Freeport; born in Belmont Co., Ohio, Nov. 27, 1829; when a year old, removed with his parents, D. W. C. and Ellen Mallory, to Vermillion Co., Ill.; where they resided until the removal to Stephenson Co. in the fall of 1836, and this has been the place of residence since that date; Mr. M. has a good farm of 137 acres in Sees. 24 and 25, with good dwelling and other buildings, etc. His devotion to the Union was shown during the civil war by his enlisting as a soldier in Co. B, 4th I. V. I., a gallant regiment, which did faithful work in many battles of the war; he was mustered out at Mound City, Ill., for disability caused by exposure in the line of duty as a soldier. He is a member of the Christian Church, and, in politics, a Republican of unquestioned devotion to the best interests of the country; has held school and township offices. In 1855, he married Miss Miranda V. Webb, who was also born in Ohio, but removed to Illinois in early life; their children are Harriet E., De Witt M., Jasper J., Mary E., Albert N., Almira W., James H.. Jane M., William E., Sarah Belle and Martha A.

REUBEN MEYERS, farmer, Sec. 23; P.O. Freeport; born in Northampton Co., Penn., Jan. 16, 1829; removed to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1852; his first three years in this county he worked in a mill, and after this, until the war commenced, was employed in a woolen factory. During the civil war, he was three years in the service as a soldier in Co. G, 93d I. V. I., being with his command in all its numerous engagements 'in the West and Southwest, among which may be mentioned the battles of Missionary Ridge, Altoona Pass, siege of Vicksburg, etc., etc. Since the war, he has been engaged in farming; has held school offices; in religion a Presbyterian, and in politics a Republican. He was married in 1852 to Miss Sirah M. Lattig, daughter of George W. Lattig; their children are George William, died March 8, 1880; Stephen S. J., Anna E., Eugene L., Susie L. and Frederic C.

JACOB P. MITCHELL, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Freeport; born in Centre Co., Penn., Sept. 18, 1818; the part of Centre Co. in which he lived was afterward named Clinton Co.; removed to Stephenson Co., Ill., in the spring of 1842; being a carpenter and joiner by trade, he worked at that business until about 1875, much of the time also employing other workmen, and has erected many of the buildings in Stephenson Co.; since 1875, he has been farming, which vocation he had also carried on previously in connection with his other work; has 205 acres of fine land in Lancaster Township, besides 15 acres of timber land in Ridott Township. Mr. Mitchell has an accurate knowledge of much of the settlement of the county, and extensive information derived from personal observation of other localities, having traveled many thousands of miles at different times through Iowa, Missouri, Kansas and Nebraska, at early and exciting periods in their history. In politics, he is a Republican. In 1842, just previous to his removal here, he married Miss Eleanor M. Pollock, of Clinton Co., Penn., she was a native of Union Co., Penn.; they have seven children living — Norton L., Robert T., Austin H., Mary J., Martha A., James W. and Sarah E.; three deceased — William B., Maggie Isabella and Emily M.

WILLIAM B. MITCHELL, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Freeport; born in Clinton Co., Penn., Dec. 16, 1815; came to Stephenson Co., Ill., about the 1st of September, 1810; being a carpenter by trade, he pursued that vocation in Pennsylvania and for a good many years after coming here; of late years, has devoted his attention to farming; has 656 acres of land in this county, an exceedingly comfortable, homelike residence, and, having started in life a poor man, he is indebted to his own exertions for his present ownership of a very considerable property. He has held various public offices — Supervisor, Assessor, Justice of the Peace etc., etc., at different times, almost ever since the organization of his township. Politics, Republican. In 1842, he was married to Miss Lydia Furst, a native of Pennsylvania; their children are Laird A., Duncan N., Ann R., Ellen S., Jerusha Jane (Mrs. Jacob L. Thomas), William F., Laura C. and John A.

JOSEPH MYERS, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Freeport; born in Crawford Co., Ohio, Nov. 22, 1843; when quite young removed with his parents to De Kalb Co., Ill.; they being among the first settlers in that locality. In 1868, he came to Stephenson Co., where he has since, for most of the time, being engaged in farming; his farm comprising 40 acres of land, under tine cultivation. During the great rebellion, he was for two years a member of Company A, 17th Regiment, Illinois Cavalry, doing faithful service with his command, and being honorably discharged with his company and regimental the close of the war. He is a member of the Evangelical Association; in politics, affiliates with the Republican party. In Sept. 1867, he married Miss Sarah E. Lintner, daughter of Rev. C. H. Lintner; they have five children, William E., Obed H., John J., Lillian C. and Lurie C.

WILLIAM PETERS, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Freeport; born in Centre Co., Penn., Oct. 2, 1816; lived there until 1844; when he removed to Wayne Co., Ohio; from thence in the fall of 1845, he moved to La Grange Co., Ind.; remaining there eight years; coming to Stephenson Co., Ill., in June, 1853; his farm consists of 60 acres, in a beautiful situation, and on which he carries on, very nicely, the kindred pursuits of farming and fruit growing. Mr. Peters is, by profession, a surveyor, and in various States and localities, has pursued his profession since 1840; was for eight years the County Surveyor of Stephenson Co., enjoying in large measure the confidence of his fellow-citizens. He has been entrusted with various local offices; has been Notary Public, in his town, for the last sixteen years; has also been Justice of the Peace, and held various school and township offices. Is a member of the Second Presbyterian Church in Freeport, and is much esteemed by all who know him. He was married, first, to Miss Isabella H. Swansey, of Pennsylvania, on the 8th day of June, 1844; She died, Aug. 29, 1871; his second marriage took place on the 9th of Feb. 1873, to Mrs. Susan Garman, also a native of Pennsylvania; three children living — Henry E. of Fort Scott, Kansas; Lillie A., Mrs. M. J. Becker; also of Fort Scott; and Egarie; one daughter — Laura Frances, died July 6, 1870.

WILLIAM W. PHILLIPS, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Freeport; born in Albany Co., N. Y., in 1818; lived there until April, 1846, when he came to Stephenson Co., Ill., being one of the first pioneers here from his part of New York; has a neat farm of 80 acres, which he has brought to its present comfortable condition, by patient industry and care. Religion, Methodist; politics, Republican. He was married in January, 1845, to Miss Hannah Townsend, from the same neighborhood, in New York, from whence he came; she died in 1864. In June, 1874, he was married to Mrs. Sarah Schermerhorn (maiden name, Stafford); three children living — Wesley R. in Kansas; George O., and Vernie R.; three deceased — Sarah Melissa, Joseph Avilla, and Amla.

JACOB W. RUTTER, blacksmith and carpenter, Cedarville; born in Dauphin Co., Penn., Nov. 15, 1817; he learned his trade in Berks Co., Penn., with his father, in 1835; went to Ohio at journey work in 1840. October he married Miss Hartman; worked in a shop of his own in 1845, Schoolkill Co.; he was here over seven years, and afterward in Dauphin, and Fisherville; he came West in 1854, April 15, and located in Cedarville; first lived in his shop, then built his present home, in 1855, Dec. 17; in 1860, put his blacksmith shop up. In 1861, Nov. 16, enlisted; however, his health failing, returned after nine months' service. Went into his shop, and has followed the business since. Has had a family of eleven children — William H., Sarah A., Benjamin F, Anna C, John J. A., Mary E., one deceased, no name; Susan R. H., Winfield S. H., David W. J., Isaac T. F. R.

R. F. REZNER, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Freeport; born in Union Co., Penn., Aug. 25, 1825; he was raised a farmer, but, at the age of 25, engaged in mercantile business, in partnership with his brother-in-law, in Columbia Co., Penn.; after five years of mercantile life, he sold his interest in the store to his partner, and came Wett, to Stephenson Co., in 1856, and has since been engaged in farming; has 80 acres of good land, with large and convenient buildings, and all the surroundings of a comfortable and cultivated home. Has been School Director nearly all the time since his residence here; for the last six years Supervisor for his township, and universally spoken of as “one of the best men in the county;” politics, Republican. His religious preferences are with the Presbyterian Church, of which his wife is a member — Second Presbyterian Church, of Freeport. He was married in December, 1848, to Miss Elizabeth Sheller; she was born in Lebanon Co., Penn.; removed to Huntingdon Co. when quite young, and to Union Co., in the same State, a few years before marriage; they have four children living — James, Laura, John and Scott; three children deceased — Scott, Maggie, and one who died in infancy.

JOSEPH SIEFERMAN, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Freeport; born in Baden, Germany, Oct. 3, 1827; emigrated to America in 1858, and settled in the same year in Stephenson Co.; coming here with the honest desire to find a place where he could secure fair pay for industrious toil, he has done much hard work and is rewarded by the possession of a comfortable home and a carefully tilled farm, comprising 80 acres. His religion is Catholic; his politics, to vote for “the best men.” He was married in February, 1865, to Miss Teresa Bene, also a native of Baden; they have three children living — Mary, William and Caroline; one child died in infancy.

LORENZ SIEFERMAN, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Freeport; born in Baden, Germany, in 1837; came to America, and settled in Stephenson Co., in 1864. He soon afterward enlisted in Co. C, 46th I. V. I., and for the remainder of the civil war did faithful service as a soldier for his adopted country, being engaged in the battles of Black River Bridge, Mobile, Spanish Fort, and the other engagements of the final year's warfare; since the war he has been industriously engaged in farming; lias a good farm of 80 acres. He is a member of the Catholic Church. In November, 1872, he married Miss Wilhelmina Hunt, also a native of Baden; they have three children — Wilhelmina, Anna and Helena.

WILLIAM W. SMITH, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Freeport; born in Canton, Ohio, July 20, 1826; removed with his parents to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1835, landing in the county on the 31st of October of that year; his father, Julius Smith, deserves special mention, as an early settler; being a carpenter and builder, he did about the first work of that kind that was done in Freeport; as examples of his work may be mentioned his building the first court house, and the first bridge across the Pecatonica River; he was one of the first Commissioners after the organization of the county; for many years a Justice of the Peace; one of the charter members of the first Masonic lodge in Freeport, and in various other ways intimately associated with the early settlement of the county; the confidence reposed in him during the earlier days was continued by his numerous old-time friends and younger acquaintances down to the day of his death, which occurred Feb. 15, 1879; his wife, Eleanor Smith, had died July 15, 1850. The first business in which the subject of this sketch engaged for himself, was the manufacture of shingles, which he carried on extensively in Freeport, from 1843 until after the railroad from Chicago reached this point; he was subsequently engaged in dealing in lumber, wood, etc., in connection with farming, and has, of late years, devoted his entire attention to agricultural pursuits; he resided in Freeport until the fall of 1876, when he removed to his present residence; his farm comprises 160 acres of well-improved land, with a neat farm-house, commanding a fine view of the city near it. He has held several important offices; was first Marshal of Freeport under the city organization, filling that office during the years 1855, 1856 and 1857, and filled various other city offices, and had been one of the Town Trustees previous to city organization; during most of the years of the civil war he was engaged in the secret service. He is identified with the Republican party, and well known throughout the county as one of its most honorable, upright citizens. Mr. S. was married on the 6th of March, 1843, to Miss Margaret Lawn, a native of New York; they have three children living — Charles W., married, and living in Lancaster Township; William O., married and living near Ackley, Iowa, and Minnie; four children deceased — Ellen, Josephine, Elizabeth and Martha (Mrs. Charles Haggart); the last-named daughter died in Freeport in 1875; her husband died April, 1879; their two orphan children — Ellen M. and Carrie, live with their grandparents, William W. and Margaret Smith, subjects of this sketch.

BENJAMIN SNYDER, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Freeport; born in Pennsylvania, April 5, 1807; removed to Stephenson Co., Ill., in June, 1840; is widely known throughout the county as a thorough-going business man, and public-spirited citizen; has 500 acres of land in Lancaster and Harlem Townships, and some landed property elsewhere; and in addition to his management of this large acreage, has been and is engaged in other business, such as lumber and wood dealer in Freeport, besides bung agent for the Lancaster Fire and Lightning Insurance Company, etc. Is a member of the Embury M. E. Church. In politics acts with the Republican party. Has held school, township and county offices. His first marriage was in May, 1842, to Miss Mary Stynes, of Pennsylvania, formerly of New Jersey; her death occurred May 3, 1856. His second marriage was to Miss Julia A. Sidels, a native of Pennsylvania, on the 25th of September, 1856. The children living are Adrain L., Mary E., Mrs. Richard, of Nebraska; William H., George F., Laura A., Charley L. and Carrie May. Those deceased are Rebecca, John, Sarah, Amaretta and Catherine.

WARREN STEBBINS, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Freeport. The subject of this sketch was born in Stephenson Co., Feb. 27, 1855; has been a continuous resident of this county; in partnership with his brother has 219 acres of land, and is an energetic and enterprising farmer. Politics, Republican. He was married, in 1876, to Miss Ellen Screiber, a native of Ogle Co., Ill; their children are Lillian, Frances and Emma Jane.

C. YARGER, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Freeport; was born in Centre Co., Penn., about 1820; came to Stephenson Co. in October, 1865; has a fine farm of 187 acres. Has held school and township offices; is a member of the Second Presbyterian Church, in Freeport; his political preferences are with the Democratic party, but his influences are exerted to keep in office the best men, irrespective of party affiliations. In 1843, he married Miss Sarah J. McManigal, a native of Centre Co., Pa. Their children are Mary C, Harriet J. James L., Franklin R., Thomas M., William C, Sarah E., Juliet L., Hiram M. and Laura J.

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Remarkable Stories, Volume 1
by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a Licensed Massage Therapist and Life Coach. An amateur historian, parts of these stories and many more appear on his website, www.robertbike.com.

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ROCK RUN TOWNSHIP

A. O. ANDERSON, farmer, Sec. 22 and 23; P. O. Davis; born in Norway, July 16, 1835, and came to America in 1839, with his parents; the first land he bought was 40 acres, on which he made the improvements, and now owns 170 acres. Has been Path Master; in politics, Republican; in religion, Lutheran. His wife, Ingabor Knudson, was born in Norway, in 1834; came to America in 1860; they were married in 1862, and they have had eight children — Annie Mary, Julia, Olie A., Carrie, Charlie, Ingabor, Isabella and Jane, deceased. Has run a threshing machine for sixteen years; has a fine stone barn, 64x36.

SYVERT O. ANDERSON, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Davis; born in Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1841; living on the old homestead; has 90 acres of land; his father and mother were born in Norway; they are about 80 years of age. Syvert's wife was Helga Gunderaon; born in Norway, in 1859; they were married June 24, 1879. Halvor O. Anderson, a brother, enlisted in the 72d I. V. I., July, 1862, and contracted a disease from which he died; he was at the battle of Stone River.

JOSEPH AFFLERBAUGH, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Davis; born in Berks Co., Penn., Dec. 10, 1809; came to Illinois Nov. 12, 1849; entered 40 acres of land and improved it; he now owns 600; a blacksmith by trade, has shop near the house. In politics, Democrat; in religion, Evangelical; has been School Director twelve years, and Path Master. His wife, Elizabeth Wise, was born in 1815, at Northampton Co., Penn.; married in 1835; have had twelve children — Nathaniel, in Nebraska; James, in Davis; Mary, now Mrs. Holgate, in Missouri; Sophia, now Mrs. Fink; Joseph, in Kansas; Catharine, now Mrs. Grrove, in Shelby Co., Ill.; Susan, now Mrs. Straw, in Shanon; Thomas, in Nebraska; Harrison, at home; Annij, now Mrs. Snyder; Charlie, deceased; infant, deceased.

D. BELLMAN, retired farmer; P. O. Davis; born in Lewisburg, Union Co., Penn., March 18, 1809; came to Stephenson Co. in June, 1852, and bought 120 acres, on which he made most of the improvements. Has been Supervisor for Rock Run Township for thirteen years, and has held other of the town offices. Member of Lutheran Church; has been Trustee and Elder for several years; in politics, Republican. His wife, Rachael Roush, was born in Union Co., Penn., at Mifflinsburg, in 1817; married in February, 1832; have had eleven children, seven living.

A. BEST, dealer in furniture and cabinet-maker, Davis; born in Pennsylvania, Jan 30, 1853; came to Illinois with his parents and settled in Winnebago Co. on a farm of 120 acres; engaged in business in 1877. In politics, Republican; in religion, Evangelical. His wife, Emma Fisher, was born in Pennsylvania in 1856, and married in 1877; have had three children — Lydia, May, and infant (twin), died Oct. 17, 1879.

JOSEPH BINKER, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Davis; born in Northampton Co., Penn., in 1843, and came to Illinois in the year 1872; bought 80 acres of land and made the improvements; has a good bank barn 60x34, also good house. Enlisted in the 153d Penn. V. I. in 1862, and mustered out in 1865. Tn politics, Republican; in religion, Lutheran; has been School Director. His wife, Malinda Kem, was born in Northampton Co., Penn., in 1846; they were married in 1866, and have had seven children — Ellen, died in 1869; Edna, Frank, Jennie, Edgar, Flora and Willie.

J. L. BLACKMORE, dealer in drugs, paints and oils; born in Stephenson Co., Rock Grove Township, in 1843; worked on the farm until he went West, teaching school in Van Buren Co., Iowa, about one year; then to Kansas, and teaching about one year there; then returned to Davis, and engaged in druijs. In politics, Democrat; in religion, Liberal. His wife, Mary Haid, was born in Kansas in 1855; married in 1873.

MICHAEL BLIMM, farmer, Sec. 33; P. O. Dakota; born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1821; came to America in 1836 to Erie Co., N. Y., and to Stephenson Co. in 1854; bought 5 acres, and his wife bought 40 acres, and they now own 120 acres, on which they have made good improvements; has paid some attention to the raising of bees. In politics, Democrat; in religion, Catholic. His wife, Mary Vingert was born in Fridevig, Germany; they were married in New York; have had thirteen children — John, at home; Mary, now Mrs. Eshed, in Missouri; Michael, at home, Anthony, at home; Eva, now Mrs. Rarn, in Stephenson Co.; Joseph, at home; Mary Barbara, at home; four deceased.

D. BOLLMAN, restaurant and wholesale liquor, stock and grain buyer, Davis; also keeps a fine stable of horses; a fine stallion, sired by Iron Sides and Messenger, and a jack. Born in Pennsylvania in 1829; came to Illinois in 1854; owns town property, and a large barn 30x40 feet. In politics, Democrat; in religion, Liberal. His father was born in Pennsylvania in 1801; his mother, 1803; and they now reside with him, as also does his sister.

URIAH BOYDEN, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Rock City; born in New York in 1808; came to Stephenson Co., Sept. 27, 1839; bought a claim of 160 acres, and now owns 152, on which he has made improvements; has two good springs of water on the place. Enlisted Aug. 14, 1862; discharged Dec. 21, 1862. In 1852 went across the Plains; remained about one year. In politics, Republican; in religion, Liberal. His wife, Elmira Snyder, was born in New York, 1811; married in New York, 1839; has had five children — Caroline, now Mrs. March; Ann Jane, died 1854; Eva Eliza, now Mrs. Bonebright; Lucinda, now Mrs. Keagle; Jane, died when young.

MARTIN BRENEMAN, born Aug. 28, 1784; died Dec. 24, 1837; Matty Breneman, born April 22, 1796, in Lancaster Co., Penn.; she was afterward Mrs. Shanton, and died Nov. 11, 1857; John Breneman, their second son, is now a farmer in Rock Run Township, Stephenson Co., Sec. 24; P.O. Davis; was born in Lancaster Co., Penn., Jan. 15, 1821; went to Ohio and settled in Medina Co., and remained there fifteen years, and then went to Stephenson Co. in the spring of 1867, and bought a farm of 110 acres, and has built a fine house with fine barn and out-buildings; his wife, Catherine Cummings, was born in Cumberland Co., Penn., May 2, 1826, and married Feb. 5, 1852; died Nov. 30, 1879, and had three children — Mary, was born in Medina Co., Ohio, Dec. 9, 1852, and is now Mrs. Kloster, in Douglas Co., Minn; John W., born Jan. 23, 1857, now at home; infant (deceased). In politics, Republican; in religion, Liberal.

DANIEL W. BRUBAKER, farmer, P. O. Freeport; born in Lancaster Co., Penn., 1848; came to Illinois in 1851, and owns 90 acres of land; made all the improvements. In politics, Republican; in religion, United Brethren. Has been Pathmaster. His wife, Amelia Bockmier, born in Stephenson Co., 185-1; married, 1874; had one child — Samuel O. (deceased), 7 months and 22 days ld.

WILLIAM H. BRUBAKER, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Freeport; born in Lancaster Co., Penn., in 1840; came to Illinois in 1852, with his father, who bought 300 acres and made the improvements; his father died some time ago; he owns 90 acres of land. In politics, Republican; in religion, Liberal. He enlisted, in the fall of 1863, in the 46th I. V. I., and served till the close of the war.

FREDERICK BUTICOFER, wagon and carriage maker, Davis; born in Switzerland, in 1836; came to America in 1857, and went to Wisconsin; then to Davis in 1868; owns town property. In politics, Republican; in religion, Spiritualist. His wife, Christer Breithaupt, was born at Baden in 1848; came to America in 1853; married in 1866, and have had four children — Ida, Charles, Owasso and Clayton. He enlisted in the 95th I. V. I., at Harvard, McHenry Co., Aug. 2, 1862, mustered out at Springfield, Oct. 2, 1865; engaged at Vicksburg, Nashville, Mobile, Montgomery, and with Price in Missouri.

DR. F. A. BUTTERFIELD, Davis; born in Rock Run Township in 1854; bought town property in Dakota; sold it and came to Davis. He attended Rush Medical College and graduated in the class of 1879-80. In politics, Republican in religion, Presbyterian. His wife, Alice J. Martin, was born in Dakota Township in 1852; married in 1875; have had two children — Ada O. and W. Ray.

DAVID CABLE, retired farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Ridott; born in Somerset Co., Penn., Oct. 30, 1803; came to Ohio in 1828, and then to Illinois in 1853; bought 160 acres of land and made most of the improvements; now owns 167 J acres. In religion, Liberal; in politics, Republican. His wife, Barbara Hughs, was born in Pennsylvania in 1812; married in 1827, and have had twelve children, as follows: Hattie now Mrs. Wolf, in Rock Run; Rebecca, now Mrs. McDonald, in Ohio; Jacob, in Rock Run Township; Louisa, deceased; David, in Grundy Co., Iowa; Seth, in Ridott, William, at home with his father; Elmos, in Montgomery Co.. Iowa; Wash, in Pierce Co., Wis.; Stephen, in Allen Co., Kan.; Adeline, now Mrs. Welyer, on the old farm; Serafa, now Mrs. Martin, in Nebraska.

JACOB CABLE, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Ridott; born in Knox Co., Ohio, in 1833; came to Illinois in 1853, a month in advance of his father; bought 47 acres, and now owns 62 acres, on which he has made the improvements. In politics, Republican; in religion, Liberal. His wife, Sarah Ann Gamel, was born in Pennsylvania in 1837; married in 1854; have eight children — Laura (now Mrs. Morrison, in Iowa), Symantha Cat home), Theodora, Wilson W., Charles, Emeline, Delbert and Ida.

WILLIAM CABLE, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Ridott, born in Knox Co., Ohio, 1843; came to Illinois, 1853; owns 80 acres of land; made all the improvements; enlisted, 1864, in the 46th I. V. I., mustered out in 1866; in politics, Republican; in religion, Liberal; his wife was born in Somerset Co., Penn.; married 1869, in June; have had two children, Milvin and Angie E.

H. D. COLE, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Davis; born in Erie Co., Penn., 1841; came to Illinois in 1864 with his father, who entered the land, and H. D. bought the homestead of 80 acres, and has since bought 40, and made some improvements. In politics, Republican, and in religion, Methodist; his wife, Diana Hoag, was born in Rock Run Township, Stephenson Co., in 1840; married in 1862, and has had nine children, six living — Charles Sidney, Frank Martin, deceased; John, deceased; Olive, Lottie, Guy, deceased: Roscoe, Archer W., Edward J.

R. E. COTHERMEN, miller and farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Rock City; born in Union Co., Penn., 1835; went to Ohio, remained about one year, then to Stephenson Co., and worked in Freeport, then in Green Co., Wis.; then in 1871, came to Rock Run, and bought the old saw and grist mill built by Michael Shane; the stone in this mill were brought to this country from Pennsylvania by Vanwenzler, who put them in a mill built at Cedarville, and these are the first stones brought to this county; when Adams built the new mill at Cedarville, he sold them to Shane, who put them in the mill at Rock Run, they are supposed to be over 100 years old; in 1877, he built a new mill; he also owns 63 acres, on which he has made some very fine improvements. Liberal in Religion; in politics, Republican; has been School Director. His first wife, Isabell Denins, born in Stephenson Co., married, 1856, died, March 7, 1862, in Wisconsin, and had four children — Charles F., Dixon T., teacher at Baileyville; Jessie, now Mrs. Hoag; Tilly Bell, in Green Co., Wis.; Matilda Winkelbeck, born in Pennsylvania in 1846. married at Monroe, Wis., and have one child — Ida May.

S. J. DAVIS, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Davis; born in Crawford Co., Penn., 1822; removed to Erie Co., Springfield, remained about one year, then removed to Illinois, Stephenson Co., to what was then known as Stackhouse, Camer and Flower's Mill, located in Sec. 27; he bought a claim of the mill property, and owns at present 477 acres, with a fine three-story stone building with fine improvements; also laid out the town of Davis, named after this family. Was first Town Clerk, for eight years; Assessor of Internal Revenue. His wife, Marv L. Ests, was born in New York in 1834; married in New York, in 1859; in politics, Republican; in religion, Liberal.

JOHN S. DAUGHENBAUGH, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. Ridott; born in Center Co., Penn., 1838; came to Illinois in 1846, with his father; they bought 117 acres of land on which they made improvements; afterward John S. bought 30 acres, and now owns 40 acres of good farm land, with good improvements. In politics Republican; in religion, Liberal. His wife, Nancy Hathaway, born in Stephenson Co., 1840; married in 1860, and had six children — Daniel, Robert, Franklin, Cora, Clara, infant, deceased.

CHRIST FEENY, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Davis; born in Lippe-Detmold, Germany, in 1823; came to America in 1854; bought 40 acres of land, made the improvements and sold it; bought 60 acres more, which he sold, and then bought 120 acres more. His wife, Amelia Beckmeir, born in Germany in 1835, came to America in 1855; married in 1857, and have nine children — Amelia, now Mrs. Gake; Mary, Henry, Mina, Louisa, Sophia, David, Frederick and John. In politics, Republican; in religion, Evangelical.

S. R. FOSTER, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Rock City; born in Union Co., Penn., in 1833, and in 1847, with his father, came to Illinois, and now owns 76 acres and made the improvements of a substantial kind. His wife, Nancy Barber, born at Rock Run in 1839, married in 1858, and have five children — F. R., A. J., Jennie S., Charles J., Dora, deceased. Presbyterian in religion; Democrat in politics.

LOUIS GERMAIN, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Rock City; born in France in 1825, and came to America in 1852; remained in New York seventeen years, and in 1872 came to Illinois and bought 40 acres and has made the improvements; also some timber land. His wife, Mary Bussly. born in France in 1831; were married in 1854; in religion, Catholic; have had nine children, six living, and most of them away from home.

MARTIN GILLEN, deceased; born in Ireland; came to America in 1855, and remained six years in New York; then came to Stephenson Co., worked on the railroad, bought 80 acres of land and made the improvements; he died June, 1866. His wife, Catherine Kelly, was born in Ireland in 1822, and came to America in 1855; married in 1838, and had nine children — Margaret, now Mrs. Stinson; Michael, James, John, Owen, Ellen, Ed., Catherine, deceased; Eliza, deceased. Edward SufFran, her second husband, was born in Ireland in 1826, married in 1868, and died on Christmas Day, 1879. He had children by his first wife, and was in the war of the rebellion.

JOHN GLYNN, farmer, Sec. 13; P.O. Pecatonica; born in Ireland in 1815 and went to England, remaining one year; he came to America, Stephenson Co., and entered 80 acres; has now 300, and made some fine improvements; has a beautiful grove, fine spring of water and stream on the land; also has a fine herd of Devon cattle. In politics. Republican; in religion, Catholic; has been School Director. He spent some years in California during the gold excitement in 1849. His wife, Mary Sowards, was born in New York in 1844; married in 1858, and have had eight children — Katherine, James, Maggie,Tildia, Rosa. Mary, Martin and Mike.

AARON GOLD, proprietor of hotel and retired farmer; P. O. Davis; born in Northampton Co., Penn., 1820; came to Illinois in April, 1857; bought land two years previous to his coming, and made all the improvements, and now owns 80 acres in Sec. 23, and came into Davis aud built the hotel in 1857, a very pleasant place near the depot of the C., M. & St. Paul R. R., also the post office. In politics, Republican; in religion, Lutheran. His first wife, Ellen Cokhoom, was born in Pennsylvania in 1828; married June 15, 1845; died March 20, 1874, the children are Matilda, Oliver Franklin Sidney, Harriett, now Mrs. Rossman, at Delmar; Janet Iva, Alice, now Mrs. Kunes, in Delmar; James E., at Milton, Iowa; John at home, William at home; Ellen S., died Oct. 5, 1868; Mable Clair. His second wife — Annie Marie Knolf, was born in Pennsylvania in 1830; married at Davis, Feb. 1, 1876.

J. H. GRAHAM, merchant and Postmaster, Rock City; born in Northumberland Co., Penn., in 1824, and came to Stephenson Co., June, 1842; entered 240 acres, and now owns 353, on which he has made improvements of a substantial kind. He has bought grain on the Western Union, in his own name, younger than any other man on the line. His wife, Margaret Young, was born in Pennsylvania in 1 835; married, in 1857, and have had eleven children — ten living at present.

CHARLES HAAS, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Rock City; born in Germany, in 1830; came to America at the age of 9 years, and settled in Northampton Co., Penn., and in 1877 came to Illinois, and bought 61 acres, and has made part of the improvements. In politics, Republican; in religion, Lutheran. Enlisted in the 79th Penn. V. I., Oct. 8, 1861, and mustered out at the close of the war. His wife, Christina Kurtz, was born in Germany, in 1839; came to America, in 1862; married, in 1864, and had had four children — John, Andrew, Henry (deceased), Charles.

JOHN HOAG, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Ridott; born in Susquehanna Co. > Penn., in 1814; came to Illinois in 1836; made a claim and sold; bought 160 acres; now has 205 acres; made all the improvements of a fine brick house, barn, good running water and spring. In politics, Republican. In religion, Methodist Episcopal; is Trustee and Steward. Has not been out of office since the township was organized. His wife, Margaret Row, born in New York, Dutchess Co., in 1817; came West in 1838; married in 1839; have had nine children, seven living — Henry, in Black Hawk Co., Iowa; Diana, now Mrs. H. D. Cole, in Stephenson Co.; Charles, at Storm Lake, Iowa; Alma, at home; Daniel, at home; Edward, at home; Olive, now Mrs. Stephens, in Black Hawk Co., Iowa; Betty and Alfred, deceased.

C. B. JOHNSON, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Davis; born in Norway, in 1827; came to America in 1859, and went to Janesville, Wis., and worked at his trade, blacksmithing; came to Bock Run and bought 48 acres of land, and made all of the improvements. In politics, Republican. In religion, Lutheran. His wife, Bell Peterson, was born in Norway, in 1824, and came to America in 1859; married in 1852, and they have had six children — Mary, now Mrs. Heyday, in Dixon Co. Neb.; Peter, born in Norway; Charlie, Julius, Morris and Addie, at home.

ROAN JOHNSON, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Dakota; born in Center Co., in 1818; came to Illinois in 1850; bought 160 acres of land, and now owns 430, and has made the improvements. In religion, Presbyterian, and Trustee of church. In politics, Liberal. His wife, Elizabeth Keil, was born in Pennsylvania in 1814; married in 1847, and have had one child — Mary Elizabeth, at home; they have an adopted son — George Kramer, taken at the age of 2 weeks. The first lumber he used in repairing the old log house was brought from Mount Carroll, through the sloughs, taking one week for a trip.

JOHN M. KAUFMAN, cooper, Davis; born in Baden Baden, Germany, in 1823; came to America in 1846, to New York, then to Canada a short time, then to Cincinnati, Ohio, there about four years; then to Stephenson Co., in 1852, August, and worked at the carpenter trade, and in 1 862 began coopering; has an extensive business in the manufacture of butter tubs; owns town property, and made the improvements, which are fine. In politics, Republican. In religion, Evangelical. His wife, Catharine Andres, was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, in 1843; married in 1863; have had five children — George Henry, in the shop; Annie, at home; Lena, at home; Edmond, at home; John, at home.

JACOB KEEHEN, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Rock City; bora in Prussia in 1830; came to America in 1853. to Illinois, and worked on the railroad; bought 40 acres of land, and now owns 75; made most of the improvements. In politics. Democrat. In religion, Catholic. His wife, Ellen Wertz, was born in Germany, Prussia, in 1841; married in 1859, Oct. 13, and have had five children — John, Mary, Barbara, Lizzie, and Barbara, deceased.

CHARLES H. KLIPPING, miller; P. O. Davis; firm of Slagle & Klippmg, Rock Run Mills; born in Florence Township, Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1856; worked on the farm about eight months and then learned the milling business in this mill; rented the mill and doing a fine business. In politics, Republican; in religion, Evangelical.

CONRAD KNOUP, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Davis; born in Stephenson Co., Ill.; owns 80 acres of land. In politics, Republican; in religion, Liberal. His wife, Catherine Miller, was born in New York, in 1851, and married in 1871. Have had three children — Henry Edward, Doretta and Lizzie May.

HELLECK KNUDSON, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Davis; born in Norway; came to America in 1839, and remained in Chicago until July, 1841, when he came to Rock Run and remained about five months, and then went to Mineral Point, Wis., and served an apprenticeship as a harness-maker there about two years, and then came back to Rock Run and worked on the farm with his brother and mother; he and his brother Thurston made the improvements on the 126# acres of land which now belong to Hellick, and he also owns 284f acres of land; the barn on the place is 36x50; good stone house and windmill. Has been Trustee, School Director and Pathmaster three different times. His wife, Caren Harrison, born in Norway, in 1826; married in 1855; died in 1856; second wife, Carrie Larson, born in Norway, in 1836; married February, 1860, and they have had seven children — Aneken Carine, born Oct. 1, 1860; Alice Lorine, born Jan. 14, 1862; Carrie Marie, born Jan. 16, 1864; Annie Christina, born Aug. 21, 1865; Knut Oscar, born April 13, 1867— died Oct. 6, 1867; Knut Oscar, born Oct. 4, 1868; Lars William, born Sept. 27, 1878— died Jan. 13, 1880.

THURSTON KNUDSON, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Davis; born in Norway, in 1825; came to America in 1842; to Iowa in 1842, with his father and mother; his father died on Lake Michigan and was buried in Milwaukee, in 1842; his mother bought a claim of 160 acres and made the improvements; his mother died Feb. 3, 1880; Thurston now owns 1983, and 20 acres of timber, in Winnebago Co.; he is now building a large barn 40x64 and eighteen-foot posts, with bank stabling, raised June 23, 1880. In politics, Republican; in religion, Lutheran. Has been School Director and Pathmaster. His wife, Jane Ann Alara, was born in Norway, in 1840; came to America in 1853; married in 1857, Dec. 15; died May 8, 1875, and left nine children — Caroline, at home; Johanna Malinda, Mary Ann, Nellie Cerinda, Charles Oscar, John Cornelius, Emma Louisa, Helen Sophia and Nels Wilhiem.

M. W. KURTZ, general merchandise, Davis; born in Lancaster Co., Penn., in 1837; came to Illinois in 1869, and engaged in the mercantile business; owns town property. In religion, Lutheran; in politics, Republican. Has been Town Trustee for five years, and School Director. His wife, Kate Markel, was born in Lancaster Co.. Penn., in 1849; married in 1862, and have had seven children — Rolland, Howard M., Lilly, Bertha, Levi, died in Pennsylvania in 1864; Stella, Martin, Jr.

D. G. LASHELL, of the firm of Young & Lashell, general merchants, Rock City; born in Loran, Stephenson Co., in 1849; his wife, Mary Rayner, born in Stephenson Co. in 1850; married in 1876, and have two children — Robert Alfred and George. Has been Town Collector; is now Secretary of the Rock Run Insurance Company, and School Treasurer.

J. LAUEK, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Dakota; born Oct. 15, 1809, in Pennsylvania; came to Illinois in 1845; bought 133 acres and made the improvements; has also 87 acres in Dakota Township. Has been Pathmaster. In politics, Democrat; in religion Lutheran. First wife was Rebecca Sullivan, born Oct. 25, 1815, in York Co., Penn.; was married Aug. 16, 1834; died in 1849, aged 33 years 9 months and 21 days, and left eight children — Sarah Ann, deceased; Jacob, in Rock Run Township; William, deceased; Rebecca, now Mrs. Kline, in Kansas; John Andrew, in Hardin Co., Iowa, Peter Henry, in Illinois; George Samuel, deceased; David Silivan. Second wife was born in Schuylkill Co., Penn., April 24, 1831; married in 1851, and have had ten children — Catherine, Elisabeth, now Mrs. Cross, in Davis; Joseph William, at home; Martin Luther, at home; Moses E., deceased; Stephen A. Douglas, deceased; Edwin Deitz, Aaron Washington, Annie Mary, Leonard Marion, Martha Jane.

S. B. LEACH, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Pecatonica; born in Maine, in 1845; came to Illinois in 1868. from New York City, where he had been to work for the Harlem Railroad; then went to Nora, Ill., and engaged with his brother in the carriage business; then to Winnebago Co., and bought a farm of 80 acres, and this he traded for property in Rockford, Ill., and went to work for the Rockford Water Power Company, and then to Pecatonica in the carriage business; from there to Stephenson Co., and bought 100 acres and made most of the improvements, and is now in Chicago to work for the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad, as master mechanic. In politics, Republican; in religion, Free Methodist. He took the first locomotive into Western Texas, set it up and ran it. First wife, Fannie Dean, deceased, was born in Maine, and they had one child, William, now in Chicago, foreman in Hayes & Prentice's, corner of Canal and Washington streets. Second wife, Harriet M. Westfall, was born in New Jersey, in 1829; married March 31, 1853, and have eight children — Henry, deceased; Garfield, deceased; Walter H., Porter F., Eveline W., Frank B., Fred B., deceased, and Richard C.

C. P. LEY, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Dakota; was born in Warren Co., Ohio, in 1856, and came to Illinois in 1869, and bought 200 acres. In religion, Presbyterian; in politics, Republican. F. C. Ley was born in Warren Co., Ohio, in 1849; came to Illinois in 1869, and bought, in company with his brother, 200 acres; they have a fine spring of water and a fine stream, which makes a fine stock-farm; the place was bought from Zimmerman, one of the old settlers of the county.

CHARLES J. LILJEQUIST, painter, Davis; born in Sweden in 1841; came to America, in 1865; to Rockford, Winnebago Co., in 1866; then went to Mississippi and Tennessee; then returned to Rockford, and then to Davis in 1868; owns town property. First wife, Agner C. Lindebled, was born in Sweden, in 1842; married in 1866, and had one child, Agnes C.; wife died in 1867. Second wife, Sarah Regies, was born in Pennsylvania, in 1846; married in 1869, and had four children — Annie May, Clara A., Ada Adella, John Alfred.

JOHN LONG, restaurant and grocer, Davis; born in Buffalo, N. Y., in 1843; came to Stephenson Co. in 1846, with his father, who bought a farm, and also owns town property. Enlisted in 26th I. V. I., in 1861, and remained until 1864. In politics, Republican; in religion, Evangelical; one of the Trustees of Davis. His wife, Mary Alberstedt, was born in Germany in 1845; married in 1868, and had one child — Cora Adella.

R. J. LONG, dealer in furniture and burial cases; born in Bavaria in 1839; came to America in 1852, to Pennsylvania; in the fall of 1852, to Stephenson Co. At the breaking-out of the rebellion, he was in the regular army, stationed at Fort Leavenworth, Kan.; mustered out and enlisted in the 46th I. V. I., September, 1861; discharged September, 1864; was in all the engagements from Donelson down the Mississippi; received commission in United States Regular Army as Lieutenant. Owns town property; is a carpenter by trade. His wife, Miss Mary Kaller, was born in Germany in 1849; came to America in 1852; married in 1865, and have three children — Jennie V., Elnora and Adella.

HENRY MAEIR, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Davis; born in Germany in 1820; came to America in 1847. and bought 180 acres of land; made the improvements; also owns 30 acres of timber. His wife, Barbara Weber, was born in France in 1830; came to America with her parents; she married in 1848, and have eleven children — Henry, Matilda, now Mrs. Runta, in Iowa; Fredrick, John, Herman, Mary, Martha, Sophia, Louisa, Daniel and Wilhelm.

WILLIAM MYERS, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Ridott; born in Germany in 1830; came to America in 1850, to Oneida Co., and remained about five years, and then came to Stephenson Co., at Freeport, in the railroad shops, and then, about nineteen years ago, came to this place and bought 40 acres of land, and made the improvements; now owns 285 acres, aud a fine house, and other good improvements. Was in the army in the old country. In politics, Democrat; in religion, Catholic. Has been Pathmaster. His wife, Mary Terney, was born in Ireland, in 1835; came to America in 1845; married in 1855; have had four children — Henry, Ida, Clara, Annie.

WILLIAM S. NEIL, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Dakota; born in Center Co., Penn., in 1821; came to Illinois in 1855; bought 71 acres; in 1859, 35 acres more, and this spring bought 35 acres more, and made all the improvements; built a barn 40x36, with windmill, wagon-shed, 30x24; fine house. In politics, Democrat; in religion, Presbyterian. His wife, Jane Colgan, was born in Ireland in 1824; married in 1845; died in 1864, and have four children living; second wife, sister of Sarah Colgan, was born in Ireland in 1832; married in 1875; children by first wife — William, in Doniphan Co., Kan.; Isabel! Smith, now Mrs. Neal; John S. and Mary E., twins.

ALEXANDER NIBLO, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Pecatonica; born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1815; came to America in 1820, and to Stephenson Co. in an early day; he owns 160 acres, and made the improvements; only 25 acres of the place were under the plow; now has 100 or over cultivated. His wife, Emily Amelia Nay, was born in Scotland March 17, 1839, and have had ten children, four living — Maggie A., Thomas R., George S. and Abraham; John James was drowned in Rock Run, in sight of the house, while in bathing, June 25, 1869; when they first came to Illinois, they lived in the house in which the first white man lived with his squaw; his name was Americag Mack.

S. OLSON, farmer, Sec. 26; P.O. Davis; born in Norway in 1822; came to America in 1842, and worked for Mr. Marsh, in Stephenson Co., and worked here and there for about two years, then entered 40 acres of land, and now owns 233 acres, and has made fine improvements; there is a fine stream on the land. Was Pathmaster twenty years ago. In politics, Republican; in religion, Lutheran. His wife, Jane Kundson, was born in Norway in 1817; came to America in 1843; married in 1845, and have six children, two living — Isabell and Ola; Knud, deceased; Sarah, deceased; Knud, deceased; Knud, deceased; wife died April 24, 1856; second wife, Isabel Crerson, was born in Norway, in 1830; came to America in 1854; married in 1857, and have eleven children — Jane, born in 1857, died in 1858; Ezra, born in 1858, died Oct. 25, 1858; Jane, born in 1860, died in 1860; John, born in 1861, died in 1861; John, born in 1862, died in 1862; Georgiana, born in 1864, died in 1864; Isabell, born in 1866, died in 1866; Ira, born in 1867; John, born in 1870, died in 1870; John and Johnnie, born in 1873; John died in 1873.

JACOB ORTH, general stock, Davis; born in Hesse Darmstadt, Erich, Germany, Nov. 3, 1840; left there and came to Illinois in 1852, and settled in Rock Grove on 200 acres of his father's land, who died June 9, 1869, aged 69; his mother is still on the old homestead; Jacob engaged in the brick business in Eplay Ann for three years. His wife, Elizabeth Wilkey, was born in Wisconsin, in 1845, and married Nov. 20, 1862, and then worked the farm for three years, and in the fall of 1866, came to Davis and engaged in the present business, under the firm name of Smith & Orth; Smith remained one year and a half, when his brother bought him out, and the brother remained ten years, when Jacob bought out his brother. Have had six children — Ella M., the eldest daughter, was born in Rock Run, Stephenson Co., Sept. 7, 1863, and died Jan. 15, 1880, at the residence of Rev. H. Huetsler, of Naperville, Ill., aged 16 years 4 months and 8 days, while attending the Northwestern College; Ella was converted under the labors of Rev. W. H. Bucks, during a revival at Davis; her remains were brought home on the evening of the 15th, and on Saturday, the 17th, the funeral services were held in the Evangelical Church; services by Rev. W. H. Bucks, of Freeport, he taking the text from Matt, ix, 24; Nettie Laura, fourth child, was born at the village of Davis, and died Feb. 27, 1880, age 9 years 11 months 22 days; during her last sickness she requested that something be sung, and, when several stanzas of “I will sing you a song,” “We're going home to-morrow,” “Sweet Bye-and-bye,” v and ” We shall gather at the river” were sung, she tried to sing too; but faint sounds could be heard, but they were from the heart and soul; she expressed a willingness to depart and be with Jesus and her sister Ella; Clara J., at home; Malinda, at home; Irene May, at home; Arthur J., at home.

PETER ROW, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Ridott; born in Bethlehem, N. Y., in 1814; came to Illinois in 1838, and took up a claim of 160 acres, and now owns 200 acres; made all of the improvements; is paying considerable attention to the raising of bees. In politics, Republican: in religion, Liberal.

CHRISTOPHER SCHLEITER, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Davis; born in Germany in 1820; came to America in 1857, and came direct to this place, and bought 86 acres of land; made all the improvements, and owns now 361 acres of land. His wife, Minnie Maeir, was born in Germany, in 1821; came to America in 1847, and have four children — Christopher, in Rock Grove Township; Henry, at home; Louisa, now Mrs. Nedemier; Hannah, at home. In politics, Democrat; in religion, Evangelical.

HENRY SCHLEITER, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Davis; born in Germany in 1827; came to America in 1848; came to Illinois in 1848; bought and now owns 140 acres of land; made good improvements. His wife, Elizabeth Schrader, was born in Germany in 1828; came to America in 1828; married iu 1850; have had nine children — Frederick, Mary, Martha, David, Elizabeth, deceased; Louisa, deceased; Henry, deceased; Daniel, John, deceased. In politics, Republican; in religion, Evangelical.

JACOB SLAGLE, miller; P.O.Davis; born in Northumberland, Co., Penn., in 1825; came to Stephenson Co. in 1865; bought 160 acres of land, and now owns 96 acres of land, including the mill known as the Rock Run Mill, situated on the Rock Run, half way between Rock City and Davis, doing a fine business; this mill was built, in 1854, by Catherine Epley, now residing in Missouri. His wife, Catherine Guist, was born in Pennsylvania in 1840; married in 1860, and have three children — Laura Alice, born Feb. 20, 1862— died Feb. 25, 1876; Dora Hester, born July 6, 1876; Walter Grant, born Nov. 12, 1872. In politics, Republican; in religion, Liberal. Enlisted in the Pennsylvania Battalion, June, 1864, and served six months.

D. B. SNIVELY, farmer, Sees. 14 and 15; P.O. Ridott; born in Franklin Co., Penn., in 1828; came to Illinois in 1865, to Adams Co., and to Stephenson Co. in 1869; bought 120 acres of land and now owns a saw-mill, known as the Rock Run Saw-mill; it wus bought from John Josler; built fourteen years ago. In politics, Republican; in religion, Liberal. His wife, Elizabeth C. Layman, was born in Franklin Co., Penn., in 1834; married in 1852; have had four children — Benjamin, Henry. Albert, William.

SAMUEL STRONG, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Ridott; born in Center Co., Penn., in 1828; came to Illinois in 1839; bought 45 acres of land in Eleroy Township; sold and came to Rock Run and bought 40 acres in Rock Run Township, SO in Ridott Township, and has made the improvement; has a stream of water and good mill. In politics, Democrat; in religion, Free Methodist. His wife, Phebe Gillman, was born in Union Co., Penn., in 1820; came to Illinois in 1840; they were married in the fall of 1840, and have eight children — William, in Ridott; Esther, now Mrs. Willits, in Lena; Charles Edward, in Stephenson Co.; Oscar, at home; Matilda, now Mrs. Westimer; Emma; two infants deceased. Has run a thrashing machine for the last thirty-five years, and is still ready for the business of 1880.

S. W. TALLMAN, editor Davis Review; born in New York in 1852, Jan. 12; came to Illinois in 1878, Jan. 18, and engaged in the Review, at Davis, Ill.

WILLIAM TEMPLETON, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Dakota; bom in Union Co., Penn.. in 1839; came to Illinois in 1844 with his parents, and they bought a claim of 160 acres, and made most of the improvements on the place; has a barn 36x67, with good bank stable, good spring of water, and in all a fine stock-farm; his father died several years ago. William is a Republican in principle, and, in religion, United Presbyterian. His wife, Amanda Frantz, was born in Center Co., Penn., in 1842; married in 1869, and have had four children — Annie P., Samuel P., Willie and an infant.

JOHN WEBER, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Davis; born in France in 1833; came to America in 1838, with his parents, and they settled in New York, and remained about two years, then came to Wisconsin, and then, in November, 1844, came to Stephenson Co. and entered 160 acres, and made the improvements; he bought 80 acres of land, and paid about $600; on this place he made all the improvements, and has a fine stone house and large barn; now owns 237 acres of land, with good improvements. His wife, Mary J. Walker, was born in Center Co., Penn.; came West at the age of 17; was married in 1856, and have eleven children — Ellen, now Mrs. Mathews, in Iowa; Emma, Greorge Franklin, Malinda M., Rosa, Clara, John H., Alice, Nettie, Charles, Lora. In politics, Democrat; in religion, liberal. Has been Pathmaster, Trustee and Justice of the Peace.

JOSEPH A. WEIR, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Rock City; born in Berks Co., Penn., in 1835; came to Illinois in the winter of 1855-56, and then returned to Pennsylvania, and then, in 1857, returned to Stephenson County; bought 40 acres of land, and now owns 151 acres, and has made all the improvements from the wild land. In politics, Republican; in religion, Methodist Episcopal. His wife, Elizabeth Stewart, was born in Freeport, Ill., in 1840, and married in 1862; have had eight children — William S., Jennie, deceased; Joseph R., Charles Colfax, James H., Maggie Elizabeth, Henry Kucher, Greorge A., deceased. Alexander McKenny, an uncle of his, came to this county from the Galena lead mines, with Mr. Carnefix, in the year 1836.

MICHAEL WOLF, deceased; he was born in Pennsylvania in 1824; came to Illinois at an early day, and entered 40 acres, and at his death, owned 470 acres, and 160 in Nebraska; made the improvements on the first 40 acres. In politics, was Republican; in religion, Liberal. Died May 7, 1880, after a short sickness. His wife, Hettie Cable, was born in Pennsylvania, in 18J9; married Feb. 19, 1856, and have had twelve children — Emma Alice, now Mrs. Foundray, in Indiana; Mary, now Mrs. Claws, in Rock Run; William, Charles, David, Thomas, Stephen, Newton, Susan, James; Franklin J. and Jacob, deceased.

PETER WOLF, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Dakota; born in Center,Co., Peun., in 1830; came to Illinois in 1855; bought 153 acres; now owns 40 acres in Sec. 32 and 40 in Sec. 28; made all the improvements. In politics, Republican; in religion, Methodist Episcopal, and a Trustee of Berlin church. Has been Assessor, Town Collector and Road Commissioner; is School Trustee. His wife, Elisabeth Rowray, was born in Union Co., Penn., in 1829; married in 1848, and have had twelve children — George William, in Rock Run Township; John P. at home; James F., at home; Kate, now Mrs. Tate, in Buckeye; Lizzie, at home; Ellen, at home; Frank, at home; Sally, at home; Eddie, at home; Volney Orin: Mary, deceased; Charles, deceased.

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Remarkable Stories, Volume 1
by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a Licensed Massage Therapist and Life Coach. An amateur historian, parts of these stories and many more appear on his website, www.robertbike.com.

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DAKOTA TOWNSHIP

LUTHER ANGLE, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Dakota; born in Stephenson Co. in 1847; his father, John B. Angle, came to this county in 1844; the subject of this sketch has always been a resident of the county, though a considerable portion of the time temporarily absent. During the civil war he was a soldier in Co. Gr, 46th I. V. I., participating with his command in all its engagements during his term of service; honorably mustered out at the close of the war, he reached home in February, 1866; he was then three years in school at Mt. Morris, Ill., and at Madison, Wis., devoting his time especially to the acquisition of a thorough knowledge of the branches most closely identified with his chosen profession, that of farming. Since leaving school has been engaged in farming; has 120 acres of land in Dakota Township, and his wife has 84 acres in Buckeye Township, inherited from her father's estate. Mr. A. is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and of the Republican party. He was married, in 1870, to Miss Sophia Clingman, daughter of Josiah Clingman; their children are Fred C, Harvey Jason and Mary Octava. Mr. Angle's family are deserving of mention as among the earliest settlers in the county; her parents, Josiah and Maria Clingman, came to Stephenson Co. in the spring of 1837, made their permanent home at the place of their first settlement, a mile north of Cedarville; the father died March 28, 1865, aged 57 years; the mother, aged 71, is yet living in Cedarville; their children were George W., deceased; Mary, now Mrs. Lutts, of Missouri; Chester, deceased; Eliza A., Thomas S., deceased; Jason, Wm. M., Edwin, deceased; Sophia, now Mrs. Luther Angle, and Ethel B.; the son Thomas S., deceased, was a Corporal of Co. A, 46th I. V. I.; wounded at the battle of Shiloh, April 6, 1862; he was sent two or three weeks afterward from the field hospital to the hospital at Quincy, Ill., from there was brought home in July, and died in consequence of his wounds, on the 4th of August, 1862. As evidence of their patriotic devotion to the cause of the Union may be here mentioned the fact that, in the same company with Thomas S. Clingman, were six others of the same name, a brother and five cousins.

A. M. ARTLEY, proprietor hotel, Dakota; was born in Lycoming Co., Penn., Aug. 23, 1845; came to Stephenson Co., Ill., with his father, Daniel Artley, and family, in 1856; had been engaged in farming, dealing in produce, etc., previously to his occupancy of the hotel, which has been under his proprietorship since March, 1879, and he still carries on some farming in connection with his other business; he keeps a comfortable, well-arranged and desirable hotel, owns some property in Dakota, attends carefully to his business, and is thoroughly respected by all who know him. During the civil war, he was for two years a soldier in Co. K, 46th I. V. I., participating in the battles of Ft. Blakely, Spanish Fort, etc., beiug mustered out with his command at the close of the war, which ended these years of faithful service.

WILLIAM ASKEY, druggist, Dakota; born in Center Co., Penn., May 1, 1837; came to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1849; he has an extensive and somewhat varied experience in professional and business pursuits; for the years 1865-67 and 1872-73, he was connected as teacher with Cole's Commercial College, in Peoria; in the interval between the dates above given, he was agent and operator on the Chicago & Alton Railroad; in the spring of 1873, he engaged in his present business in Dakota; has been located here since, and is thoroughly identified with the town, his business, property and home all being here. He was married in 1861, to Miss Elizabeth Brenizer, a native of Wooster, Ohio; their children are Ella, Jennie, Mary and Bertha.

W. R. AUMAN, grain-dealer, Dakota; born in Center Co., Penn., June 25, 1831; at the age of 8, came with his parents to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1839, locating first in Lancaster Township, between Freeport and Cedarville; Mr. A. was employed in farming up to 1865; for the last fifteen years has been engaged in the grain trade in Dakota; has some property in the town; has been Town Clerk for the last ten years; has held other town and school offices, and is a good worker for the interests of his community. Politics, Republican. He was married, in 1855, to Miss Susan Lattig, daughter of George W. Lattig, an old and honored citizen of Lancaster Township; their children are Howard, Horace, Elwin, Orrin and Perry, deceased.

D. B. BOBB, physician, Dakota; born in Pennsylvania, June 1, 1837; came to Stephenson Co., Ill., with his parents in 1845; studied his profession first wiih Dr. Hayes, then of Buena Vista, now of Freeport, afterward with Dr. Alexander Fisher, of Chicago; graduated at Chicago Medical College, theu Linn University, in 186-1; before his graduation, had been in the practice for a year at “Bobtown,” or New Pennsylvania, and, after graduating, practiced for some six months in the same place; he was then located for two and a half years at “Graball,” or Jamestown; he removed to Dakota in the spring of 1867, where he has since resided, and has built up a fine pracftce, his practice having extended over this territory before his removal here; he has been in professional life in the same field for the past sixteen years. Religion, Methodist; politics, Republican. He was married in 1860, to Miss Arminda F. St. John; they have two children living — Eugene Lafayette and Dwight; three deceased — Bylord, Quincy and Pardie. Dr. B.'s father, David Bobb, still lives in Buckeye Township, is over 67 years old, a much-esteemed citizen, and has materially aided the march of improvement since the time (thirty-five years ago) when he came to the county; the trip from Pennsylvania here was made in company with several families, comprising over forty persons in all, and the journey (made in wagons) occupied some six weeks' time. Mrs. Dr. B. is a daughter of Andrew St. John, who came here in 1836, and still lives in Buckeye Township at the advanced age of 72 years; his father, Andrew St. John, was an early trader in the Cahokia region, near St. Louis, when all that country was under French control; he removed here at a later date, and died in Buckeye Township, April 8, 18-49, aged 103 years; his father, also named Andrew St. John, a soldier of the Colonial period, fell in the war of the Revolution, while doing duty as a patriot under the command of La Fayette.

JOHN BROWN, farmer, Dakota; born in Pennsylvania June 30,1811; the family moved to Belmont Co., Ohio, when he was quite young; lived there until 1828, when they removed to Vermilion Co., Ill.; during their first summer in Vermilion Co., his father, John Brown, aged 62, was killed by a fall from a horse; the family were left in rather straitened circumstauces; but, the boys working out by the month, and the whole family being industrious and economical, the little farm then in their possession was improved and yielded them a living; in the spring ot 1835, Mr. Brown came to Stephenson Co., there being then but one family resident in Freeport; after making a claim here, building a house and establishing his mother in the dwelling, he went back to Vermilion, and remained there four years, after which he returned here for a permanent home; lived some time near where Squire W. B. Mitchell now lives; then for a winter in Cornelius Furst's house, north of Ridott; during that winter he built, about two miles southeast of where he now lives, a house, 14-1/3 feet square; moved into this house the following May; in this house, to which some additions were subsequently made, he lived until 1867, when he removed to his present residence; in eompany with Col. Dornblaser, he built the first warehouse in Dakota; completed and grain stored there before the track was laid to the warehouse; for many years after coming to the county, he was engaged in breaking prairie in connection with farming; alter the railroad came here, he was, for about a dozen years engaged in buying and selling grain, hogs, cattle, etc. (part of the time in company with George Bordner, of Freeport), for several years of the time doing more stock-buying than all the other dealers in the place; for the past three years has devoted his attention exclusively to farming; he has 435 acres of land in Rock Run Township, 80 acres in Lancaster, 160 acres in Dakota and 25 acres in Ridott; during the Black Hawk war, he was a soldier in Capt. James Palmer's company, Col. Moore's regiment. He has been Supervisor of his township, and has held various school and township offices. Religion, Methodist; politics, Republican. He was married, in 1833, to Miss Mary A. Hickman, a worthy, intelligent and energetic lady; she was a native of Brown Co., Ohio, removing with her parents to Vermillion Co., Ill., when in her 16th year; her parents, Jacob and Sarah Hickman, continued to reside in Vermillion Co. until their death. Jane Brown, mother of the subject of this sketch, died in 1854, aged about 65 years. Mr. and Mrs. Brown's children are Clark J., Sarah J., Mary A. (Mrs. F. B. Walker), Martha B., John H., Angeline V. (Mrs. H. Milligan), James C., Vincent D., Allen H., Florence V. and Caroline (died at the age of four).

LEVI CANDY, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Bock Grove; born in Center Co., Penn., Dec. 20, 1812; removed to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1864; has a farm of 120 acres at his home location, with 10 acres of timber-land in Bock Grove Township; his farm is under good cultivation, and his home surroundings decidedly pleasant. His religious preferences are with the German Beformed Church; his political affiliations, with the Democratic party. He was married in March, 1837, to Miss Catharine Emrich, a native of the same neighborhood in Center Co., Penn.; their children are Ann Maria, now Mrs. George Long, of Bock Grove; Sarah, now Mrs. Uriah Swartz, of Bock Grove, and John A.

J. CLINGMAN, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Dakota; the subject of this sketch, a son of Josiah Clingman, deceased, was born in Stephenson Co., Oct. 27, 1843; has been a continuous resident of the county, except during the civil war, when he was, for nearly three years, a soldier; enlisted in July, 1861, in Co. A, 11th I. V. I.; was taken prisoner at Ft. Donelson, and for eight months was in rebel prisons, at Macon, Bichmond, Montgomery and other points within the Confederacy; when exchanged, he rejoined his regiment, and did service there until he was promoted to First Lieutenant in the 55th U. S. I.; finally resigned on account of disability; since the war he has been engaged in farming; his farm comprises 160 acres. He is a member of the Bepublican party; is School Director in his district. In 1865, he married Miss Mary E. Smith, a native of Pennsylvania, but resident in Stephenson Co. since an early age; their children are Elfrida, Jennie and Bobert.

HARRISON DIEMER, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Dakota; born in Northampton Co., Penn., Oct. 18, 1828; came to Stephenson Co., Ill., with his parents, in 1847; has devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits, except two years (from the fall of 1854 to the fall of 1856), during which time he was engaged in mercantile business in Cedarville; he was the first supervisor for his township, after Dakota Township was detached from Buckeye, for seventeen or eighteen years a School Director, and has held other local offices. He is a worthy member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, an 1 of the Bepublican party; has a magnificent home farm of 280 acres, besides 12 acres of timber-land, in Bidott Township; all his possessions are the result of his own exertions, aided by the happy selection of a good location. He was married Nov. 6, 1852, to Miss Ann B. Etmyre; she was born in Washington Co., Md., April 2, 1836; came to Ogle Co., Ill., with her parents, in 1838; her father and mother thereafter resided in Ogle Co.; her father, Henry Etmyre, died in 1842; her mother, Sarah Etmyre, died in February, 1861. Mr. D.'s parents, Michael and Susan Diemer, were permanently in Stephenson Co. from 1847; his mother died in 1853, aged 54; his father lived in Cedarville the last eighteen or twenty years of his life; he died there March 29, 1878, aged 73 years, having been for over fortv years a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. and Mrs. Diemer have lived in their present location since 1856, have planned and executed the improvements on the farm, and the large, conveniently arranged and shade-embowered house, with its tasteful profusion of luxuriant flowers, shows, in all its appointments, a cultivated taste and careful hands; they have two children — Luther M. and Walter W.

JACOB DUBS, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Bock Grove; born in Germany Jan. 29, 1848; in 1852, his parents, Jacob and Henrietta Dubs, emigrated to America with their family; the mother died on the journey, and the father, with his two sons, Budolph and Jacob, settled in Stephenson Co. in the year above named; the father died Feb. 28, 1877, aged nearly 66 years; the brother, Budolph, of Cleveland, Ohio, is a Bishop of the Evangelical Church, and travels over much of the United States in the interests of the church. Jacob, whose name heads this sketch, has devoted his attention chiefly to agricultural pursuits; his farm embraces 85 acres of land, well improved, nicely situated and under good cultivation. Religion, Evangelical Church.

WILLIAM E. ILGEN, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Dakota; born in Center (afterward called Clinton) Co., Penn., Aug. 27, 1822; in 1842, he came to Stephenson Co., Ill., with his father, George Ilgen; worked on the farm with his father for eight years after coming here, but since his marriage has been farming for himself; has a farm of 80 acres. Is a member of the Lutheran Church; was a Democrat until the breaking-out of the civil war; since then he has been a Republican. In 1851, he married Miss Elizabeth A. Kaley; she was born in Union Co., Penn., Jan. 15, 1832; their children are Mary, Barbara Ann, Elizabeth (deceased), Sarah, Robert, Martin Luther, Normanda, George Emanuel (deceased), John Kassinas, Martha Ellen, William Grant (deceased), Americus Lincoln, Oscar Franklin, Caroline and Daniel Webster. Mrs. Ilgen came to Stephenson Co. in 1849, with her parents, Solomon and Elizabeth Kaley; her father died in 1866, aged 68 years; her mother, aged 80, is yet living near Buena Vista. The subject of this sketch has seen most of the growth of this locality of Illinois; made the first track from his father's house to Cedarville during the deep snow of 1842, when the grist-mills at Cedarville were inaccessible, the corn was dried in the stove, ground in the coffee-mill, and in this tedious method the meal was prepared; their wheat for the market had for a long time to be hauled to Chicago, 120 miles, by wagon, and sold for 35 cents a bushel. Contrasts between then and now are vividly present in the minds of the old settlers.

JOHN KRYDER, retired farmer; P. O. Dakota; born in Center Co., Penn., Jan. 16, 1797; resided there until 1847, when he removed to Stephenson Co., Ill.; bought and improved large tracts of land, which he afterward apportioned among his children, so that they are all comfortably provided for; retired from active work some thirty years ago, and, so far as bodily infirmities now permit his attending to business, his attention is given to managing his property and financial investments; he is invariably spoken of as a kind-hearted, useful man, ever ready to assist those who need help. Religion, Lutheran; politics, Democratic. He was married, in 1820, to Miss Susannah Keene, of Center Co., Penn.; she died in 1863; they had eight children, six of whom are now living — William, David, Jacob, Andrew J., Sarah J. (now Mrs. Martin S. Lapp) and Joseph; two deceased — Henry H. and Samuel M. The second son above named, David Kryder, with whom the father makes his home, was born in Center Co., Penn., Feb. 28, 1823, and came to Stephenson Co., Ill., with his parents, in 1847. Ts a member of the Reformed Church, and of the Democratic party. Was married, in 1846, to Miss Sarah Smull, who was born in Center Co., Penn., Feb. 1, 1822; their only child, Samuel J., died in 1864.

MARTIN S. LAPP, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Dakota; born near Black Rock Ferry, Bertie Co., Upper Canada, Dec. 26, 1826; in 1841, came to Ogle Co., Ill.; thence, after a year's residence, came to Stephenson Co. in 1842; has a fine 80-acre farm, with a good residence and other buildings. His religious preferences are with the German Baptist Church; his politics, Democratic. He was married, in 1849, to Miss Sarah J. Kryder, daughter of John Kryder, an old and honored citizen of Dakota Township; Their children are William Henry, Abram C, Lydia Ann (now Mrs. W. H. Miller), Mary Elizabeth (now Mrs. George W. Lilley), John Samuel, Susannah (deceased), Sarah Jane (deceased), Saloma Agnes, Jacob D.. Hattie Viola, Isaac Edward and Maudie May.

WILLIAM McELHINEY, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Rock Grove; born in Center Co. Penn., Dec. 26, 1820; his parents, with the family, left Pennsylvania in November, 1829, and came West, getting into Illinois some little time before Christmas of that } T ear; first settled in Edgar Co., lived there for several years, removing to Stephenson Co., in June, 1837; Mr. McE's. parents, John B. and Mary McElhiney, were well known as among the earliest settlers in their locality; the father died in 1872, aged about 81 years; the mother, 89 years of age, is yet living, making her home with her son William, the subject of this sketch; Mr. McElhiney's life-vocation has been, as is at present, that of farming; his farm embraces 80 acres; has been School Director in his District, but has no desire for office-holding. Politics, Democratic.

WILLIAM McELHINEY, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Dakota; born in Stephenson Co., Nov. 5, 1839; is a son of James McElhiney, an old settler and well-known citizen, now a resident in Rock Run Township. The subject of this sketch was, during the civil war, a soldier in Co. B, 46th I. V. I.; was engaged in the battles of Ft. Donelson, Pittsburg Landing, etc.; was honorably discharged after the battle of Shiloh. on account of disability, contracted in the line of his duty as a soldier; since the war, has been engaged in farming; has 80 acres of land, and his wife owns 150 acres both tracts located in Dakota Township. He is a member of the United Presbyterian Church, and of the Republican party. He was married in 1864 to Miss Mary S. Templeton, a native of New Berlin, Union Co., Penn.; their children are — Arthur T., Alberto Edwin, Ralph Alexander, Guy Willie and Pearley James Aiken; since their marriage they have lived eight years, 1867 to 1875, at Cleveland, Bradley Co., Tenu., returning here in 1875. Mrs. McElhiney is a daughter of Samuel and Mary Templeton, who were quite early settlers in Stephenson Co.; their children were — James A., Alexander, of Cleveland, Tenn.; David H., deceased; Walker and Mary S., Mrs. William McElhiney; David H., deceased, was a soldier in Co. D, 93d I. V. I.; he died of disease, in the fall of 1862, at the residence of his brother Alexander, who then lived in Dakota Township.

KEYES S. MARLIN, physician, Dakota; born in Lebanon Co., Penn., Dec. 25, 1833; lived most of his early life in Schuylkill Co.; studied his profession and attended lectures in Philadelphia, graduating at the Pennsylvania Medical College in 1854, at the age of 21; after being some little time in practice at Tuscarora, Penn., he came West and located at Rock Grove, Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1856; after about a year there, went to Iowa, and. when the war broke out, entered the service as Assistant Surgeon of the 20th Iowa V. I., and was in the service of the medical department for nearly five years, having there a wide range of service and of practice; was the greater portion of the time on detached service with different commands; while with Gen. Fremont, was the First Surgeon of McClurg's command; at a later date attended Batteries B, D and E, Mo. Artillery and a battery of heavy artillery, at Ft. Brown, and the last year of service was with the 37th I. V. I.. After the war was over, located in Dakota, and has a generous share of practice in his field of professional labor. His wife, Mrs. Caroline Wolf, nee Bordner, is a daughter of Jacob Bordner, an old settler and well-known citizen of Stephenson Co.; they have two children — Joan Alice and Francis Gurney.

ROBERT F. MITCHELL, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Dakota; born in Pennsylvania, in the part of Center Co. that is now Clinton Co., June 11, 1824; came to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1842; lived first at Buena Vista for six months, and then moved to the Miller farm, near Freeport, where he lived until 1864, when he moved to his present location. He was married May 28, 1843, to Miss Zero Ohcks, also a native of Pennsylvania; their children are Permila, Reuben R., Joseph Q., Charles E., George W. and James M.. Mr. Mitchell's farm embraces 120 acres, well located, in good condition and nicely improved. He is a member of the Republican party; has held township offices, and is thoroughly respected by all who know him. Aided by a worthy wife, good children, and intelligent industry, he is in quite comfortable circumstances; worth several dollars “less than nothing” when he came to the county, his example is worth noting, in illustration of what may be done by one who is willing to industriously sue his powers for good purposes.

SAMUEL R. MOYER, teacher, Sec. 10; P. O. Fountain Creek; born in Stephenson Co. Sept. 12, 1854; his parents, George and Mary Caroline Moyer, were old settlers here, coming here from Pennsylvania about 1851; both died some eighteen or nineteen years ago, the father aged about 38 years, the mother about 36 years; the subject of this sketch, after some preliminary study in the common schools, attended school, first at Naperville, Ill.; was one year there; afterward attended at Valparaiso, Ind.; was in attendance there for a year; closed his school attendance in 1876; had been teaching in alternation with attending school, before this time, and, since that date, has been engaged in the schools of the county; has been teaching, at least a portion of the time, every year siuce 1874.

ROBERT NELSON, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Dakota; born in the north part of Irelaud Jan. 8, 1829; emigrated to America, and settled in Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1844, in company with his parents, John and Mary Nelson; his father died in 1877; his mother is y t living; he has been chiefly engaged in farming; for about three years, from 1857 to 1860, he was traveling, principally in Kansas and Missouri; he has 100 acres of land in Dakota Township; in company with his brother, has 20 acres of timber-land in Richland, and besides this, he has a considerable quantity of land in Kansas; has held school offices for many years. Religion, Presbyterian; politics, Democrat. He was married in 1861, to Miss Elizabeth Wilson, who is a native of the same locality in Ireland that he is from. Their children living are Andrew, John, James, William. Samuel, Thomas, Robert, Sarah Ann and Mary Eliza; one other child, Robert, deceased.

SAMUEL OTTO, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Dakota; born in Pennsylvania in the year 1824; came with his parents to Ohio, in 1838, and from there, seven years later, to Stephenson Co., Ill., in November, 1845. His father, Daniel Otto, was killed by a railroad accident, June 25, 1860; his mother, Mary M. Otto, died in 1862. In 1848, he married Miss Ann Catharine Ilgen, also a native of Pennsylvania, and the daughter of George and Maria Ilgen; their children are — William H. (deceased), George D., Mary C. (deceased), Benjamin Franklin (deceased), and John D. Mr. Otto's farm embraces 96 acres, in a verv fine location. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; has b^en School Director and Constable for almost eighteen years; being here so early he has seen many changes in the country since his coming; he assisted in the survey of Cedarville when that town was laid out, and has seen most of the rise, growth and progress of his own town of Dakota.

S. P. ROTE, merchant; Dakota; born in Clinton Co., Penn., Sept. 4, 1837; came to Stephenson Co. in 1855; in the fall of 1857, he went to Green Co., Wis., and was there five years, though part of this time, at intervals, was in Stephenson Co.; most of these years he worked at the carpenter trade; returning here, he afterward bought a farm in the northeast part of Lancaster Township, and gave his attention to farming from the fall of 1867 to the fall of 1872; he then engaged in well-drilling and setting up pumps, which business he pursued until the fall of 1878; since that time he has been engaged in mercantile pursuits; his landed possessions embrace 136 acres in Lancaster, Ridott and Rock Run Townships, and he has, besides, some considerable property in Dakota. Religion, Methodist; politics, Republican. He was married in the spring of 1867, to Miss Rebecca J. Brown, daughter of William Brown, an old, well-known and much esteemed citizen of Lancaster Township, who settled here about 1845. Mr. and Mrs. Rote have an only son, a bright-eyed boy, named Willie.

B. SCHMELTZER, retired, Dakota; born in Lycoming Co., Penn., March 13, 1828; when 3 years of age, removed with his parents to Center Co., which was thereafter his home until his removal to Illinois; about 1850, he made a trip of a year's duration through Illinois and Iowa; removed to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1866; was for a long time largely engaged in stock-buying, etc., and for several years also engaged in mercantile business in Dakota; his working habits, the result of lon^ years of continuous activity, cause him to still keep moving in the management of his farms, etc., although he has retired from active business; he has 60 acres in his home farm, and 80 acres in another location, all, however, in Dakota Township; both farms are in excellent condition, and show the results of careful tillage. In politics, he is Democratic. In 1855, he was married to Miss Mary Hoy, also a native of Pennsylvania.

J. D. SCHMELTZER, grain dealer, Dakota; born in Center Co., Penn., March 4, 1823; removed to Stephenson Co., Ill., in January, 1854, having been with his family in Muscatine Co., Iowa, for a few months preceding this; has been engaged in grain-buying for the last twenty years; before this was in mercantile business in Rock Grove; was also Postmaster of that place, holding his appointment to the position from President Pierce; his property and business interests are in Dakota, and he takes a lively interest in promoting the welfare of the place. Politics, Democratic. In 1852, he married Miss Anna M. Mingle, also a native of Center Co., Penn.; their children are Thomas, George (deceased), Henry. John and Alice.

JOHN S. SMITH, grain, stock and lumber dealer, Dakota; born in Franklin Co., Penn., April 4, 1808; removed to Ohio in 1840, and from there, after a four-years' residence, came to Stephenson Co., Ill., in the fall of 1844; was employed in agricultural pursuits until about 1868 or 1869, when he retired from farming; was not, thereafter, in active business, until some four years ago, when he engaged in the lumber trade, which he has since carried on in connection with occasional dealing in grain, stock, etc.; has 330 acres of land in Lancaster and Ridott Townships, beside some town property, etc.; has held school offices. Is a member of the Lutheran Church, and is politically affiliated with the Democratic party. He was married in 1835 to Miss Catharine Frazier, a native of Somerset Co., Penn.; their chiildren are James (deceased), William, Lizzie, Orlando, John, Franklin, Annie and Ellen (deceased).

MICHAEL D. STACK, retired, Dakota; born in Ireland, in 1809; emigrated to America in 1847; after a brief stay in Montreal, Canada, he came into Vermont, where he remained about two years, and then removed to Ohio; lived in that State four years; from Ohio he removed to Indiana, in which State he resided four years, removing to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1857; was employed in railroading from 1847 to 1857, and worked on track repairs on the railroad here for several years after the completion of the road; has not been in any active business since 1865; he is the present President of the Board of Village Trustees, and held the same position during two previous terms, in 1855 and 1856; was also Street Commissioner for two years; has six lots and a house in Dakota, and is comfortably circumstanced. Religion, Catholic; politics, Democrat. In 1843, he married Miss Mary Denaan, also a native of Ireland; she died in 1863; his children are John, Margaret, Robert Michael and Ellen Mary.

JAMES A. TEMPLETON, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Dakota; born in Union Co., Penn.. July 2, 1828; came to Stephenson Co. in 1849, with his parents, Samuel P. and Mary Templeton, known by a large number of people in the county; his parents were beloved for many estimable qualities, by all their acquaintances; his mother died in 1858; his father in April, 1879; Mr. T. has been chiefly engaged in farming, though for six years engaged at the same time in mercantile business in Dakota; he was for several years Supervisor for his township; has held various township and school offices, and is, in all good enterprises, one of the leading men of his community. Religion, United Presbyterian; politics, Republican. His farm embraces 165 acres in Dakota and Rock Run Townships. He was married, Dec. 26, 1854, to Miss Jennie W. Curran, a native of Juniata Co., Penn.; their children, living, are Mary J., Annie E. J., Laura Luella, Samuel H., Oscar J., Lizzie J. and Walker W.; those deceased are Willie, Harvey, and one who died in infancy.

WALKER TEMPLETON, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Dakota; born in Union Co., Penn., Feb. 14, 1839; with his parents, Samuel and Mary Templeton, came to Stephenson Co., Ill., in the spring of 1849; during the civil war, he was a non-commissioned officer of Co. D, 93d I. V. I., of the 15th Army Corps; most of the time he was one of the sergeants of the color-guard, and consequently saw the liveliest portion of the battles through which the flag of his regiment was carried in the numerous engagements in which it bore a gallant part; among these conflicts may be mentioned Champion Hill, siege of Vicksburg, Altoona Pass, Missionary Ridge, etc., etc.; he was discharged, at the close of the war, at Louisville, Ky., and has since been engaged in farming; has 120 acres of land in Dakota Township and 20 acres of timber land in Ridott Township. Is a member of the United Presbyterian Church; politically, is affiliated with the Republican party. In 1872, he married Miss Elizabeth Bragg, a native of England; in her childhood she came to America with her parents; her parents, Wm. M. and Margaret Bragg, first settled in Iowa, and afterward removed to Kansas, where they now reside. Mr. and Mrs. Templeton have one child, William S.

R. M. TELFER, railroad agent, Dakota; born in Hamilton, Scotland, Jan. 9, 1850; in the same year the family emigrated to America, and settled in Racine, Wis., where his parents still continue to reside; Mr. Telfer has been chiefly employed in railroad business; for the last fifteen years has been in the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul R. R. Co.; four years of that time he was in Racine, Wis., four years in Savannah, and for the last seven years, as railroad and express agent and telegraph operator at his present location. Politics, Republican. He was married in 1870 to Miss Flora Wallace, who was born in Muscatine Co., Iowa, Sept. 22, 1851, but has, for the most of her life, been a resident of Ielinois; their children are Jennie, Belle, Fred and Flora. Mr. Telfer's parents are David and Mary Telfer, of Racine, Wis.; his grandparents, Archibald and Jennie Telfer, also came to Racine in 1850; they afterward removed to Elkhorn, Wis., and died there at a good old age; Mrs. Telfer's father, Alexander Wallace, came to this country, from his native place in Scotland, at an early period in the history of the West; was chiefly engaged as a practical river-man, in steamboat enterprises on the Mississippi River, until nearly the time of his death, which occurred in 1852. His wife, Sarah Wallace (now Mrs. Needer, by a second marriage), is yet living in Clinton, Iowa.

COL. GEORGE WALKER, retired farmer; P. O. Dakota; born in Center (afterward Clinton) Co., Penn., April 17, 1809; removed to Stephenson Co., Ill., in 1849; the trip from Pennsylvania here was made by wagon, five weeks being occupied in the journey, reaching here on the 24th of October, of the year above named; his vocation has been farming since 1836; this was varied by official business, etc., but his active spirit has made for him a constantly busy life; he was Auditor of Clinton Co., Penn., for a term, and another term, Commissioner of the same county, and has held various local offices since his residence here; he has quite an extended military experience, having been, under the militia system of Pennsylvania, five years a Lieutenant, seven years a Captain, and seven years a Lieut. Colonel; the last three years of the time was an aid to Gov. Francis R. Shunk, of Pennsylvania; his property here embraces 180 acres of land, a block in the east part of Dakota, four lots in his residence property, etc. Religion, Lutheran; politics, Democratic. He was married in 1836 to Miss Mary Gamble, also a native of what is now Clinton Co., Penn.; their children are James W., Franklin B., Mary C, John S., Nancy E., Amanda J., Emma (deceased) and George V.

F. B. WALKER, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Dakota; born in Pennsylvania in 1840; came to Stephenson Co. with his father, Col. George Walker, in 1849; has been continually engaged in farming enterprises, and pushes his business forward to intelligent success; is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and of the Republican party; is now, and has been for the past six years, a member of the County Board of Supervisors, and is highly spoken of throughout his township. He was married Nov. 15, 1871, to Miss Martha Brown, daughter of John Brown, of Dakota; their children are Saidie Edna (deceased), Harry A. and Iva V.

O. D. WEAVER, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Dakota; born in Cumberland Co., Penn., Oct. 16, 1825; came to Stephenson Co., Ill., in the fall of 1845; the three previous years, 1842 to 1845, he had lived in Ohio; in 1852, he went to California; was engaged in mining there for three years; returning here in 1855, when the railroad was built here, he completed the portion of it from Davis to the section west of Dakota, under the direction of the company; was employed in railroading until 1858 or 1859, since which time he has been chiefly engaged in farming, his farm comprising 80 acres; has been Collector of his township, Commissioner of Highways, etc. Religion, Methodist Episcopal; politics, Republican. He was married, in 1846, to Miss Henrietta Ilgen; their children are Sultan Armenium, Gustavus Adolphus, Myrrah P., George I., Onesimus Daniel, Henrietta Prudence, Laura Eldora aud Lila Minerva. The family is quite noted for musical ability, and for range of voice, culture and ability of execution with different musical instruments, is seldom equaled. The subject of this sketch is the only one living out of all his father's family, which consisted of eight children, viz., Theophilus J., Elizabeth, Titicum D., Onesimus D., Catharine, Asaph J., Charlotte A. and Michael. The father of this family, Michael Weaver, was born April 10, 1796; died of cholera in New Orleans in September, 1832; his wife, whose maiden name was Charlotte Krill, was born Feb. 27, 1802, and died June 15, 1831. A generation farther back, the parents were Philip Weaver and Elizabeth Weaver; her maiden name was Elizabeth Hyde; she was a daughter of Abram Hyde, and was born in 1762; was married to Philip Weaver in 1785. Mrs. Henrietta Weaver is a daughter of George Ilgen, who laid out the town of Cedarville; he died July 12, 1864; his father, William Emanuel Ilgen, came to America during the Revolutionary war, and finally became a Lutheran minister in Pennsylvania, and was much beloved by all his people.

CHARLES WILSON, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Dakota; born in the North of Ireland, in the year 1825; when he was only a year old, his parents emigrated to America, and settled in Washington Co., Penn.; in 1852, he came to Stephenson Co., Ill.; has a neat farm of 160 acres, well located and under good cultivation. In 1853, he was married to Miss Mary Wilson, a native of the same neighborhood in Ireland; they have four children — Jane (now Mrs. Thomas Crow), Annie, Andrew and Moses.

JOHN WINTERS, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Dakota; born in Center Co., Penn., March 11, 1839; when he was 6 years of age, his parents removed with their family to Ohio, and, in 1857, came from there to Stephenson Co., Ill, and settled in Lancaster Township; his father, Abram Winters, died in 1868; his mother, Sarah Winters (sister of Robert and Thomas Bell), died in 1866. He was married, in 1870, to Miss Mary Wright, daughter of Paschal and Jane Wright (both deceased), who came here from Pennsylvania about 1840, settled in Harlem Township, and lived there until their death; they have two children — Jennie Winters and Bessie Winters. Mr. W. has a farm of 120 acres in Dakota Township, and 6 acres in Ridott Township; he has held township offices. Is a Republican; is not connected with any church, though his wife is a member of the Presbyterian.

JOHN WIRTH, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Dakota; born in Wittenberg, Germany, Sept. 5, 1826; emigrated to America in 1852; lived for two years in New York, removing to Stephenson Co., Ill., in April, 1854; with characteristic industry and thrift, has acquired quite a handsome property; has 200 acres of land in Dakota Township, besides 30 acres of timber land in Buckeye and Lancaster Townships. Is a member of the Lutheran Church, and of the Democratic party. His wife's maiden name was Catharine Haist; she was born in Erie Co., N. Y.; their children are John Jacob, Mary Helena, George Adam, Willie Andrew (deceased), Eva Louisa, Henry Tobias, Annie Julia and Catharine Rosena.

SOLOMON WISE, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Rock Grove; born in Union Co., Penn., August 5, 1832; lived there until he was about 21 years of age, coming to Stephenson Co., Ill., in the winter of 1853; has pursued the vocation of farming as his constant business; has a good farm of 80 acres. His politics, Republican. He was married in 1860, to Miss Mary Alexander; she was born in Big Valley, Penn., March 29, 1833; they have four children living — Sarah, Harrison, Percival and Catharine; three children deceased — Jane, James, and one who died in infancy.

J. R. YOUNG, merchant, Dakota; the subject of this sketph, who is a son of Capt. William Young, an old settler and well-known citizen of the county, was born in Stephenson Co., Dec. 24, 1849, and, except the two years 1873 and 1874, which were spent in Iowa, has been a constant resident of the county; has been engaged in mercantile pursuits since 1873; before that time was employed in farming; has a well-stocked, tastefully arranged and prosperous store; has been Postmaster of Dakota ever since his coming to the place, in 1875, and is well identified with the best interests of his town. Politics, Republican. He was married in December, 1873, to Miss Olive Rodearmel, daughter of Henry Rodearmel, of Freeport; Mr. and Mrs. Young have three children — Harry, Anna and Edna.

DANIEL ZIMMERMAN, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Dakota; born in Lycoming Co., Penn., Jan. 27, 1819; removed to Stephenson Co., Ill., in the fall of 1846; has a fine farm of 200 acres, under good cultivation, with neat, roomy and convenient buildings, etc. Has held school offices in his township. Ts a member of the Reformed Church. In politics, is Democratic. He was married, in 1843, to Miss Harriet Phifley, a native of Wittenberg, Germany; she was born Jan. 24, 1821; came to America when 11 years of age; died Aug. 24, 1874; the children are Christiana, now Mrs. L. H. Weaver, of Montgomery Co., Iowa; Daniel M.; John F., of Montgomery Co., Iowa; Catharine Elizabeth, now Mrs. Wilson T. Walker, and William Emanuel.

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Remarkable Stories, Volume 1
by Robert Bike

Remarkable events have happened in Freeport and Stephenson County, Illinois, and remarkable people have lived there. These are stories gathered about people and events from 1835 through World War II.

By no means complete, these are overviews of lives and events which shaped our country and our world. From events in the lives of Tutty Baker, Abraham Lincoln, Charles Guiteau, Leonard Colby, Jane Addams and Bob Wienand come stories that will amaze you. Welcome to Volume 1 of our living history.

The author lives in Eugene, Oregon, and works as a License